Posts Tagged ‘ Visas de trabajo hacia Canada ’

International Profesionals in Canada: 10 high-paying jobs that don’t require a degree

International Profesionals in Canada: 10 high-paying jobs that don’t require a degree 

In a lot of ways, college is a great idea, for personal well-being, society, and of course, your career. But going to college doesn’t necessarily mean that you will make more money than if you hadn’t. There are many reasons why people skip college. Maybe it will save money, or maybe you think the business of higher education is a self-made fortune or scheme.

Either way, careers abound that allow you to make money without a degree. Lots of people who have these jobs also have a degree and working these jobs doesn’t mean one must forfeit college altogether, but you can line you pockets while working around the system.

Canada Employer’s database has a list of well-paying jobs you can skip college for, researched and based on statistics at http://www.jobfutures.org/ , but we’ve added a few of our own. By the way: Bounty hunters can earn up to $138,000 a year, tree trimmers average $32,090, makeup artists can average $45,000, and truck drivers can make $66,000. College is great, but isn’t for everyone. Plus, even $32K is pretty darn good when exactly none of that money has to be sacrificed for student loan debt!

1. Nuclear Power Reactor Operator: $79,100

This job requires highly-specialized skills such as understanding aspects of engineering, physics and troubleshooting. So if you are disciplined and capable enough to learn math and science outside the classroom, $79K a year certainly makes this worth looking into. The title is enough to impress even the most thoughtful of highbrow linguists. Of course, the world’s best-know holder of that title is Homer Simpson.

2. Landscape Architect: $65, 910

Although in 49 states a landscape architect is required to have a license, you don’t need to go to a four-year college to become one. Another lucrative option in this field involves freelance architecture. Either way, you get to drop mad knowledge about horticulture and exercise your artistic muscles while you get messy in the garden and make some good, hard cash.

3. Director of Security: $62,400

This role is often referred to as the Chief Security Officer (CSO), and it means exactly what it sounds like: the CSO is responsible for an organization’s entire security posture, both the physical aspect and operating the digital system. You get there by first being an assistant and then working your way up to Director of Security. Much better than being a bouncer, eh?

4. Air Traffic Controller (pictured): $60,200

Even though you don’t need a degree to work as an Air Traffic Controller, it’s a highly competitive field. Air Traffic Controllers coordinate the movement of aircraft in the air and at airports to prevent accidents and minimize delays, using radar and visual observation. Applicants must pass rigorous physical examinations, background checks, drug screening, and some may also be required to take aptitude tests. Stress levels are high, but so is the pay.

5. Elevator Mechanic: $61, 500

 It doesn’t require a degree, but you do need to obtain a license. Successful elevator mechanics generally understand complex mechanical systems and follow safety standards. Elevator mechanics may also need to work odd hours, for example, to fix a broken elevator before the morning rush at an office building.

6. Private Detective or Investigator: $50,600

Critical-thinking, an understanding of the law and psychology are useful for anyone wanting to become a private detective. While watching endless episodes of “Law & Order” might not be enough preparation, social situations where you listen and read body language do give you good experience. Other responsibilities may include analyzing data, researching databases, questioning suspects or taking the stand at a hearing.

7. Freelance Photographer: $47,800

As any freelancer knows, being successfully self-employed requires discipline and a critical understanding of business practices. It also helps to be a skilled photographer, so don’t go thinking just anyone can start their own photography company. I also know a variety of people who make a living with freelance video production. Think about all the possibilities you can start out with– weddings, bat and bar mitzvahs, music videos, live performances — you name it.

8. Fishing Supervisor: $43,720

Atlantic Canada: Fishing boats, canaries, factory trawlers, floating processors — these may be a dangerous jobs, but you can walk away with a boat load of money, and you likely only have to work one season on the year. To become a supervisor, you’re likely to work as an assistant or crew member first, before being promoted.

9. Personal Trainer: $37,500

Many personal trainers have degrees or specialized certification in the field, although not necessarily a four year degree. It is, however, important to have an understanding of anatomy, nutrition, and first aid for safety reasons and to keep your clients well-informed. Similar to any entrepreneur, time-management and customer service skills are useful in this field. Physical stamina and a healthy lifestyle are also highly recommended.

10. Bus Driver: $35, 990

Inner-city bus drivers or train operators make a good amount of dough, and they are just required to get a license to do it. School bus drivers, on average, make a little less, but cash in at an annual mean of $28,050. Bus drivers have an important job, as they are responsible for safely transporting passenger to and from their destination. That means, to be a bus driver, you have to be alert at all times and have a keen eye for traffic and weather conditions.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

International Professionals in Canada: find a temporary job

Do you want to work on a temporary basis in Canada? There are many temporary positions available in various sectors. Companies usually hire out specific small-term projects as temporary positions.  Agency-placed temporary jobs are a growing haven for laid-off professionals and those in skilled trades. 

And with companies cutting millions of full-time jobs this year, staffing industry experts say they’re fielding more and more applications from local and national and international  seasoned workers . Researching companies  is a great way to find temporary jobs in Canada. Here’s tips for finding and keeping the bests Canadian temporary jobs.

1. Target the right firms . Start with a detailed list of companies in the field you are interested and province, check   Canada Employer’s database for Int’l Prfessionals. 

