Posts Tagged ‘ find valuable jobs in canada ’

30 Careers with 2010 High Growth in Canada

30 careers  with High 2010 Growth in Canada

1. Registered nurses
Minimum education or training: Associate degree
2. Home health aides
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
3. Customer service representatives
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
4. Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
5. Personal and home care aides
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
6. Retail salespersons
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
7. Office clerks, general
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
8. Accountants and auditors
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
9. Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants
Minimum education or training: Postsecondary vocational award
10. Postsecondary teachers
Minimum education or training: Doctoral degree
11. Construction laborers
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
12. Elementary school teachers, except special education
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
13. Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
14. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
15. Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
16. Executive secretaries and administrative assistants
Minimum education or training: Work experience in a related occupation
17. Management analysts
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s or higher degree, plus work experience
18. Computer applications software engineers

Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
19. Receptionists and information clerks

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
20. Carpenters
Minimum education or training: Long-term on-the-job training
21. Medical assistants
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
22. First-line supervisors/managers of office and administrative support workers
Minimum education or training: Work experience in a related occupation
23. Network systems and data communications analysts

Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
24. Licensed practical and vocational nurses
Minimum education or training: Postsecondary vocational award
25. Security guards
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
26. Waiters and waitresses

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
27. Maintenance and repair workers
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
28. Physicians and surgeons
Minimum education or training: First professional degree
29. Child-care workers

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

30. Teacher assistants

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2. Diaz, Marisol specialize in permanent, contract and contract-to-permanent employment resources for  seasonal, temporary, internships, summer jobs. Headquartered in Toronto, Ontario.  Marisol’s services Ontario and metropolitan GTA markets with additional technology contracting resources nationwide. For more information on Diaz, Marisol visit http://www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org/

Vancouver summer jobs, work, careers & employment

•Vancouver’s  seafood industry is one of the largest primary industries and remains a vital element in both the economic success of the province and the social fabric of many communities. Vancouver ‘s seadfood industry  is a year-round business, but the majority of the jobs in fishing and processing are available from May through September – ideal timing for summer job seekers. Working in the seafood industry means the potential for solid, short-term earnings and gaining the experience of a lifetime. Overtime and bonuses alone sometimes add up to more than most retail jobs pay.
•Vancouver’s  tourism is a mainstay for the Canadian economy and summertime is its pinnacle. For job seekers, opportunities abound on cruise ships, lodges, hotels, rail lines and national parks.
•Summer camps are the quintessential summertime employers. With thousands of day and sleep-over camps in the province, camping and lodging are great summer employment options for young people. Many camps also hire adults with professional training, including counselors, social workers and nurses for summer jobs.
•You can find more information about summer camp jobs at the Guide to Summer Camps  or visiting the province as a simply tourist. Check out some of the malls or go downtown and just start handing out resumes because theres a lot of shops that are related to nutrition, clothes, shoes, pharma or jewelry.
•Theme parks and water parks are the perfect place to spend your summer – and not just as a paying guest. Working at a summer attraction is fun, exciting and social. Theme parks employee people in a range of different positions – from ride operators and food servers to entertainers and managers. The bigger the park, the greater the opportunity, but even local amusement parks offer great employment options.
•Outdoor jobs are also in abundance in the summer and they are a great way for hardworking, adventurous young people to earn great money. The other plus of outdoor jobs is that many provide room and board, along with their higher-than-average salaries. Options include dude ranches, national and state parks, and logging mills. Whatever kind of job you want this summer, remember that the early bird catches the proverbial worm. Don’t leave your job search to the last minute. Start now so you can have you pick of summer job opportunities.

