Archive for the ‘ Mobile professions / portable business ’ Category

Self-Marketing in the Canadian Job Market

As Wikipedia states: “The career management process begins with setting goals/objectives. A relatively specific goal/objective must be formulated. This task may be quite difficult when the individual lacks knowledge of career opportunities and/or is not fully aware of their talents and abilities. However, the entire career management process is based on the establishment of defined goals/objectives whether specific or general in nature. Utilizing career assessments may be a critical step in identifying opportunities and career paths that most resonate with someone.”

In a tight job market, getting all the details right matters, and a spreadsheet helps.

Here are some job search strategist

1.Do research about the companies you are applying to, take time to determine the best career choice and to keep a job-hunting spreadsheet.   By using the spreadsheet, you’ll quick access to everyone’s contact information and could quickly find the details you needed about people and jobs, instead of keeping track of dozens of business cards, e-mail messages and written notes.   Words of wisdom: In a tight job market, getting all the details right matters, and a spreadsheet helps. “(It allowed me to have) a much more personalized approach and whenever communication would occur I could check the spreadsheet and know exactly where we left off.

Highlights  

•Use Facebook and its microtargeting ability to find help in your search.  

•Follow bloggers on Twitter to learn about the latest job openings.  

•Shadow an employee to learn about their job, and you might get noticed.

Smart strategy:

Turned to the microblogging service Twitter to see if   you can find the latest job postings. Do also  real-time Twitter searches by position and location (“executive assistant, Hamilton”) to pull up recent tweets.

One USA example also use in Canada:

Name: Marian Schembari Old gig: Freelance writing in New York and Connecticut New gig: Associate publicist at Jane Wesman Public Relations in New York Smart strategy: Instead of responding to an employer’s job posting, she posted an ad for herself on Facebook, the social networking site, and used its microtargeting capability to home in on people who were most likely to offer her a job.  

Her ad asked, “I want to work for Harper Collins, can you help?” Anyone identifying themselves as a company employee saw it on their page. Readers could click on a link that directed them to her resume. Though she wasn’t able to find work with Harper Collins, she did connect with 100 people in two weeks, including someone who was able to offer her a job.   Words of wisdom: Recognize that the best way to get a job isn’t always to apply for it directly.

“I wasted so much time writing perfect cover letters and sending them into the Internet abyss,” she says. “You have to get out there in a way that people will come to you, not the other way around.”

Read this on self-marketing

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How to get in touch with ‘real’ Canadian employers?

Question in Detail:  Dears,  I have got Canadian immigrant visa, and I plan to come to Canada in November 2012. At the moment, I am in process of finishing a project in Yemen for a multinational. I have over 7 years of experience in managing IT, Logistics projects, and operations managmenet in 4 different countries. Of course, I would looking for work in my areas of expertiese mentioned above. I have sent my CV through a few online job portals, but haven’t received any response. I am wondering if that’s the best way to find work in Canada. Can somebody please help me with 1. determining if I can arrange a job before arrival to Canada? 2. what is the best way to approach companies (oil and gas for instance) 3. are there any job agencies that can put me in touch with companies or businesses (I am ready to pay for their service). Thanks very much in advance for help. S.

Re.

You have the million dollar question or the four  more requested  questions !

1.  Best way to find work in Canada

2.  Arrange a job before arrival to Canada

3.  Best way to approach companies

4.  Job agencies that can put me in touch with companies or businesses

Working in Canada – Looking for employment from outside Canada

Canada has a wealth of employment opportunities for Recreation , leisure, outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers. Parks, resorts, conservation and wildlife areas are a few options available. There are career opportunities, as well as temporary or seasonal jobs, with a wide range of jobs. Positions have a variety of responsibilities requiring a diverse set of skills ranging from cashiers, to field workers to managers. Students are often sought for seasonal positions.
 
 
 
Parks and conservation areas hire summer employees for interpretation, assisting visitors, booking campsites and a broad range of other jobs. Biology and environmental students have the opportunity to assist in wildlife or ecology studies. If your looking to land a job at one of Canada’s numerous resorts, the variety of opportunities ranges from hospitality management, to cooking, serving, cleaning or even general handy work. If you have the skills (certification is usually key) you might want to apply for the best job we know of – guideing in the outdoors. Whether rafting, canoeing, backpacking or climbing, getting paid for what you love to do, has just gotta be it!