2.  Register with multiple staffing  agencies. Start with a detailed list of companies and staffing firms in your area, check the Canadian Staffing Association’s directory.  It’s not taboo to be working with several placement firms. “It’s understood that (it) happens. Like applying for any job, you circulate your credentials and hope for an assignment.   Many services operate Web sites with helpful career information and links to other resources in addition to online application materials and job postings. Here’s a couple of national and international staffing companies and their main specialties:

Accountemps
Locations: 360 worldwide
Specialties: financial, accounting, credit and collections
Web site:
www.accountemps.com

Aerotek
Locations: 150 worldwide
Specialties: engineering, aviation, scientific and architecture
Web site:
www.aerotek.com

Kelly Services
Locations: 2,000 nationwide
Specialties: professional services, law, health care, technical and administrative
Web site:
www.kellyservices.com

Manpower
Locations: 4,200 worldwide
Specialties: professional services, technical, finance, engineering and administrative
Web site:
www.manpower.com 

 3. Tweak your resume:  Write an Accomplishments-Based Resume. employers  want to know of specific skill sets, the details on projects you’ve manage with success.

4. Be clear and firm about your salary expectations.

5. Ever been told you’re underqualified? Or overqualified? here is the best approach:

Underqualified: in a persuavie way say: “I’m very interested in working for you and your company, and I’ll keep my eye on the website. Remember candidates should indicate that they will address whatever shortcomings they’re told about, she says. They have two choices: either come up with specifics that show the gap actually isn’t there, or propose a plan that would fill any gaps.

The overqualified should avoid telling the interviewer how the company should be run or let an overinflated self-image show. “I want to hear they’re very collaborative and not independent, and that it’s a team approach.” It’s important to “show your passion is for the work, not for being a director or leader.” Candidates should avoid arguin or  explanations like: “I just need a job for now”. Interviewers are looking for people willing to grow with the company, and such answers don’t show a long-term interest in the company or the position.

Overqualified: The best tactic: Agree that “you may be right” but add on “for this job.” The idea is for the candidate to position himself or herself as someone the organization can look to as it grows and needs more experienced people. “What you’re doing is trying to position yourself not just a s a solution for today but for tomorrow.  There’s also absolutely nothing wrong, he adds, with saying you’d be content to take a position that’s seen as below your qualifications. “The world needs movers and shakers but it also needs doers.” If true, a candidate may state clearly that he or she is not interested in moving up in an organization but “they’d be happy to mentor more junior people.”

 6. Once you’re on the job, don’t coast. Temporary jobs are more than a paycheck. They’re a foot in the door to a prospective full-time employer, a networking opportunity and a chance to learn new skills in a new business sector.
7. Take advantage of training. While agency clients expect a basic skill set from their temps, such as meeting work schedules and deadlines and taking instructions from supervisors, most offer some sort of training. You might get a chance to learn a new database, the latest accounting software or how to operate state-of-the-art machinery.

8. Take advantage of temp packages: (medical benefits, paid vacation, RSSP, savings plans, workers’ compensation coverage and other benefits.

9.  Identify and research the companies in your chosen sector.   Once you have decided which industry niche can offer you the career path you are looking for, spend time  researching specific  companies. If possible, find ways to meet and get an interview with individuals (human resource, hiring managers, etc )  from these companies. Interviews always seem to take the format of the employer asking the majority of the questions: this does not have to be the case. I recommend you to prepare at least ten questions before a meeting, and make sure that they are very relevant to the vacancy and your future. Some of your key questions should focus on the internal processes for progression; for example:
■What methods do you use to encourage internal promotions?
■What percentage of staff members have been promoted in the last 12 months?
■Do you have a career development programme in place?
■How does it work?
■How often do appraisals take place?
■How is the information used?
■What is the annual training budget per person

10. Never make a career choice based on money. I know this may sound crazy but choosing your first job or changing your job for money usually only offers short-term benefit.

11. Always try to achieve a sensible work-life balance:  I’d be inclined to look for a new position in a company that recognises the considerable benefits of a healthy balance between work and your life away from work.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

Como conseguir trabajo en Canada?

¿Estas harto de trabajar todos los dias pero no recibir el salario que mereces? ¿No has podido obtener el estatus social que deseas?, ¿pese a que llevas años en el país tu situación social y laboral sigue siendo inestable?

Si estas indocumentado en USA por seguro  pasado varias ocasiones pensando en el regresar a tu país natal, dado que la situación económica ha hecho más difícil el conseguir trabajo, sin embargo también recuerdas que allá encontrar las mismas oportunidades que has tenido es  imposible. Así mismo ves lejana cualquier oportunidad de amnistia y una de las pocas luces encendidas que tenias con las refromas migratorias se borró cuando el departamento de migración de Estados Unidos se transformó en “Homeland Security” y tu caso fue puesto una vez mas en “Espera”.

Tu contribución al país ha sido cuestionada, el gobierno americano no ha puesto en marcha propuestas reales para que tu situación cambie y la gran mayoria de gobiernos en latinomerica  no tiene ni la capacidad de negociación para cambiar esta realidad, ni la infraestructura para poder recibirte de vuelta.

El hecho de no poder aplicar a mejores empleos por la falta de papeles, el no tener mejores condiciones crediticias, asi como la melancolía que da el no poder visitar a la familia cuando las cosas no salen tan bien en tierra ajena son momentos duros que solamente el que ha caminado por la vereda del sueño americano sin papeles conoce. No es una buena idea inmigrar ilegal ni son documentos y peor sin preparacion profesional.

