Archive for November, 2010

How to find a job by yourself in Quebec, Canada

Well the truth is that it is not easy to find a job in Quebec, Canada

Unemployment is high in all Canada and employers try to cut costs . First, there’s the matter of a work permit. The Canada’s neighbor recession has made under-the-table jobs hard to find, and if you get caught working illegally the punishment is dire: immediate deportation plus a five-year ban on visiting here but probably most of Western Europe. With all the legal loopholes and exchange programs available, there’s no point risking it.

Before you start your search for a job in Quebec, ask yourself a few questions: Do you want to work short term (less than four months) or long term? What marketable skills do you have? Do you require a job in a particular field, or would you settle for almost anything? Can you go it alone, or do you want to bring your partner with you? Are you adaptable, resilient, curious? Finally, do you speak some French or have time to learn before you go?

Paperwork is very complicated for the employer : each new employee (even for a short period of time) must be declared to many different organization, each of them managing one of the many social benefits (see the anatomy of a paycheck)
It is even harder for employees who are not Canadian citizens or at least in the Treaty Nafta Visa. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind
Job contracts : there are basically two sorts : CDD (Contrat à Durée Déterminée), in which you are hired for a certain time (for instance 6 months) and which can be renewed only once and CDI (Contrat à Durée Indéterminée), where there is no limit and it is rather difficult for the employer to end the contract hence you can apply for your residence while at this type of contract ; CDI are, of course, especially difficult to find ; to work and be paid by the hour, a worker has to be registred or have a license as “travailleur indépendant” with Canada Revenue (and it does not make sense for a limited number of hours). More about being an independent contractor or business immigrant.

Combining Work and Study
Studying in Quebec is another way to get the right to work. If you register independently instead of going through an exchange program, college, or art school, tuition is less than $2000 a year. Even if you do go through an exchange program, you can still work. Simply put, students and teachers can work up to 10-20 hours a week during the school year; 20-39 during the summer. All other jobs follow the 20-39 pattern. Of course, teaching pays better than almost any other part-time job, so the limit on hours is not such a problem–especially when you discover how inexpensive Quebec can be. (Writers on Quebec seldom mention the ridiculously low college tuition, the cheap to reasonable rent, and the public transportation that eliminates the need for a car.)
Career-Track Jobs
If you already have a career in North America, there are two other ways to work in Quebec. First, if you work for a multinational company, you can request a transfer to Quebec or Canada. Your company takes care of the details.

If you’re a high-tech wizard, super-executive, or an entertainer, your skills may be so in demand that the right Canadian-Quebec based company will be willing to handle all the paperwork for you.

Tricks of the Trade

Not enough money to live on while waiting for a job? If you’re going to be an independent student in Quebec, only apply to universities that make you eligible for financial aid. (Contact Immigration Canada details for international students and  for specifics.) Then apply for a student loan. If you can’t get financial aid, try a scholarship or grant. If all else fails, postpone your trip to Quebece long enough to get a job and save up. If you absolutely can’t wait, of course, you could live off credit cards. (Note: bring some traveler’s checks if you want, but the easiest way to spend your American or Euro money in Quebec  is with a credit card or via ATMs. some Canadian ATMs are free and they convert dollars from your American account into francs at a better exchange rate–with no commission–than you’d find anywhere else. If you have a Visa debit card or one with the Cirrus logo on the back, all you need to use Canadian ATMs is a four-digit PIN code.)
Cultural and Practical Job Tips

Applying for the job: Follow the Canadian( Quebec) resume format and get yours written or at least corrected by an educated native speaker of Canadian-French. If you can’t find any in your town, ask the consulate or scan the web for a qualified translator to do it for you. A more low-budget option is to surf the web for educated Canadian-French people, offering to write or correct their resumes in English in exchange for yours in French. In Quebec cover letters are not (gulp) hand written. So type your letter, have a French person check it, then use your nicest handwriting and a good black pen on unlined paper to sign is requested. Photos are not necesary but you can count with linkedin, or your Facebook account for it.  Social Media is a big boom up here. For resumes, the standard format is wallet size or a little smaller.