Canadian companies that hired international profesionals and students

Finding a job as international profesional  takes hard work.  It’s a good idea to prepare for your job search before you leave for Canada. Getting ready for interviews, improving your English or French language skills, and getting in touch with a possible mentor   all may help in finding a job.
 Here are few tips:
First. Strong employment prospects for you as an international profesional and international student may be with organizations that have an international focus, such as the World Trade Organization, World Health Organization,World Bank or African Development Fund. Likewise, you may have more success with Canadian companies that have an international presence. Your international experience, language andcultural fluency make you very attractive to these organizations. In addition, if your Canadian work  authorization is delayed, you may be able to continue to work at one of their branches outside of  Canada. (ie: in your home country). Hineni Media Subscription site includes several  resources that name  Canadian companies with divisions throughout the world. Here you will find  a few:
Secondly, as an international profesional or international student you may find the job search process less difficult if you study technical subjects. High tech firms in Canada are desperate to hire skilled workers, particularly inthe areas of Systems Analysis and Programming, Engineering and Accounting. If you are not majoringin one of these areas, at least consider developing computer skills (programming, word processingand spreadsheet design, web development), quantitative skills (accounting, statistics and economics) and/or scientificskills (lab research) through elective classes, independent studies or extracurricular activities tomake yourself more marketable.
Here is a partial list of companies that hired international students who graduated from Canadian programs:❖ Scotia Bank ❖ Ernst and Young❖ Xerox❖ 3M Canada Company❖ MTV World❖ Thrifty Foods❖IBM Canada❖ Meyers Norris Penny Canada❖University Health Work❖ Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro❖ Peterbourogh Regional Health❖ Nestle Canada
 
 
 Canada Employment System
The first step in designing an effective job search strategy which will lead to employment in Canada is to clearly understand the setting in which you are operating. As a international professional or international  student, you  may not have had much experience job-hunting in your home country. Even if you have, you arelikely to find job-hunting in Canada is a different process. The differences are culturally based and, therefore, you may have to work very hard at overcomingthe natural inclination to conduct yourself as you would if you were looking for a job in your homecountry. Different cultures have different sensibilities. Be aware of the setting in which you areinterviewing.  Hineni Media blogs about it and  offers services  to assist you in your  Canada job search process.   Take  time to read some of this material before you begin your search.

Hineni Media Online Database of Canadian Employers

This database identifies those Online Database of Canadian Employers who have filed for work permit visas in the past,  employers who have recently filed the appropriate paperwork to sponsor an international student or foreign worker for visa or who have at least started the process by filing for the HRSDC. If you find an employer you are interested in, you can then contact them to send your resume. 

This is a starting point for you to determine which employers may be willing to sponsor your visa. There is no guarantee that this job will be available, or that this employer will sponsor you. Please tell your friends about this valuable resource. 

  • Identify the names and contact information for hiring managers with companies that have a history of sponsoring employees on employment visa.
  • You will know the employers willing to get you a work permit
  • You will know the companies willing to sponsor you
  • You will gain Canadian experience
  • You will find temporary or seasonal work sources
  • You will find leisure/vacation work sources
  • Use Online Database of Canadian Employers for International Professionals and quickly find the perfect sponsoring company.

 

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Settlement Resources: Online Access to comprehensive information and resources for moving to, working and settling in Canada.

Manitoba welcome host for guest workers in Canada

Programa de migracion provincial a Canada, algo a considerar

En dias pasados, por coincidencia, se publico un articulo del Toronto Sun, uno de los periodicos de mayor circulacion en todo Canada, que habla de como el programa provincial de migracion a Canada, funciona para quienes no estan dentro de la lista de profesiones de gran demanda (low skilled workers), y que a su vez, con el apoyo de empresas privadas, los aplicantes obtienen la visa de trabajo, un contrato temporal, y luego de unos meses, la residencia legal, pudiendo optar tambien por la ciudadania. Lo interesante es la opcion viable para personas poco opcionadas al programa federal (nacional), junto con la reduccion de tiempo de proceso. Lo que mas me llamo la atencion, aparte del articulo en si, son los comentarios dejados por “Canadienses”, con comentarios no tan agradables … juzguen ustedes mismo.

Pueden ver el articulo original en: http://www.thestar.com/news/investigations/article/720163–part-3-manitoba-welcome-host-for-guest-workers-in-canada

How to effectively obtain employment in Canada

Marketing yourself effectively in the language and style that employers understand is often the key to an international job seeker’s success in Canada. Many foreign job seekers may not know the best way to market themselves to a typical Canadian  employer. Here are five of the top tips to supercharge anyone’s job search in Canada:

Your CV Must Be in  “Canadian standard” – Canadian companies expect your Curriculum Vitae to be re-written as a standard “Canada-style” resume. Any other format will be confusing to the employer and could result in your resume being discarded. Canadian resumes should detail your education, employment history and achievements as in your CV, but you need to do that  in “Canadian English” spelling and grammar. Job seekers should have a good comand of English or French, both official languages in Canada and if knowing they should try   to use the correct Canadian terminologies for their profession as well. Using a distinctly Canadian spell-check program and researching similar Canadian technical terms online will help keep your document understandable. If your CV isn’t Canadian standard, you might as well not even bother applying; the Canadian employer will find a standard CV confusing and may not take the time to read it.