Con toda esta situación me parece que el buscar otras opciones en otros lugares extranjeros para poder legalizarte es lo más prudente, una vez que ya te has acostumbrado a un estilo de vida, lengua extranjera (que pese a que no hables el inglés a la perfección ya no te es una lengua totalmente desconocida) , entonces piensas en Canadá.  Canadá viene a la mente como una opción natural, por lo tanto y dada la falta de información en espanol he creado una serie de articulos y recursos para que conozcas a mas profundidad el proceso migratorio canadiense, estos de estos articulos contienen:

*¿Que estatus legales existen en Canadá?

*¿Cuales son las características específicas de cada uno de ellos?

*¿Qué es un permiso de trabajo?

*¿Para que lo necesito?

*¿Que beneficios me trae mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Puedo volverme residente permanente de Canadá? ¿Cuando sucede esto?

*¿Como es la economia canadiense?

*Si obtengo un permiso de trabajo ¿puede mi familia estar conmigo?

*Diagrama completo del proceso a seguir (No se encuentra este digrama en ningún otro lugar)

*Una vez entendido el diagrama ¿Qué es lo que tengo que hacer en cada etapa? ¿Qué pasa en cada etapa?

*¿Qué es un LMO?

*¿Lo que se hacer lo puedo hacer en Canadá?

*¿Qué importancia tiene mi experiencia profesional en mi proceso migratorio?
*¿Qué importancia tiene la comprobacion de mi experiencia?

*¿Que requiero para ser aceptado en Canadá? ¿para que se me otorgue un permiso de trabajo?

*¿Cual es la razon mas importante para que sea expedido un permiso de trabajo?

*El secreto por el cual el 99% de las personas que intentan aplicar a un permiso de trabajo fallan y lo que debes de hacer para evitarlo (lo que he llamado como el perfil migratorio.)

*¿Qué evaluación personal debo de hacer antes de aplicar a mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Como romper el ciclo ilegal? (no me dan ofertas de trabajo por ser ilegal y soy ilegal por falta de ofertas de trabajo)

*¿Quien puede ayudarte a romper ese ciclo?

*¿Como voy a aplicar a mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Lo que yo hago/trabajo en Estados Unidos lo podria aplicar en Canadá?

*¿Lo que trabajo  necesita permiso de trabajo en Canadá?

*¿Donde puedo buscar las ocupaciones que otorgan permiso de trabajo?

*¿Qué provincia es la mejor para que yo aplique?

*¿Cual es la diferencia entre un contrato y un patrocinio?

*¿Como puedo justificar que quiero trabajar en Canada?

*¿Que otros programas migratorios existen en Canada?

*¿Qué departamentos provinciales y federales son los encargados de expedir los documentos para ontener un permiso de trabajo?

*Si una empresa quiere contratarme, pero no tengo permiso de trabajo en el país ¿Que pasos debe de seguir para que obtenga un permiso de trabajo?

*¿Todas las provincias canadienses tienen las mismas oportunidades?

*¿Todas las provincias tienen las mismas regulaciones?

*¿Puedo aplicar en cualquier provincia?

*¿Cuantas veces puedo aplicar para un LMO?

*¿Qué pasa si tengo experiencia en varias areas profesionales?

*¿Qué experiencia profesional es la que más me conviene presentar?

*¿Cuanto tarda este proceso?

*¿Qué pasa si mi LMO es negativa?

*¿Con un LMO positivo puedo ya trabajar en Canadá?

*¿Quien emite mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Donde me entregan mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Puedo recoger mi permiso de trabajo al llegar a Canada?

*¿Mi permiso de trabajo me lo envian a mi pais de origen?

*¿Una vez que tengo una cita con el consulado o embajada esto ya asegura mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Como es un permiso de trabajo?, ¿como se que no me están mandando uno falso?

*¿Qué datos incluye?

*¿Qué limitaciones puede tener mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Qué es una visa de entrada?

*¿Quien necesita una visa de entrada al país?

*¿Quien otorga la visa de entrada al país?

*¿Se me puede negar una visa de entrada al país, pese a que tenga un LMO positivo?

*¿Que pasa si me es negada?

Como te puedes dar cuenta existe una gran cantidad de información que no está disponible abiertamente al público y que la mayor parte de los abogados en migración cobran grandes sumas cantidades de dinero aprovechándose en la falta de información que la mayor parte del público tiene, por lo que es importante de que antes de que comiences tu proceso migratorio tengas la mayor información posible para poder elegir claramente si requieres un abogado en migración o no y cual será tu mejor opción.

Una de las situaciones más difíciles en tu proceso migratorio es el poder darle seguimiento al mismo a larga distancia y el primer paso para lograr esto es entender cada uno de los pasos que compone el mismo para que puedas saber que es lo que sigue, que falta, que entregar, cuando hacerlo y de esa manera tengas un mejor control de la situación.

Asi mismo lo que contiene cada una de las formas y entregables debes de conocerlo para que tu proceso tenga la mayor probabilidad de éxito, es por eso que también se incluyen análisis minuciosos a cada uno de los documentos involucrados en el proceso tales como:

*¿Mi LMO contiene algún número para que pueda darle seguimiento?

*¿Quien brinda este numero?

*¿Donde fue mi caso procesado? (¿fue donde mi abogado me indicó?)

*¿La fecha que mi abogado me dijo que sería procesado es real? ¿donde puedo comprobar esa fecha?

*¿Los documentos que me están mostrando en verdad son los miós? ¿como lo puedo comprobar?

*¿Como se que la respuesta a mis documentos fue positiva o negativa?