Take advantage of every possible contact that you have, from friends, colleagues and classmates. Even the most casual acquaintances can sometimes point you towards a potential job lead. Persistence and confidence are vital ingredients to a successful job search.

 

More to come…..

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Welcome to Canada: but how is your French?

Put your French language skills to work. These links will help you find language-related jobs and information on working in francophone areas of Canada like Quebec, New Brunswick and Halifax. Isn’t it about time you started making some money back from all those French classes?

Job-hunting in Quebec
In the April 2003 issue of  Metro Toronto, a  free-lance journalist on the education  give 10 valuable tips about finding a job in Quebec :

” pinpoint the hot sectors “, namely telecom, high tech, hotels, restaurants, secretarial and teaching
” wake up and smell the café “, it is a very competitive market
” work around the system ” and look for firms that cater to expatriates
” target new subsidiaries ” of  France or U.S. firms
” become a known quantity ” and start with a temporary contract
” redo that franglais CV ” : your resumé (CV) must be palatable for the French
” forget the thank-you note ” after the interview (but do not dress too casually)
” don’t knock open doors ” and join French-Canadian-speaking organizations, groups, clubs and meet ups. 
” don’t get stuck in a rut ” and try different searching methods
” try temping “, it’s less difficult (if you’re a US or EU citizen)

WHERE TO LOOK FIRST?

  • Teaching
    Translation
    Lists of translation companies  and freelancers, plus many helpful resources
  • Bilingual Jobs
  • Ann whitten: Canadian recruiter for temps in Canada, plus info on writing your CV, working as a temp, etc. French only.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Empresas que están contratando personal temporal en Canada

Empresas que están contratando personal temporal en Canada; ¡Busca desde ya!

Cada año da la impresión de que las tiendas ponen las decoraciones de las fiestas más temprano que al año anterior. Un día los estudiantes se están llevando los cuadernos de las estanterías de artículos escolares y al siguiente hay un monton de cosas para la fiesta de Hallowen.  En Canada noviembre y diciembre, la gente hace muchisimas compras.

Para poder manejar el movimiento de dinero extra, las empresas contratan más trabajadores. Y si has buscado empleo alguna vez, sabes que ese proceso lleva varias semanas. Uno no se postula para un empleo y lo contratan el mismo día. Por esa razón las empresas inician por anticipado la búsqueda de trabajadores para las fiestas.

En otras palabras, si estás interesado en un empleo de temporal, deberías estar  buscando ahora mismo. Ya sea que quieras algo de dinero extra o desees darte a conocer en una empresa, un trabajo de temporal podría ser justo lo que necesitas.

Así que te traemos esta lista de empresas Canadienses que están contratando a gente actualmente:

Thirty One gifts; Scentsy; Regal,  Avon; Mary Kay; Creative Memories
Industria: ventas directas
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 75
Ejemplos de puestos: vendedor al por menor, representante de ventas interno
Ubicación: en todo el país

Rogers Wireless
Industria: telecomunicaciones (ventas al por menor)
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 200
Ejemplos de puestos: vendedor, gerente de tienda
Ubicación: en todo el país

Bright Ideas
Industria: servicios de oficina
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 150
Ejemplos de puestos: diseñador para las fiestas, decorador para las fiestas, ayudante para las fiestas
Ubicación: en todo el país

Canadian– CanEquity Mortgage.
Industria: préstamos hipotecarios, bienes raíces, finanzas, tecnología de la información
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: analista financiero, analista tasador, consultor de préstamos, analista senior, desarrollo de aplicaciones
Ubicación: Vancouver, Calgary, Ontario and Nova Scotia

Car Canada
Industria: venta de vehículos al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: ventas, técnico automotriz
Ubicación: en todo el país

Elavon, 1st Data, Moneris, TD Merchant Services, Chase Paymentec and Global
Industria: servicios comerciales / finanzas
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 200
Ejemplos de puestos: empleado de ventas externo
Ubicación: en todo el país