 
Employment – By ProvinceAlberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Yukon Territories

Employment by CategoryEmployment – General
Employment Web Sites – Outdoors and Resorts
  • Cyber-Sierra – Excellent site for outdoor related jobs
  • EEP – Great resource for environmental career information
  • Environmental Jobs – Very good resource for finding outdoor employment
  • Outdoor Action Guide – From one of the pioneers, definitive outdoor information on the internet – a career guide!
Guides and Outfitters
Lands and Forests
Nature, Environment and Ecology
Parks
Resorts, Snowboarding/Ski Hills
Retail
Student Exchange Programs
Tourism
Tree Planting

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Job Hunting & Working in Canada

 Job Hunting & Working in Canada

Finding work in Canada has two basic requirements – good English and Canadian work experience.  But the good thing about these strict requirements is that Canada government is there to help once you meet the guidelines.  There is lots of free English courses for those who wish to improve their English.  And its community agencies are just a call away should you need assistance in looking for a job.

And the best part of working in any Canadian Province?  The government and the society itself are your best buddies in job hunting! You need to network.
 

You will heard many times about The “Hidden Job Market”

Most job openings are not advertised by Canadian companies.  To find opportunities, you must “network” and market yourself.  Talk to the people you know, or to the people they know, to discover current job openings.  Then contact the employers directly, and convince them that you are the one they are looking for. 

In case you are still building your social network, Provincial Business & Firms Directory will be a very good friend.  It lists all businesses in Canada wide, and includes pertinent information about the companies including their contact information.

Job Fairs

Some companies in Canada hold job fairs where they invite jobseekers for a chance to be part of their circle.  www.thenationaljobfair.com/visitors  has an online calendar that lists job fairs and other career-related events.

Volunteering

All community organizations  in Canada – from social to religious to educational and medical organizations – welcome volunteers.  For the job hunter, it is a chance to widen your social network, practice your English or French, and obtain that Canadian working experience.  And the reward of helping the community – Canadian employers recognize volunteering as a work!

Recruiters

Some companies – particularly those with Information Technology (IT), office or accounting needs – hire outsourcing agencies to find employees.  These agencies in turn look for the people who can meet the qualifications set by employers.  www.thetorontoemploymentdirectory.com directory lists the staffing employees you could contact in Ontario for instance.  Just have your profile added to their database, and you may expect job opportunities knocking at your door.

Headhunters

If you are still preoccupied and do not have time to look for a job yet, you can contact the ‘headhunters’.  These private companies can be hired and they will be the ones to find you a job.
There are still a lot of ways to find a job and work in Canada.  The local government of each province is still finding ways to help its newcomers land on their dream jobs.

Canadian companies that hired international profesionals and students

Finding a job as international profesional  takes hard work.  It’s a good idea to prepare for your job search before you leave for Canada. Getting ready for interviews, improving your English or French language skills, and getting in touch with a possible mentor   all may help in finding a job.
 Here are few tips:
First. Strong employment prospects for you as an international profesional and international student may be with organizations that have an international focus, such as the World Trade Organization, World Health Organization,World Bank or African Development Fund. Likewise, you may have more success with Canadian companies that have an international presence. Your international experience, language andcultural fluency make you very attractive to these organizations. In addition, if your Canadian work  authorization is delayed, you may be able to continue to work at one of their branches outside of  Canada. (ie: in your home country). Hineni Media Subscription site includes several  resources that name  Canadian companies with divisions throughout the world. Here you will find  a few:
Secondly, as an international profesional or international student you may find the job search process less difficult if you study technical subjects. High tech firms in Canada are desperate to hire skilled workers, particularly inthe areas of Systems Analysis and Programming, Engineering and Accounting. If you are not majoringin one of these areas, at least consider developing computer skills (programming, word processingand spreadsheet design, web development), quantitative skills (accounting, statistics and economics) and/or scientificskills (lab research) through elective classes, independent studies or extracurricular activities tomake yourself more marketable.
Here is a partial list of companies that hired international students who graduated from Canadian programs:❖ Scotia Bank ❖ Ernst and Young❖ Xerox❖ 3M Canada Company❖ MTV World❖ Thrifty Foods❖IBM Canada❖ Meyers Norris Penny Canada❖University Health Work❖ Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro❖ Peterbourogh Regional Health❖ Nestle Canada
 
 
 Canada Employment System
The first step in designing an effective job search strategy which will lead to employment in Canada is to clearly understand the setting in which you are operating. As a international professional or international  student, you  may not have had much experience job-hunting in your home country. Even if you have, you arelikely to find job-hunting in Canada is a different process. The differences are culturally based and, therefore, you may have to work very hard at overcomingthe natural inclination to conduct yourself as you would if you were looking for a job in your homecountry. Different cultures have different sensibilities. Be aware of the setting in which you areinterviewing.  Hineni Media blogs about it and  offers services  to assist you in your  Canada job search process.   Take  time to read some of this material before you begin your search.