*¿En que se basa la desición que el gobierno brinda?

*¿Qué documento es el que me va a permitir entrar a Canadá?

*¿Mi LMO es suficiente para trabajar en Canadá?

*¿Puedo llegar con mi LMO puedo entrar a Canadá?

*¿Hay alguna página web a la que pueda ir para más información?

*¿Existe algún teléfono para comunicarme?

*¿Los documentos que me envía el gobierno tiene alguna fecha de expiración?

*¿Como se quien va a ser mi empleador?

*¿Bajo que categoría del NOC fui aceptado?

*¿Qué nivel de estudios y lenguaje necesito para desempeñarme en la categoría en la que fui elegido?

*¿Existen posibilidades de conseguir un permiso de trabajo si no hablo inglés?

*¿Por cuanto tiempo es mi permiso de trabajo?

*¿Cuanto es lo que voy a ganar?

*Cuando hablé con mi abogado o empleador me comentaron varios beneficios adicionales ¿Como se a cuales voy a tener derecho?

*¿Cuantas horas de trabajo se comprometen a darme?

*¿En donde voy a llevar acabo mi trabajo?

Y mucha mas información!!!!!!

Es importante que te subscribas  inmediatamente a este portal para recibir la respuesta a las preguntas más frecuentes.

P.S.

Subscribete al servicio de informacion de Hineni  y recibe de manera inmediata listas de las empresas que están contratando trabajadores extranjeros.La  base de datos mas completa de firmas ofreciendo trabajo a profesionales entrenados en el extranjero.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a business facilitator. She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case

Canada: Sample arrange employment offer letters

A job offer letter is the minimum promise protection you should have in any work opportunity requiring you to resign your current job or to relocate out of your place of residence. A job offer letter is a condensed pre-employment contract outlining the basics of your employment. In small companies a job offer letter may be written without a lawyer’s help.

A written agreement also benefits an employer because you as an employee agree to provide specific work benefits and make certain promises (like not revealing company secrets or stealing company customers). Employment relationships are increasingly contract-oriented for professional, managerial, technical, and administrative positions.

Arranged Employment is possible when a Canadian employer extends an offer of full-time permanent employment in Canada* to a foreign skilled worker.  The foreign skilled worker’s Canadian Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa will be expedited so that the worker can come to Canada and start working for the Canadian employer quickly.

Arranged Employment is one of ways to qualify for a Canada Permanent Resident Visa through the Federal Skilled Worker category of immigration.

If an Employer is being paid money to offer employment, it is obviously not a genuine offer. Anyone participating in such a scheme is involved in a fraudulent practice.

Moreover, HRDC is now starting to question employers closely about the relationship between the employer and the employee and the motivation for offering the job on an indeterminate basis. Similarly, at the visa interview, the visa officer will closely question the applicant in similar terms. The applicant must also satisfy the officer that he or she is capable of performing the job and likely to accept the job upon arrival in Canada.

I always advise  foreign  job-seekers to get job offers in writing if employers don’t offer any form of contract. If an employer seems unwilling, one way around the issue is to write an acceptance letter of the job offer in which you spell out what you understand to be the conditions of employment.

For a position such as sales or marketing  where there are various salary issues, including commission levels, it is extremely important to get the specifics in writing.

Click here for a sample

Coming to Canada as Business Immigrant

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Canada immigration: Business people

Business visitor is a separate category with separate requirements. Business visitors do not require a work permit. They may still need a temporary resident visa.  Business visitors do not need a work permit. They may still need a temporary resident visa.  A business visitor is someone who comes to Canada to engage in international business activities without directly entering the Canadian labour market.

Business visitors must prove the following:
their main source of payment is outside Canada and
their main place of business is outside Canada
Business people include certain people entering Canada under the following free trade agreements:
North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
Business people covered by NAFTA do not need a labour market opinion from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC).
This means that Canadian employers do not need to have a job offer approved by HRSDC to employ a United States or a Mexican business person, as set out in NAFTA.
Business people covered by NAFTA must, however, comply with the general provisions on temporary entry to Canada.
NAFTA applies to four specific categories of business people: business visitors, professionals, intra-company transferees, and traders and investors.

A professional must:
be qualified to work in one of the more than 60 professions listed in Appendix 1603.D.1 of Chapter 16 of NAFTA (for example, accountant, computer systems analyst, engineer, management consultant and technical publications writer) and have pre-arranged employment with a Canadian enterprise in an occupation that matches the qualification.
An intra-company transferee must:
have worked continuously for at least one year in the preceding three years for the same or affiliated employer in the United States or Mexico
be transferred to Canada to work temporarily for the same or an affiliated employer and
work in a capacity that is managerial, executive or that involves specialized knowledge.

A trader or an investor must:
be seeking to carry out substantial trade in goods or services, mainly between Canada and her or his country of citizenship, or conduct substantial investment activities in Canada, in a supervisory or an executive capacity, or in a capacity that involves essential skills
meet additional requirements under NAFTA and
have a work permit.
Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA)
The CCFTA is modelled on NAFTA and makes it easier for Canadian and Chilean citizens to temporarily enter each of the two countries.
The rules and requirements are similar to those under NAFTA and cover the four categories of business people: business visitors, professionals, intra-company transferees, and traders and investors.
General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS)
Under GATS, Canada has committed to making it easier for certain business people who are foreign service providers in certain sectors to access the Canadian market. The commitments apply to service providers from more than 140 World Trade Organization member countries.
 