ToqueWear; Urban Outfitters, Joe  Fresh
Industria: ventas al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 400
Ejemplos de puestos: vendedor de tienda, gerente de tienda, empleado de procesamiento de centro de distribución (de temporada), encargado de materiales de centro de distribución, subgerentes
Ubicación: en todo el país

Apotex, AEterna Zentaris, Bioniche Life Sciences; Ambrilia Biopharma, Cangene and  QLT
Industria: biotecnología
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 700
Ejemplos de puestos: empleado de procesamiento de células, empleado encargado de materiales, empleado de garantía de calidad y control de calidad, recursos humanos, instalaciones, ingeniería, apoyo y cumplimiento regulatorio de tecnología de la información, asuntos gubernamentales, validación, asuntos clínicos, asuntos médicos, red APH, desarrollo de productos, marketing
Ubicación: Manitoba, Ontario


Technology Platforms Inc; TR Technology Inc; Vaxxine.Com

Industria: productos de redes/computación
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 115
Ejemplos de puestos: ingeniero senior de software, ingeniero de pruebas, ingeniero de sistemas de campo, gerente principal de cuentas, gerente regional de cuentas
Ubicación: en todo el país (Ontario, Quebec, etc)

Canadian Tire Limited ;Loblaws;Husdon Bay; Zellers;The Bay
Industria: ventas al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 400
Ejemplos de puestos: gerente de ventas al por menor, subgerente, gerente de turno
Ubicación: Memphis y el sudeste
Nav Canada, Conference Services; Dmg World Media and Cgi Conferences Groups & Incentives Inc
Industria: servicios para convenciones
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 250
Ejemplos de puestos: coordinador de ventas, gerentes de cuentas, empleado de servicios para exposiciones
Ubicación: Ontario, Ottawa; Quebec

H&M
Industria: venta de ropa y accesorios de moda al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 1,000
Ejemplos de puestos: asesores de ventas a tiempo completo y a tiempo parcial, gerentes de departamento, encargados de mercadotecnia visual
Ubicación: Ontario, Vancouver ( all Canada)

Hewlett Packard
Industria: tecnología
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 2,000
Ejemplos de puestos: especialista de ventas, gerente de ventas, servicios de gestión de aplicaciones, desarrolladores y arquitecto de .NET/SQL, desarrolladores/programadores/gestores de aplicaciones, ingeniero de sistemas, arquitecto de sistemas/soluciones, consultor de tecnología, analista comercial
Ubicación: en todo el país

City Cheft ; Golda’s Kitchen , Williams Sonoma, and  Ikea Canada
Industria: ventas al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 1,000
Ejemplos de puestos: gerente de tienda, subgerente de tienda, integrante de equipo de ventas al por menor
Ubicación: en todo el país

Marketlink Canada
Industria: tercerización de ventas y marketing
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 1,000
Ejemplos de puestos: vendedor al por menor a tiempo parcial
Ubicación: en todo el país

Trillium Human Resources
Industria: atención médica
Cantidad de puestos específicos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: enfermero, fisioterapeuta, reclutador
Ubicación: en todo el país

The Brick: Furniture, Mattress, Sofa Stores
Industria: venta de muebles al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: aprendiz de gerente de ventas
Ubicación: en todo el país

Just Joan Marketing Services and Aspen Marketing Services
Industria: marketing y ventas por internet
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: analista, desarrollador web, consultor de ventas
Ubicación: Muskoka y Toronto


Tootsies and CAT & Caterpillar clothing

Industria: ventas al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 800
Ejemplos de puestos: gerente de distrito, gerente de tienda, subgerente de tienda, especialista en seguridad de tiendas, empleado de ventas al por menor
Ubicación: en todo el país

OEC Group; Mill Creek Motor Freight and Ryder Canada
Industria: transporte y logística
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: chofer, técnico, gerente de servicios de alquiler
Ubicación: en todo el país

Chrysler Canada
Industria: venta de vehículos al por menor
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 100
Ejemplos de puestos: ventas, técnico automotriz
Ubicación: en todo el país

Sunlife
Industria: finanzas
Cantidad de puestos disponibles: 10,000
Ejemplos de puestos: cajero, empleado de banca personal, empleado de banca telefónica, especialista de servicios de préstamos, especialista de atención al cliente, consultor de hipotecas para viviendas
Ubicación: en todo el país

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Finding Work in Canada

Looking for Work?
 

