Posts Tagged ‘ Employment-Based-Immigration ’

Foreign Worker:How can employment agencies help me find a job in Canada

How can employment agencies help me find a job in Canada?

Employment agencies are sometimes known as temp agencies. They can be a great way to get a new career started in CanadaEmployment agencies are almost always private companies.

Their job is to find you a job!  Employment agencies seldom offer jobs within their own organization. Instead, they specialize in placing applicants in other companies.

There are many different kinds of employment agencies.

Some agencies specialize in particular sectors or industries. For example, there are specific employment agencies for people working in medicine. There are employment agencies that specialize in finding temporary work for their applicants (temp agencies,) and agencies that specialize in finding permanent positions. Some employment agencies are referred to as “headhunters.”

They usually specialize in finding high-level and executive jobs for suitable clients. How employment agencies can help.  Newcomers to Canada often arrive with no contacts and no network for job hunting. This can be a barrier to finding fulfilling work. Employment agencies can help you to find a job in your field, gain experience and contacts, and jump-start a career faster than by networking. Remember, it’s their job to find you a job!

What to watch for?  You should never pay money to an employment agency up front. Employment agencies make money by charging employers to fill vacant positions. They do not charge job applicants. There are some headhunting firms that require payment from applicants, but only after suitable jobs have been found and started for their applicants.

Always make sure that any employment agency you choose to get involved with can actually help you get a job in your field. While many agencies specialize in certain industries, there are just as many that fill general positions that may not be helpful in starting a new  career in Canada.

You can search a directory of employment agencies in Canada here  or simply look for a job directly  here.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

30 Careers with 2010 High Growth in Canada

30 careers  with High 2010 Growth in Canada

1. Registered nurses
Minimum education or training: Associate degree
2. Home health aides
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
3. Customer service representatives
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
4. Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
5. Personal and home care aides
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
6. Retail salespersons
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
7. Office clerks, general
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
8. Accountants and auditors
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
9. Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants
Minimum education or training: Postsecondary vocational award
10. Postsecondary teachers
Minimum education or training: Doctoral degree
11. Construction laborers
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
12. Elementary school teachers, except special education
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
13. Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
14. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
15. Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
16. Executive secretaries and administrative assistants
Minimum education or training: Work experience in a related occupation
17. Management analysts
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s or higher degree, plus work experience
18. Computer applications software engineers

Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
19. Receptionists and information clerks

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
20. Carpenters
Minimum education or training: Long-term on-the-job training
21. Medical assistants
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
22. First-line supervisors/managers of office and administrative support workers
Minimum education or training: Work experience in a related occupation
23. Network systems and data communications analysts

Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree
24. Licensed practical and vocational nurses
Minimum education or training: Postsecondary vocational award
25. Security guards
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
26. Waiters and waitresses

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
27. Maintenance and repair workers
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
28. Physicians and surgeons
Minimum education or training: First professional degree
29. Child-care workers

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

30. Teacher assistants

Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2. Diaz, Marisol specialize in permanent, contract and contract-to-permanent employment resources for  seasonal, temporary, internships, summer jobs. Headquartered in Toronto, Ontario.  Marisol’s services Ontario and metropolitan GTA markets with additional technology contracting resources nationwide. For more information on Diaz, Marisol visit http://www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org/

Canadian companies that hired international profesionals and students

Finding a job as international profesional  takes hard work.  It’s a good idea to prepare for your job search before you leave for Canada. Getting ready for interviews, improving your English or French language skills, and getting in touch with a possible mentor   all may help in finding a job.
 Here are few tips:
First. Strong employment prospects for you as an international profesional and international student may be with organizations that have an international focus, such as the World Trade Organization, World Health Organization,World Bank or African Development Fund. Likewise, you may have more success with Canadian companies that have an international presence. Your international experience, language andcultural fluency make you very attractive to these organizations. In addition, if your Canadian work  authorization is delayed, you may be able to continue to work at one of their branches outside of  Canada. (ie: in your home country). Hineni Media Subscription site includes several  resources that name  Canadian companies with divisions throughout the world. Here you will find  a few:
Secondly, as an international profesional or international student you may find the job search process less difficult if you study technical subjects. High tech firms in Canada are desperate to hire skilled workers, particularly inthe areas of Systems Analysis and Programming, Engineering and Accounting. If you are not majoringin one of these areas, at least consider developing computer skills (programming, word processingand spreadsheet design, web development), quantitative skills (accounting, statistics and economics) and/or scientificskills (lab research) through elective classes, independent studies or extracurricular activities tomake yourself more marketable.
Here is a partial list of companies that hired international students who graduated from Canadian programs:❖ Scotia Bank ❖ Ernst and Young❖ Xerox❖ 3M Canada Company❖ MTV World❖ Thrifty Foods❖IBM Canada❖ Meyers Norris Penny Canada❖University Health Work❖ Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro❖ Peterbourogh Regional Health❖ Nestle Canada
 
 
 Canada Employment System
The first step in designing an effective job search strategy which will lead to employment in Canada is to clearly understand the setting in which you are operating. As a international professional or international  student, you  may not have had much experience job-hunting in your home country. Even if you have, you arelikely to find job-hunting in Canada is a different process. The differences are culturally based and, therefore, you may have to work very hard at overcomingthe natural inclination to conduct yourself as you would if you were looking for a job in your homecountry. Different cultures have different sensibilities. Be aware of the setting in which you areinterviewing.  Hineni Media blogs about it and  offers services  to assist you in your  Canada job search process.   Take  time to read some of this material before you begin your search.