Three categories of business people are covered: business visitors, professionals and intra-company transferees.

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Immigration Canada: Bilingual Canada: French

Canada is officially a bilingual country but, with nearly 60% of the population speaking English as their mother-tongue, and only 24% speaking French as their first language. Canada is mostly a bilingual nation on “paper only” but curiously French is not the only linguistic minority in Canada

There are two varieties of French in Canada: Acadian and French-Canadian (or Québécois French), and they differ in terms of accent and local lexis.  Acadians are descendents of 17th century settlers in the province of Nova Scotia, and French-Canadians are generally known as descendents of French settlers in the province of Québec in the same century. 

The French language spoken in Canada (both Québécois and Acadian varieties) is substantially different from Standard French from France.  This is because of a long history of French in Canada, with the original settlers coming from parts of France other than Paris, who continued to use the French from the Ancien Régime, while the Standard French in France used today evolved instead from 18th century bourgeois Parisian French.   The pronunciation and vocabulary of French in Canada is quite different from International French, and a French person or a Belgian might find it difficult to understand a Québecer, like a Texan might find it hard to understand a Welsh-speaker, for example. 

Canadian French also contains a large number of Anglicisms, which is to be expected, since Canada is a bilingual country, and Québec borders the United States (although while French people say ‘weekend’ and ‘parking’, French-Canadians say ‘fin de semaine’ and ‘stationnement’).  Some popular anglicisms in Québec are: anyway (anyway); chum (male friend, boyfriend); checker (to check); cute (cute).

Canada is often described as a multicultural nation. But what does that mean? Simply stated, it means that Canadians are not of any one cultural background, race or heritage. Instead, Canadians today reflect a vast diversity of cultural heritages and racial groups. This multicultural diversity is a result of centuries of immigration.

The greater the diversity of the racial and cultural mix, the greater the need for tolerance and openness in accepting one another as fellow Canadians. With globalization and the ever-increasing movement of people from one country to another, the challenge of appreciating and accommodating cultural differences has become a universal experience. A multicultural policy that is sensitive to the needs of both long-time residents and the newly arrived will probably meet with the greatest success. Canada’s future depends on the commitments of all its citizens to a unified Canadian identity, while still taking pride in the uniqueness of their individual heritage

It’s very important and helpful if an inmmigrant coming to Canada speaks, write and reads well the French Language.

 Of the 251,511 immigrants officially welcomed to Canada a couple of years ago, approximately 17.8 percent of them arrived directly in Quebec. Most immigrants to Canada come to Ontario, but since the language most commonly used in Quebec is French, that province attracts a lot of immigration from Africa (that includes not only the countries south of the Sahara but also the countries on the Mediterranean) where French is still widely spoken.

But do all immigrants arriving in Quebec speak French? Far from it – 58 percent of the people who decided to land in Quebec in 2006 spoke French or had the basics. The rest did not speak a word. It is no wonder that the Quebec government is dedicating a lot of attention and money to teaching French to the remaining 42 percent.

For obvious reasons, wherever you are, knowing the language is a big help in settling down and absorbing the culture of the country to which you have decided to immigrate. It will help you get a job, find a place to live and make friends. You may be able to survive in Montreal speaking only English, but once you start wandering in the rest of the province, you had better make sure you are good at sign language!

So, what can you do in Quebec to learn French? Well, the government is really helping out. There are several programs in place, or soon to be, to ease you into learning the other official language of Canada (yes, there are 2 official languages here).

The government of Quebec has a program in place, in participation with local universities, settlement agencies and school boards. Before you do anything, you should check out the website of the immigration ministry from the government of Quebec. If your French is not good enough yet, you can still browse through the information in either English or Spanish; just click on the link and it will bring you to the proper page. All the information is centralized there and it will help you decide if you can commit to a 30 hours/week schedule for several weeks, depending on your progress rate and initial knowledge of the language. There are of course different levels of courses, so no matter what your skills are, whether you need to learn the language from a beginner’s level, refresh your school memories or simply make sure that your French is up-to-date and on the same level as the current business environment, you will find something that suits you.

There is also the possibility of doing it part time. In 2006-2007, a total of 9,748 immigrants participated in full time French courses (all levels included) and 10,398 in part time ones. Most of those persons were women, taking advantage of the financial support for day care (see next page). A large majority of the courses were also given in Montreal (approximately 71 percent), but this is not surprising since most of the immigration in Quebec is absorbed by Montreal, much like Toronto in Ontario.

There are, of course, the regular local settlement agencies, or “Carrefours d’intégration” (roughly translated, Integration squares). The services there may vary. 

These Integration squares will likely forward you to the ministry of immigration since the main activity of these organizations throughout the province is to help you find a place to live and of course a job, plus helping with all the administrative formalities that you have to cope with when you arrive in a new country. The other reason why they will do so is because the courses offered are very well-designed and accessible to most of the immigrants. Of course, if you are looking for a very specific kind of course, they will be able to forward you to the proper education facility or company.

There is also an internet based databank of a wide range of exercises (over a thousand), from pronunciation to vocabulary, grammar to educational games. You can access this databank from the immigration Quebec website. This databank was consulted in 2006-2007 more than 232,000 times for the French pages, and more that 17,000 times for the English or Spanish pages.

There is also an online service that should be available in January for those of you who want to learn on their own. The government of Quebec struck a deal with Bell Canada to set up the service which will enable those who already have the basics to improve on them and learn more about the province and the social codes.