When it comes to finding a job in Canada, for some people it is as easy as visiting one of the major job portals (Monster, workopolis.com, cooljobscanada.com etc). For international workers, however, it is not as simple. More often than not, applying for a position listed on these web portals as an international worker is futile. Companies are looking for Canadians residents and/or citizens, and are not willing to wait for candidates to come to Canada to hire them.

Because we deal primarily with international workers, we often have to act as an intermediary on their behalf. We contact the employers, set up the virtual interviews, and another  take care of all of the processing and filing requirements to bring the workers to  Canada. Beyond even the language barrier, employers in Canada tend to be so bombarded by offers from other agencies, independant workers, and every-day walkins, that they rely on companies such as ourselves to screen workers and take care of the details.

For independant international workers, this process can tend to be much more complicated. How does one find an employer without working with a recruitment firm? Well, let’s find out!

Don’t Use This Method!    In Canada , Vancouver is our hospitality, Tourism and Temporary jobs kingdom. Then is BC , Quebec and lastly AB (Alberta)
 
Food Service Employers: Cooks, waitress, bartenders, chefs, banquet, bar staff, chefs, servers, hotel jobs, resort jobs, entry level, supervisory and management positions.

Check this example: Hospitality Employers Alternative Jobs

Step One: Resume
Your First Step should be to analyze your skill sets, and make a short resume or summary of qualifications. A resume for candidacy as an international or overseas worker is a bit different from the typical resume. It should answer the following questions:

•What is your name?
•How old are you?
•What types of jobs have you held?
•What type of positions are you interested in?
•What skills do you posess?
•What is your level of English or French? (Beginner, Intermediate, Fluent, Fluent-Professional)
•What kind of training/education do you posess?
•Have you ever visited/worked in Canada?
•What is your Contact information?
In the interest of time and paper cost, do your best to minimize the resume to one page, or two for more technical pursuits. This document is more of an introduction. Further information can be divulged at the interview stage (if the company requires an interview.

When choosing a job category, make sure that it is something that you are interested in, and qualified to do. Employers typically utilize international or overseas workers as a last result, or as a cost-cutting measure. If they are able to find a more qualified candidate for less/the same amount of money within their own country, they typically will go with that candidate. For unskilled jobs, a complete and exact work history is typically not as important as the skills a candidate may posess. For example, target your resume to match the job that you are interested in. For someone interested in working as a Cook/Chef, having “Cooking- 5 years” on a resume is a bigger help than showing prior work history as a accounter or financial analyst. Don’t get me wrong – a good work history is a great thing to have, but one can always risk looking overqualified for a job.
 

Step Two: Job Search
As in any job search, it is important for international trained candidates to set up a list of potential employers. Start with the best possible scenario – the highest paying employer in the province with the lowest cost of living. The last employer on your list should be the one with the lowest salary. This is to be a last result – simply a way to get your foot in the door.

Do you have a preferred location? Many people that have never been in Canada still have a place they have always wanted to visit, or a province that they had heard was beautiful. Our company is based in Toronto, which is often sought by candidates from candidates in the North and from Southern hemispheres. Some candidates enjoy larger cities, and focus their job search on British Columbia, Alberta, and Quebec. Candidates interested in saving money on the Cost of Living will often look for more inner cities or semi rural locales, including Kitchener (Cambridge, Waterloo), New Brunswick, PEI, and Saskatchewan.

Once you have settled on a location, go ahead and search for local and regional Job Search portals in the area. Some national sites such as Eluta, bestjobs.ca, workopolis, Jobsincanada and Monster can also be used as a reference point. As we mentioned, these types of resources do not make a good basis for a job search, as they are primarily targeted at Canadian based workers. Smaller Job Search Portals may be of more use, as they typically have more unskilled-labor types of positions.