Manitoba welcome host for guest workers in Canada

Programa de migracion provincial a Canada, algo a considerar

En dias pasados, por coincidencia, se publico un articulo del Toronto Sun, uno de los periodicos de mayor circulacion en todo Canada, que habla de como el programa provincial de migracion a Canada, funciona para quienes no estan dentro de la lista de profesiones de gran demanda (low skilled workers), y que a su vez, con el apoyo de empresas privadas, los aplicantes obtienen la visa de trabajo, un contrato temporal, y luego de unos meses, la residencia legal, pudiendo optar tambien por la ciudadania. Lo interesante es la opcion viable para personas poco opcionadas al programa federal (nacional), junto con la reduccion de tiempo de proceso. Lo que mas me llamo la atencion, aparte del articulo en si, son los comentarios dejados por “Canadienses”, con comentarios no tan agradables … juzguen ustedes mismo.

Pueden ver el articulo original en: http://www.thestar.com/news/investigations/article/720163–part-3-manitoba-welcome-host-for-guest-workers-in-canada

How to speed your Canada’s Immigration Application

As the country settles soon into a new year (2010), Canadian officials have set their sights on speeding up the immigration process, increasing the number of accepted applicants and strengthening  foreign credential recognition.

There are currently more than 900,000 immigration applications under review and, regardless of their category, the process can sometimes take more than five years,  so the best thing you can do to speed-up your immigration processing currently is this: get a temporary work  visa.   A temporary work visa for Canada (and especially for those occupations under pressure in Alberta and British Columbia .

My experience filling out documents lately has been that applications from foreigners with Canadian work visas are being processed at extraordinary speed. One client of mine received permanent residence within 10 months of applying — that is nearly a record!

So if you qualify for permanent residence, you may have the skills needed to qualify for a temporary work visa — it is well worth your effort to do so, as these applications seem to be getting fast-tracked.

Earning the right to live and work in Canada requires knowledge and technical expertise at many levels. You need to possess the required skills, and you will need guidance through the entire process once you are selected as suitable and required by an Canadian Employer. You must be able to speak English fluently.

Hineni Media database  has  been launched in order to offer a good value way of data matching skilled workers outside Canada, with Canadian employers. Many Canadian employers find the cost of international recruitment prohibitively expensive and full of red tape. Using Hineni Media database, you can contact the company directly and  they have the ability to see your CV / Resume online at their leisure, and at a low cost.

Hineni Database is also a resource linking you to some 1,000 organizations that offer internships in 14 sectors ranging from human rights and social service to sports and media. It contains internships from Canadian companies large and small, local and international, and exposes students to opportunities they wouldn’t find anywhere else.  This is a subscription service available at   http://www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org

Canada – Visas and Work Permits

Canada – Visas and Work Permits
 
Are you wanting to work or re-locate to the Canada? Do you need to check if you need a work permit or do you want to apply now? Do you want to find out if you need a visa to be in the Canada? Here, Hineni have provided you with some information on working in Canada and have teamed up with its membersite  who can offer you further advice and assistance with any questions and queries you may have.
 
 What are Visas and Work Permits?
Firstly, here is an explanation of what a visa, a work permit and immigration actually is.
A visa is an official authorization appended to a passport, permitting entry into and travel within a particular country or region.
– A work permit is a generic term for a legal authorization, which allows a person to take employment. It is most often used in reference to instances where a person is given permission to work in a country where one does not hold citizenship,
– Immigration is the act of immigrating; the passing or coming into a country for the purpose of permanent residence.
It will depend on how long you want to go for, why you want to go and certain other factors as to which of the visas you must apply for.
 