The other nice thing about the involvement of the government of Quebec is that they are financially supporting those who apply for French lessons. The assistance is not enough to live off of, but it could help if you have to leave your child in day care for example. However, some conditions apply, so make sure you verify everything before starting. The conditions are standard in every province for this kind of benefits. For example, one of them is that you need to have a landed immigrant status. Follow this link to find all the info you need.

Learning French will open doors both personally and professionally – and not just in Quebec – so it’s something worth doing no matter where in Canada you live either as regular inmigrant or a busisness person.

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a regular job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

How to get a job in Canada

1. Create a professional Resume using an unique Resume Builder, online portafolio, store Contacts, make Notes, send Faxes or lastly create your job alerts when registering in canadian employment websites such as workopolis.

2. To get a well paying job, or reasonably well paying, you’re going to need very good spoken English or French with as little accent as possible. Many new immigrants have levels of English or French that is so poor, I couldn’t understand what they were speaking and they hold an MBA from a Canadian University. Many immigrants think that they speak very good English or French which they may be right when comparing the standard of English or French in their home country, but in Canada, their level of spoken English or French  is just very poor. Most companies will not employ people with such a low level of spoken English or French. It simply reflects very badly on the company.

3. It really is very difficult to employ an immigrant based on his/her overseas qualification. No one knows whether your degrees and training is genuine and it is very difficult for the employers to confirm both your training and qualifications. Who knows? This sounds very harsh but that’s the truth of the matter. When you come to Canada you have to start from scratch, if you don’t like it then you have to start your own business. The level of competency from overseas qualifications varies considerably. Some may be very good while some others simply cannot be counted upon.

4. Network. The best companies to work for tend to rely heavily (up to 40%) on employee referrals.[1] Make a list of all of your friends, relatives, and acquaintances.

Touch base with all of your references. The purpose of this is twofold. You can ask them for leads, and you’ll also be refreshing their memory of you in their mind. Use Linkedin and Facebook.

5. Volunteer. Living in Canada and without employment? Volunteering might me a great ‘canadian experience referral” so if you aren’t already, start volunteering for an organization that focuses on something that you’re passionate about. You may end up doing boring or easy work in the beginning, but as you stick around and demonstrate your commitment, you’ll be given more responsibilities

6. Apply for jobs that don’t have a  diploma as a requirement:

1. Careers in Health Care Abound
2. Careers in Public Safety are Growing
3. Careers in Information Technology are Always Around

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

6 Things you need to know before arriving to Canada

1. Bring or have a credit card. They are are the major means of payment in Canada.

Having a credit history is important if you want to get a credit card, a mortgage, oreven to rent an apartment, rent a car. Consumers who have not had an opportunity to establish acredit history, such as recent immigrants and students, may find themselves at adisadvantage when applying for credit products.

Canadian financial services are credit-oriented. However, financial institutions in Canada generally do notrecognize international credit history, making it hard for recent immigrants, even those with years of stablebanking practices in their own country, to access personal and/or business financing. Lack of a Canadian  credit history is a genuine problem for immigrants trying to settle in Canada, especially entrepreneurs  looking to start a business, as it is a barrier to accessing financing, often preventing newcomers fromintegrating and settling into Canadian society.

2. Credit history is the first thing you need to build in Canada

Credit history or credit report is, in many countries, a record of an individual’s or company’s past borrowing and repaying, including information about late payments and bankruptcy. The term “credit reputation” can either be used synonymous to credit history or to credit score.

In Canadea when a customer fills out an application for credit from a bank, store or credit card company, their information is forwarded to a credit bureau. The credit bureau matches the name, address and other identifying information on the credit applicant with information retained by the bureau in its files.That’s why it’s very important for creditors, lenders and others to provide accurate data to credit bureaus.

This information is used by lenders such as credit card companies to determine an individual’s credit worthiness; that is, determining an individual’s willingness to repay a debt. The willingness to repay a debt is indicated by how timely past payments have been made to other lenders. Lenders like to see consumer debt obligations paid on a monthly basis.

Credit history usually applies to only one country. Even within the same credit card network, information is not shared between different countries. For example, if a person has been living in the USA  for many years and then moves to Canada, when they apply for credit cards or a mortgage in Canada, they would usually not be approved because of a lack of credit history, even if they had an excellent credit rating in their home country and even if they had a very high salary in their home country. An immigrant must establish a credit history from scratch in the new country.  Because if not  is usually very difficult for immigrants to obtain credit cards and mortgages until after they have worked in the new country with a stable income for several years.

Some credit card companies (f.e. American Express) can transfer credit cards from one county to another and this way help starting a credit history, check if your credit company can do before you move to Canada.

3. A car is a necessity:

Enviromentally speaking, I support public transportation with all my heart and had supported with my wallet ( I own an adult trike and use TTC), but life in Canada is more suit to the 4 wheels. Driving less and eliminating “unnecessary” car trips has been one of the leading ways people say they save money.  Driving ourselves to work instead of commuting can be the measurement of promotion or getting fired from work, particularly if the everyday route one takes is prone to traffic jams. Driving is also a lot comfortable than sitting in a bus or standing up in a subway train elbow to elbow with other people.