Local and Regional newspapers often have an online classifieds section that can aid in a job search. Many employers are required by law to post advertisements in these periodicals prior to hiring international workers. Posts that are larger in size, and include the name of the company, number of jobs available, a reference number or Job ID, and instructions to send in a resume are generally very good indications that the company is either an employer, or a recruiter working for the employer. Take Notice, however: Applying for these positions will not get you the job – they are used as a measure to ensure that there are no domestic workers available to fill the position.  If you find a company such as this, search for their direct contact information via Linkedin or Google.

Another great way to find positions is to locate the corporate branch or management office of large chains. Examples are Tim Hortons, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, Dixie Lee Fried Chicken or Mary Brown’s Fried Chicken,  Theme & Amusement Parks like Marine Land in Niagara Falls, and others. Contact the Human Resources department, and request information about international recruitment. If they have a recruiter that they work with, contact them to learn more about the application process.

Step Three: Contact
When making contact with an employer, the first steps are crucial. If you are not sure about you English spelling and grammar, have a friend or colleague take a look at anything that you send out. Set up a letter that describes the position you are interested in, where you are from, and when you are wanting to come to Canada. Provide your contact information and an email address where you can easily be reached.

Don’t depend on every employer to answer you. If you get an answer from even one-fifth of the employers on your list, then you should feel fairly accomplished!

Start towards the middle of your list, and work your way up. It’s good to have some practice. After every attempt, your pitch and technique will be that much better. When you are ready to contact the employer at the top of your list, your will be at the top of your game! Save the employers towards the bottom of the list until later. It’s rare for international applicants but you don’t want a bunch of job offers from employers that you are not that interested in, only to turn them down. It is best to keep up a reputation with these companies for the future, in case things don’t work out with your favored employers.

If you will be making phone calls, write a short “script”. Make sure it is something that you will be comfortable reading, and that it will not sound ‘rehearsed’. This is only to be used as a reference. The last thing that you need is someone catching on that you’re reading your responses off of a piece of paper.

You need to have a resume ready. Companies  and Job Portals will often require a resume. Have one available in an electronic format for easy distribution. The electronic version should have little to no formatting (bold or italicized text, underlining, etc).

Final Preparation
If you have found an employer that has worked with international or overseas workers in the past, and can handle all of the processing and filing requirements, then you are good to go. If you are having trouble finding an employer, or find one that is not sure of how to proceed, sometimes it may be in your best interests to contact a international recruitment specialist or firm. International recruitment worker specialists are often freelancers that have dealt with international or overseas employment firms and/or staffing agencies, and choose to help candidates or employers on an individual basis. Larger firms have the manpower and the resources to take care of any needs that may arise, but often charge larger processing and filing fees.

When looking for help, make sure that the company you contact has experience in dealing with international or overseas  workers. The last thing you need is someone ‘winging it’ and causing your paperwork to be delayed or even denied.

Talk to the company representative, and see if they have a local affiliate in your country. Often this is a recruitment firm that has partnered with Canadians company, and can provide additional information. The rates with the affiliate may be a little higher, but it will be easier for you to get placed into a group of workers headed to Canada. This will help with processing times, and minimize the paperwork needed to get to Canada.

If you have any further trouble, feel free to contact us for a  consultation. Through our database we can help you find an employer, process the paperwork, and help with all of the processing and filing requirement with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) ;  LaborImmigration Canada, and other regulatory branches of the Canadian  Government.

Other than that, we wish you the best! Stay tuned for additional tutorials and guides!!

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Working in Canada – Looking for employment from outside Canada

Canada has a wealth of employment opportunities for Recreation , leisure, outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers. Parks, resorts, conservation and wildlife areas are a few options available. There are career opportunities, as well as temporary or seasonal jobs, with a wide range of jobs. Positions have a variety of responsibilities requiring a diverse set of skills ranging from cashiers, to field workers to managers. Students are often sought for seasonal positions.
 