 
Types of Visas
Canada offers a range of immigration opportunities and probably does more than most other countries to encourage skilled workers to move to Canada. There are four main categories for visas and there is also an option for a work permit:
Skilled Worker Class – The Skilled Worker Visa for Canada is the most popular way of applying for migration to Canada. This allows you to enter Canada with the right to work without first needing to find a job. Find out if you qualify by using a Canada Skilled Worker Points Calculator.
Business Class – Canadian Business Immigration offers three different Canada Business Visa categories for business immigration to Canada for potential migrants wishing to Invest or start a business in Canada.
Family Class – Canadian citizens and permanent residents living in Canada, 18 years of age or older, may sponsor close relatives or family members who want to become permanent residents of Canada.
Citizenship – Although you can’t apply for Canadian citizenship until you have lived in Canada for at least three years, you can be thinking about what it means from the moment you arrive.
Work Permits – A work permit for Canada can only be obtained if you have an offer of employment before applying for your Canadian work visa. Canada seeks to attract temporary skilled workers to fill positions that Canadian employers are currently having difficulty to fill by a Canadian Permanent Resident or Citizen.
Canada Visit Visa – Visit Canada with a Canadian Tourist Visa. A Canadian Visitor Visa will allow you to visit Canada for up to 6 months.
 
Visa Exemptions
 
Visas are required by everyone visiting Canada except the following for stays of up to six month:
1. nationals of countries; Britain, Australia,  USA, Other EU members and Japan.
2. nationals of EU countries (except Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovak Republic, who do require a visa);
3. nationals of Andorra, Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Botswana, Brunei, French Overseas Possessions and Territories, Greenland, Guernsey, Hong Kong (SAR), Iceland, Israel (National passport holders only), Jersey, Korea (Rep), Liechtenstein, Monaco, Namibia, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Switzerland and the Vatican City.
4. those visiting Canada who, during that visit, also visit the USA or St Pierre & Miquelon (a French Overseas Territory) and return directly to Canada as visitors.
 
 Types of Visa and Cost
Visitor: C$75 (single-entry); C$150 (multiple-entry). Family: C$400 (for families of six or more persons). Transit: gratis. Transit visas are necessary for all nationals who require a visitor visa. Employment: C$150 (individual); C$450 (group of three or more). Student: C$125. Prices are subject to frequent change.
  
Validity
Up to six months depending on circumstances of individual applicant.
 
Further Information
Please contact your local Embassy or Consulate or High Commission to find out further information about visas.  
 Hineni Media collects and provide diverse employment information, including employment procedures,
   working visas and Canada employment trends.

Where to find job opportunities In Canada?

What can you do when you have to find a job fast? It’s not easy, but there are steps you can take to expedite your job search.

Job opportunities can be found anywhere from a Help Wanted ad placed in a store window, to ads online or in Canada’s major newspaper, to major employers who hire “head-hunters” to find a new company official. Job fairs Increasingly, employers are working with Canada wide or Provincial Labour and Immigration and some employment service providers to hold “job fairs.” Immigrants are invited to meet employers. To know what job fairs are happening, regularly check the newspaper section Events.

Monster or Workpolis are free website that shows you what jobs are available daily in Canadian Provinces by Industry. It also gives detailed information including qualification and language requirements. Workopolis.com is the job website most Canada wide employers use to advertise job openings not all but is something.

Recruiters Some companies – particularly those with IT, office or accounting needs – hire a staffing, or placement, agency to find employees. These agencies advertise positions or seek out people whose skills meet the needs of employers. You should contact these employment agencies and have them add your name and work experience to their database. They CANNOT charge you any fee.

‘Hidden’ job market

It is said that most Canadian employers do not advertise when they have job openings. That is why we refer to the “hidden” job market.

To find opportunities you must “network.” That means doing things such as talking to people you know to find out who is hiring, contacting employers directly, attending job fairs, contacting groups involved in your field of work. ‘

Networking’

Networking means making social contacts. This way you can hear about unadvertised jobs, and employers can hear about you. Here are some methods: Get to know people in your neighbourhood and in your industry or profession. Talk to employment and professional counsellors, employers, and colleagues. By talking to people you will also come to understand your industry and what businesses look for in new employees. Join professional associations. Subscribe to their newsletters. Attend professional events and meetings. Attend public meetings and community events. Give and collect business cards. Contact Canadian employers directly, use HM Major Employment Companies Directory is a content website that lists all employers in the province,what they do and their contact informacion.

The Job Interview

Employers place a lot of importance on meeting a prospective employee. An interview could be an informal conversation or it could be a structured format with pre-determined questions in front of a panel of interviewers. The employer reviews paper applications. The next step is to call some candidates in for an interview. This could happen quickly or it make take a company weeks to decide who to interview. Be prepared to listen, answer and ask — in English. Have a positive attitude about yourself. Know that your skills and personal qualities would be an asset to the employer. The best way to learn about interviews is by taking advantage of advice offered by immigrant employment service agencies.

Regional resource for job seekers

Ontario, Manitoba, Vancouver , Calgary and Montreal , etc all Canada have many employment offices across the province. Free services include career counselling, information about job openings and the use of computers for resumé writing and Internet job search. Also, they can give information about government employment assistance programs. If you are an immigrant who lives in rural area you are advised to go to Employment of that Province.

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