A car’s comfort, however, varies from place to place. If you live in a region where there is minor or no traffic at all, then you have a painless travel life. You also have an easier alternative to take either your car or public transpo without having to worry which is the fastest. You also don’t have to worry consuming more gas because of traffic and pay for the next time you you fill ‘er up

4.  The cost of insurance is significant:

In Canada, unlike other countries insurance in many cases is highly recommended if not mandatory.  If you own a car, a house or just rent an apartment, it is important to have insurance. It is also important to have health and life insurance. If you own or want to buy and drive car, you are required by law to have at the very minimum, liability insurance.  If you want to take out a loan to buy a car or house, the bank or Mortgage Company will require that you purchase insurance to cover the amount you are borrowing for your car to pay for physical damage to your car, or for the value of the house you are purchasing.  Some landlords require you to have renter’s insurance when you sign a lease.  Life and Health insurance is invaluable, especially when you are in an accident or have a major health issue, and you should have at the very least a life insurance policy to cover the cost of a funeral.  Insurance companies occupy    the best buildings in downtown district.

5.  The Canadian job market is hidden . Canada is experiencing a skills shortage in several industries, and employers may view British nationals with the appropriate skills and experience as a valuable resource. However, the graduate labour market is very competitive, and the current recession is contributing to a challenging climate for both Canadian and foreign jobseekers. Try to build a Canadian employment history , to monitor the Canadian job market  and don’t get stuck in dead end jobs or survival jobs.

Where can you find  work?

•Major industries: trade, finance, insurance, real estate and leasing, professional, scientific and technical services, education, health and social care, accommodation and food services.
•Recent growth areas: service industries and information technology.
•Industries in decline: primary sector, manufacturing and utilities.
•Shortage occupations: health sector (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, medical technologists and technicians, nurse aides), management occupations, trade (especially home builders and renovators), occupations related to the oil and gas sector, IT, occupations in social science and government service (including university teachers).
•Major companies: Royal Bank of Canada, Manulife Financial, Bank of Nova Scotia, Toronto-Dominion Bank, EnCana, Sun Life Financial Services, Bank of Montreal, Canadian Imperial Bank, BCE, Imperial Oil.
•Search for more companies: Kompas, Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Yellow Pages Canada.
•Major cities: Ottawa (capital), Toronto (largest), Montreal, Vancouver.

6.  Network, network and network

Join idustries and association , volunteer, ask for information interview, or take bridging programs through your local community college or settlement agency and of course use social media like linkedin and facebook. the canadian welcomes hight skilled  and skilled worker but canadian companies required canadian employment history. before arriving, try to monitor the canadian job market.

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Coming to Canada as a Business Immigrant

If you already run a business  the Business Immigration Program seeks to attract experienced business people to Canada who will support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy…. but  the old adage goes: failure to plan is a plan for failure.  Whether you are building a business from scratch or buying a business, you should not skip this important step … even if it means that you just jot your ideas down on scraps of paper or a napkin!

Business immigrants are expected to make a C$400,000 investment or to own and manage businesses in Canada.
Canada has three classes of business immigrants:

•investors
•entrepreneurs and
•self-employed persons.

Each application can be made for only one class and cannot be changed once the application is submitted. The criteria you must meet to qualify are different for each class.

Business Immigrant. Entrepreneuer Subclass.  Developing your business project

When applying for immigration to Canada, entrepreneur applicants must submit a business project that will be the key factor in the assessment of their application. Remember you will summiting this project as part of your  permanent worker or businesspeople immigration paperwork.

This project is the first step towards implementing the business plan itself. Experience shows that the rigour demanded when developing your business plan will help you identify all the challenges facing your project.

In general, the business plan contains all the information about your target clientele, competitors and suppliers. It includes a market study, a marketing strategy and budget forecasts.

Need help developing your business plan? Check below our  useful links

Going into business or acquiring a business

Once in Canada, you will have to undertake a number of steps to start up your business or acquire a business. This will be much easier if you made contacts during for instance a first exploratory trip. Otherwise, don’t hesitate to contact the various resource persons who provide you with the support needed to start your business. They can guide you in your first steps and save you a great deal of time.

3 steps to take as soon as you arrive

The many different steps you’ll take will depend on the type of business you want to establish. You’ll have to contact competent persons to make your start-up easier. To guide you, here are three steps you should take as soon as you arrive:

  • Obtaining support for your start-up.
  • Completing the formalities for starting up a business.
  • Seeking out business opportunities.

SELF EMPLOYMENT SUBCLASS.  Create your own job

If you have some capital, perhaps you are planning to create your own job, start your own company or become a partner in an existing company.

To be successful, this generally requires a good understanding of the Candian business milieu and a business plan based on an extensive market study. If this option interests you, there are many resources available to help you achieve your goals.

Find out if the profession or trade you plan to practice as a self-employed worker is governed by a regulatory body. If so, you must fulfill the organization’s requirements.

There is a network of public services across all of Canada ’s regions for individuals seeking self-employment or who want to be entrepreneurs in Canada. Visit the useful links recommended here.

 INVESTOR IMMIGRANTS. SUBSCLASS

Investors currently have to demonstrate that they have at least three years of management experience acquired in the 10 years preceding their application in a farming, commercial or industrial business that is profitable and legal, or for a government or one of its departments or agencies or for an international agency.

Management experience is defined as the actual assuming on a full-time basis of responsibilities and duties related to the planning, management and control of financial resources and of human or material resources. 