 
 
Parks and conservation areas hire summer employees for interpretation, assisting visitors, booking campsites and a broad range of other jobs. Biology and environmental students have the opportunity to assist in wildlife or ecology studies. If your looking to land a job at one of Canada’s numerous resorts, the variety of opportunities ranges from hospitality management, to cooking, serving, cleaning or even general handy work. If you have the skills (certification is usually key) you might want to apply for the best job we know of – guideing in the outdoors. Whether rafting, canoeing, backpacking or climbing, getting paid for what you love to do, has just gotta be it!

 
Employment – By ProvinceAlberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Yukon Territories

Employment by CategoryEmployment – General
Employment Web Sites – Outdoors and Resorts
  • Cyber-Sierra – Excellent site for outdoor related jobs
  • EEP – Great resource for environmental career information
  • Environmental Jobs – Very good resource for finding outdoor employment
  • Outdoor Action Guide – From one of the pioneers, definitive outdoor information on the internet – a career guide!
Guides and Outfitters
Lands and Forests
Nature, Environment and Ecology
Parks
Resorts, Snowboarding/Ski Hills
Retail
Student Exchange Programs
Tourism
Tree Planting

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Getting a Job Sponsored Visa to Canada or Finding a Job once there (I)

Having chosen to do what is known as skilled migration, a friend enlisted an immigration agent to submit  his visa application. In enlisting the help of an agent only to advise him and submit  his application for a visa, he did a very independent move. The process cost 3000$CA and took  close to four years and once he got here the real work of finding a job started.

For many, like himself, three years can be a long wait particularly as you don’t know if your application is going to be successful or not. The alternative to this  is a job sponsorship visa. This is by far the quickest way as the process can take as little as 9 weeks and having a job to come to solves all the waiting and job hunting stress.

Whilst based in the DR he tried to get directly sponsored by an Marketing technology company, (my friend’s profession), but in his experience they weren’t in themselves very forthcoming. Since living here he have found that most companies outsource their overseas recruitment.

There is a skills shortage here, particularly but by no means only, in the medical or health profession, information technology and trades. Listed on the official  Occupations in Demand are, to give a sample, Anesthetists, Nurses, Civil Engineers, Dentists, Hospital Pharmacists, Health Technologies, Medical Laboratory, Technologies, Audiologist, Radiography, Rehabilitation Medicine,Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine TechnologiesPersonal and home care aides,  OT, Computer software engineers, systems software, Network and computer systems administrators, Brick layers, Plumbers, Welders, Plasters ……the list goes on. (for a copy contact details are given below).

With trades there is a huge shortage of apprentices and little home trained skilled workers growing up in the trade profession due to the way the training is organized. So if you are exceptionally skilled but 45 or over this is a good visa option in Canada. You could come and train tradespeople. There may be some options available to you under the  Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) Scheme. What happens here is that with the help of a specialist migration company ( email me I know  a reputable one: email: hinenisyndicator@gmail.com e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) and our database you could be matched up with an employer who is seeking to recruit someone with your type of skills (trade). The employer may well be able to sponsor you to migrate.

Skills assessment forms and sponsorship assessment forms do tend to frighten people off as for all visa types but selection is based on experience or qualifications or a mixture of both depending on the nature of the job. It is possible to cross over on several categories and produce a mixture of supportive application evidence. For example, a plumber by trade may currently be working in another job but can apply using all his experience. In a portfolio demonstrating ability, evidence can range from customer recommendations, to photos of jobs done, as well as written references, depending on the nature of the employer/industry you are hoping to be sponsored by.

As with all visa types ask for advice and keep an open mind. Give as much information about the nature of your experience, background and knowledge of your skills as well as qualifications. Formal qualifications aren’t the only way for all professions.

Talking to an Immigration Agent, it is clear that companies struggle to get themselves ready to sponsor people, even though they desperately need to bring in skilled workers. To sponsor someone companies need to: offer a good salary, provide a moving package, write a good solid contract with a job outline and description, they have to prove their commitment to training existing Canadian residents, produce various information about themselves as an organization and be of a certain size in number. For many this has been hard work in the past but is now becoming essential and an easier process.

 
Looking for Work Once Here
One of the problems independent or sponsored by relatives new immigrants encounter is finding work once here. I picked up a job teaching (the field of work I’ve been in for 3 years apart from my consulting) in an non profit institution, without too much trouble. It does on average however, take up to six months to get a first job here.