Be Proud Of Your Accomplishments – In a competitive job market, Canadian employers need a really good reason to hire you over a similarly-qualified applicant. You may not be used to boasting about your accomplishments, but in Canada your prior successes really count. Think about the last time you successfully completed a project or helped create a “happy-customer” transaction. Make a list of at least three success stories, and be prepared to tell the Canadian employer about them. Employers in Canada love to see statistics, too. List specific statistics related to your work accomplishments in your resume. This will really boost your resume’s credibility.

Keep Your Resume Concise And To The Point – There is an old Canadian saying too: time is money. This is no truer than when an employer is looking at your resume. A “Canadian Resume” should be no more than two pages long and be easy to read. Above all, do not state the same information twice. If you have performed the same job for a number of employers or if you have tended to work in the same industry job after job, try to rephrase the job descriptions or find new terms to describe your tasks. This keeps the reader interested, and the resume interesting!

Attach A Cover Letter And Make It Great – Cover Letters are a one page “soft” or friendly introduction to your resume in Canada, and the same principles of brevity in a resume must also be applied in a cover letter. Canadian cover letters are not personal letters of introduction, but instead highlight your professional skills and outline how you can contribute to the success of the organization you are applying to. And it isn’t just about being brief; you must be persuasive and to the point in your introduction. A cover letter is a sales tool… for you. Don’t be boring! Employers want dynamic employees, so don’t give them a reason not to interview you. You need to write your cover letter with the goal of enticing the reader – the employer – to find out more about you. A good cover letter will automatically give you a better chance of having your resume read and considered.

Be Yourself – Canadian employers are looking for a person who will be a good fit for the job. When you are applying for a job to Canada and are many miles away, it may be tempting to overstate your skill or expertise level just to tip reader’s interest in your favor. A good resume always clearly states your credentials and expertise for the position – but stays on the safe side of hyperbole. Employers may be able to find 100 job candidates who are suitable for the job but they are also looking for a ‘real’ person who can deliver the skills and talent that their resume promises.

Some of the challenges an international job seeker faces may be readily apparent, understandable, even universal – while others are not quite so obvious. To be successful in Canada you must have the job-search tools and the know-how to compete head-to-head successfully with an Canadian applicant.

If you would like more information about current Canada job news and more effective insider tips for landing a job in Canada as future or currently internationally trained immigrant, subscribe to www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org

How to find work in Winnipeg, Canada

In Manitoba it is each person’s responsibility to find a job. The way of looking for work may be quite different than in your home country. There are government and community agencies that will help you learn job search skills and help you find opportunities.

STEPS in your job search

  1. Job search skills: Your first step is to have a plan. By knowing where to go and what to do you will achieve your goal.
  2. Resumé, cover letter, application forms: These are your basic “tools” to tell employers the skills and experience that you can offer.
  3. Where to find jobs openings: Now that you’re ready you need to find an employer who’s ready to hire you. Get in touch with Canadian companies advertising employment opportunities.
  4. Job interview: Meeting your potential employer for the first time is the crucial moment. Work experience, language and culture all play a part in this one-on-one meeting.

Winnipeg is pretty accepting of new immigrants. You won’t be mistreated or anything. Also, if you are from certain European nations, you might have easier time. Winnipeg has a large population of Eastern European immigrants and people who are descended from Eastern Europeans, mostly Ukrainians and a significant number of Russians.

Also, keep in mind that Winnipeg is a blue-collar working-class and middle-class city. Don’t expect things like a lot of trendy nightclubs or five-star restaurants or things like that. There are a lot of good restaurants serving North American cuisine and various ethnic restaurants, but they are very causal places. The Employment outlook in all Canada will vary depending on your profession. Research type of business/position are you in.

The upsides to Winnipeg are that it is a pretty cheap city and pretty accepting of immigrants, it is certainly less expensive than most cities in European and it is cheaper than many cities in Canada and the US. Housing is pretty affordable. Today you can find someone  paying about $500 a month for pretty nice one bedroom apartment in an area within walking distance of a shopping center and was surrounded by a number of convenience stores and so on.

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www. Hinenimedia.memberlodg.org  has jobs lead info in all industries including retail jobs, restaurant jobs, bank jobs, internships and volunteer jobs, teen jobs, office jobs, part time jobs, seasonal jobs, summer jobs and many more. If you don’t find a job today, be sure to subscribe  soon as we’re always updating our database with great jobs leads.