Under the amendments : (including Quebec)

•Investors will need to have at least two years of management experience acquired in the five years preceding their application. This experience no longer has to be acquired in a profitable business, which will simplify application processing procedures.
•The level of management experience required will be more flexible in order to broaden the pool of managers eligible for the program.•Management experience will no longer have to have been acquired on a full-time basis and experience acquired in a professional business will be eligible to enable the selection of applicants who practise both management functions and a professional activity. In this case, the professional business should have at least the equivalent of two full-time staff (30 or more hours per week), excluding the candidate. Calculation of net assets
Investor immigrants are required to have net assets of $800,000. Under the present Regulation, these assets must have been accumulated through legal economic activities and may include the value of the equity of the accompanying spouse, if that equity belongs to the foreign national and is invested in an enterprise in which the investor also controls the equity and has acquired experience in management.

Under the amendments :

•Net assets may include donations and inheritances held by the applicant as well as all the assets of his or her spouse, which would broaden the pool of applicants eligible for the program. However, donations received less than six months prior to the filing of the application will not be accepted.
Selection based on applicant’s record
Currently, all investors are required to attend a selection interview. 

Under the amendments :

•Selection may be based on the applicant’s record, which would allow for more flexibility in administering the program.
 

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Recession Proof Jobs and Careers in Canada

Hundreds of jobs are disappearing daily in many countries. In some industries people manage to keep their jobs during recessions and financial crises. What are the recession-proof jobs in Canada?

To keep a job during an economic recession, it helps to have a recession-proof career. Are there any industries, where jobs will be stable throughout the current global financial crisis?  Here I post a basic  list of  best recession proof  jobs, careerss and industries.

Recession Proof Jobs

Sales & Marketing representatives top the list–and, unlike other professions, not because there’s a shortage. Rather, in tough economic times, a good sales force is a critical way to pull a company out of a downturn.

Network administrators: they are responsible for the design and management of the physical and technical structure of company’s communication tools–such as shared files, e-mail, teleconferencing and company Web sites. Demand is particularly high in emerging markets like India, China and the Middle East, which are these creating networks for the first time.

IT and computer Jobs.  Jobs in this field would continue to be in demand even during financial crisis. The IT services still need to function efficiently with or without a recession.

Food related-jobs. People regardless of their status in life need to eat. Cheaper restaurants and take out counters obviously would need to staff up more employees to meet the demand.

Healthcare/ Medical-Related Jobs. During recession, the need for skilled nurses, doctors, caregivers, medical assistants, doctors, psychologists, psychoanalysts, home health aides, dentists, health service administrators/managers, would most likely be more in demand.
Recession Proof Careers

Medical-Related Careers.   Medical professionals are always in demand. For example, nurses, physical therapists, dentists, physicians, health services administrators/managers and other medical professionals such as pharmacists are always needed because there are always individuals who become ill and need medical care. Medical professionals typically work in schools, medical offices, community healthcare centers, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, and hospitals.

Education Careers

Education is another stable career area due to the fact that there will always be children, adolescents, and adults who need to attend school. On the college level and graduate school level, there is a need for professors and administrators because there are always students attending college in order to get a college education.In addition, there is a need for individuals such as Private Tutors and Enrichment Program Instructors or Facilitators for specialized areas including languages.

Computer Careers
Computer science can be a good career area to pursue. Whether the career interest is in being a computer systems analyst, network systems and data communication analyst, software design, web master, web developer, Web Programmer, Information architecture or a network and computer systems administrator, if one is flexible geographically, that helps because businesses always have a need for competent computeror system analyst workers

Accounting Careers and Finantial Careers

Bookkeepig and Accounting can be a stable profession in times of recession due to the fact that even if the economic conditions worsen, people still have to pay taxes. As part of the process of paying taxes, people often need tax advice and tax preparation help. Accountants specialize in giving tax advice and tax preparation help. Thus, accountants work no matter what the economic circumstances are for individuals, corporate, for profit and for the non profit sector.
Recession Proof Industries
Security – No matter how bad the financial crisis gets, the need for security shall not decrease. Jobs like firemen, police, law enforcement officers, customs and security services, forensics, and shop security personnel may even need more skilled personnel during the recession.

Healthcare – As mention above the need for skilled nurses, doctors, psychologists and psychotherapists, analysts, caregivers, medical assistants, physical therapists, home health aides, medical records staff and health information technicians will hardly decrease and may even grow during the recession.

Education – The need for trained teachers and some other skilled people instructors or facilitators is the core processes of the education industry. In highly populated growth areas remain this constant during recessions and will probably remain so now.

Personal Care – Barbers, hairdressers, beauticians and cosmetologists also could keep their jobs. Businesses in the upmarket range might lose customers but those who cater to downmarket needs will probably survive.

Legal Professions – Skilled professionals in the claims and compensation sectors, or those dealing with bankruptcies, and contractual disputes usually see more work during recessions.

Food Industry – People can’t give up eating even during a recession. Cheaper take-aways and eateries would need more staff ready to work at lower pay to function than luxury restaurants, which may not have enough customers.

House and Car Repairs – Skilled house repair servicemen like plumbers or electricians in densely populated areas didn’t lose their jobs during previous recessions. Though not many new houses are being built, emergency repairs are vital. We might drive older cars, but they need to be serviced and repaired. Cleaners will still be needed so executive or average housekeepers will much needed.

Environmental Sector – The demand for skilled professionals in environmental health and protection has been constant and is not likely to diminish during the recession.

Sales and Marketing – Business need to market more aggressively in hard times. Skilled marketing and salespeople working on commission pay basis would keep their jobs even during the recession days.

IT and computing Services – IT services need to function always. Skilled people working to provide Web design, internet-based, computer and IT-related services in core business functions would still be in high demand throughout the recession and more during the next upswing.

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.