To avoid too much disappointment it is worth enlisting with a honest Employer’s database  and  as many recruitment agents as possible, as well as checking job ads in the papers. For searching for general work Job Network is the government agency for job searching and there is the weekly newspapers advertising jobs ( www.Torontojobs.ca) . The best website we’ve found for professional, trade and general local jobs list is Hineni Database  www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org  and Seek www. poss.ca. For a list of  recruitment agencies: www.addeco.ca

Follow  here 

 “Getting a Job Sponsored Visa to Canada or Finding a Job once there   ” PART II

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Getting a Job Sponsored Visa to Canada or Finding a Job once there (II)

Getting the Job
Having overseas work experience recognized by local employers can be difficult at start.  Something I myself realized is that there are different ways to build a career, some countries enable you to specialize in job function and expect more general experience in terms of industry knowledge. For example, an IT project Manager in Europe can work for a Digital T.V company, then consultant for a Government Agency and then work in telecommunications. Transferable skills are software engineering, architecture, methodology and project management skills. Here in Ontario however, it was deemed important to be specialized in job function and industry e.g. an IT manager in the Mining Sector or telecommunications. This is worth being aware of but don’t be put off — sell yourself on your ability to adapt.

It is important to present a competitive and update  C.V (resume) and take on tips about how to prepare for a job interview/ ways to best present yourself. The style and expectations here could be different to where you are from. I’ve post tips about job interview. Be willing to answer questions that may hint at your lack of local business/industry knowledge. A US  Financial Insurance Analysist found himself hearing, “You don’t know our local customers, area and business.” This was frustrating as in his work history he had regularly worked with “international/unknown” customers overseas and in off shore operations. Again, emphasis your adaptability and demonstrated experience of working with unknown/new customers.

Another typical problem is that recruiters for Canadian companies don’t necessarily know the companies you’ve worked for in your home country, even if they are big names. These obstacles can be overcome and responded to assertively in the interview or if feeling deflated, with a follow-up email.

There is a very exact and proper way of writing a local C.V (resume)  suited to catch the eye of  Canadian recruitment staff. It tends to be detailed with key words, positions and responsibilities and any budgets you’ve been responsible for. Middle and senior management in many sectors are very involved with budgets and finance.

Since even locally most companies now outsource their recruitment to agencies and work on contract and subcontract basis. The best way to approach independent job hunting is to register with an Employer’s Database and/or  meet as many recruitment agents in your field of work as possible (they don’t charge you a fee). Get help with tailoring your C.V. (resume).   The best way to do this is to find a local recruitment agency who is specialized in helping new immigrants or specialized in your field and will take the time to help you.

It’s normal to have several interviews both with the recruitment agency and the company that is hiring. My friend took a job on a short contact to get his foot in the door. The first step was a step down the career ladder but once he had more local knowledge, confidence and ability to build a network within his industry he quickly got back to where he was.

Qualifications recognition
It is worth for some professionals to have qualifications formally recognised/translated into the Canadian equivalent. It can improve your chances of working in the profession in which you are qualified e.g. teaching, nursing, electrics, engineering, IT.  There is not  Free Government Assessment of Qualifications, but this site is worth checking: http://www.credentials.gc.ca/

If you have trade qualifications in engineering, construction, metalwork, electrical or catering, the Trades Recognition Canada for Overseas provides this service. Trades & Apprentice   Recognition Canada, World Education Services   provides a  service for assessment of all overseas professional and technical qualifications — their website is worth a visit. www.wes.org/ca/

 
Settling In & Networking
With one at least  one Canadian born outside of  Canada, there’s a lot of people here who have done the big move or are currently in same boat doing the same journey. This makes getting started easier and building a network simpler. In addition,  there is continual positive propaganda to encourage multiculturalism and acceptance of new comers into Canadian Society.

For more information about Job sponsorship opportunities and list of skills in demand: www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org  or email hinenisyndicator@gmail.com   
©Marisol Diaz