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E-Learning Course Catalogue

Internet Business Academy

Practical Training & Mentoring
HM Internet Business Academy is a practical training and mentoring program where we train people on the various ways so they can earn money on the Internet and at the same time mentor them till they earn money from the internet.
Set in a conducive atmosphere with each student’s  computer connected to the internet, the training is carried out by me and another seasoned professional who actually make money from the courses they teach. The training will be carried out with the aid of power point presentations, videos and practical step-by-step illustrations.
For those who are unable to come by to our office, to receive the practical training, you will soon have the option to be taught online through downloadable ebooks, step-by-step lessons, videos and real time video sessions and a forum
As a practical training, each student will be urged to try out what they have been taught and they will be guided by me or the other tutor.
It is our hope that within the first 3 months of  training each student should be able to make a living through the internet. Thats what the academy/ training course  is all about, though this is based on the effort of the students
Courses Taught At HM Internet Business Academy include:
In the near future we would add some more.
You can click on the blog to read free and useful contents in any of our courses. You can join to become a member by clicking on the membership page
 

Course Description & Costs

Course Description & Costs

Coaching details

Business Coaching

Did you know it costs 10 times more to find a new client than it does to sell to an existing client. 30 % of your clients will buy more of your products or services if you offer at point of sale…

With Business coaching – if you want massive differences in boosting sales and profits you need to focus on improving these key areas we can help:

Lead Generation, Social Media, Local Business Marketing, Lead Capture, Sales Conversions, Performance Coaching, Word Press Web Design, Repeat and  Referral Sales etc…

 Career Advice/ Career Coaching
We have a team of affiliate employment, job and career coaches who work with those unemployed, under employed, unhappily employed,  to help them identify and appreciate their skills and experience in order to proactively pursue a promotion or market themselves confidently for a new position.

Job Coaching

Job coaching can be provided to people on a short-term basis. But for long-term success, there needs to be an emphasis on natural support.

Employability Workshops

Job Search Workshop
 The job search workshop is a one-week comprehensive course where
participants learn proper job search techniques in Canada. A
supportive and multicultural learning environment is provided.
 
Topics covered are:
 •Cover Letter Writing
 •Resume Writing
 •Interview Skills
 •Hidden Job Market
 •Workplace Communication
 •Labour Market Information
 •Hard/Soft/Transferable Skills
 •Networking
 •Employment Standards
 •Effective Job Search Strategies

Complete Resume Services
 

Canada Employee Sponsored visas

Canadian Company Sponsorship

These work visas are designed for Canadian Companies  that are able to recruit highly skilled workers either from overseas or from people temporarily in Canada where an employer has been unable to fill their recruitment needs from the Canadian labour market or through their own training efforts. There are both temporary visa options and permanent visa options. Below is an outline of these visas:

Temporary Sponsorship Options
Canadian businesses that need to have their skilled positions filled but cannot find workers from within the Canadian labour force, can sponsor personnel from overseas on a temporary basis, to work in  Canada for up to 4 years.

The most common visa available under the temporary arrangements is:

Sponsorship by Canadian or overseas businesses
There are 3 steps in the application process to bring in temporary overseas staff:

Sponsorship
Business sponsorship approval must be obtained by the business wishing to sponsor overseas workers. The business demonstrates that it is of good standing, shows the benefits of an overseas employee, and provides adequate training plans and expenditure. Employers are required to meet a number of undertakings in relation to the sponsored employee.   For instance  licensed  lawyers will personally meet with the  Canadian Employer and provide any documentation required for the process.   License Canadian lawyers  will compile and professionally submit the application by mail.  Oline applications would  only be safe within Canada , as this  method of application could provide quicker processing times.

Nomination
The nomination must relate to an occupation that meets a minimum skills threshold covering managerial, professional, associate professional and trade occupations.  Check  for instance (BC PNP) . An occupation is selected and you need to meet the correct qualifications and work experience that pertains to that occupation. There are criteria applicable for the nomination and licensed lawyers will provide the information required to both the Canadian company and the nominee to ensure that a comprehensive application is submitted.

Visa Application
The overseas skilled employee that is nominated must apply for a visa to enter and remain in  Canada. The application will need to demonstrate that they have the skills and qualifications applicable to the nominated occupation. Other criterion needs to be met and licensed migration lawyers will provide the required information to the applicant and will professionally compile and submit the application by mail or in person  for priority processing.

How to Open a foreign Business in Canada

 Question: Can I Start a Small Business in Canada When I’m Not Living in Canada?

General answer:
Yes, starting a business in Canada when you’re nonresident in Canada is possible – but certain requirements have to be met.

Answer #1:

The short answer is that in order to come to Canada and start a business per regulations, a  non -Canadian must:

1. Prove that business immigrant have at least CDN $400,000 net worth or confirmation that you have access to a similar amount of funds from other sources; or $500,000* USD in special cases (see below).

2. Willingness to invest a minimum of$200,000 to establish a new enterprise (or to purchase no less than 33% of an existing business).

3.Plan a business that will clearly increase the Canadian Economy (no nonprofits).

4.Create at least 10 permanent full-time paycheck jobs for people that are already either Canadian Citizens or Permanent Residents.

5. Intend to become a Permanent Resident or Canadian Citizen. Provisions can be made for the immigration of spouse and dependents in the immigration package as well, but they cannot be workers in the 10 new full-time jobs created. Check this “open house” in the provinve of Alberta  or check the  Self-Employed Farmer Stream *

Answer # 2:

As a non-canadian you need  a Canadian address (not a Post Office box, but a real Canadian address). Then you can start registering your new business in the province that it’s located in.

Then proce to which structure your business is going to be (sole proprietorship, partnership, etc). Or you could form a partnership with a Canadian living in Canada; then you can use his/her address for starting your business in Canada.

Another approach is to start an incorporated business. You would still need a Canadian address to enjoy the tax benefits of having a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation (see Types of Corporations in Canada and Corporate Tax), as well as have the correct number of Canadians on your Board of Directors and meet all the other requirements for such a corporation.

The correct number of resident Canadians depends on the jurisdiction you incorporate in. In Canada you may incorporate federally or provincially for starters. How to Incorporate Your Business in Canada Consultancy  explains the advantages and disadvantages of each of these forms of incorporation and the basic procedure.

“Foreign investors need to be aware of the residency requirements imposed on the directors of companies incorporated in Canada. The federal statute requires that 25 per cent of the directors be resident in Canada. In case there are fewer than four directors, then the CBCA (Canada Business Corporations Act) requires that one director be resident in Canada. Each province has different residency requirements and an investor wishing to incorporate in Canada should consider this issue. For example, some provinces do not impose residency requirements for directors (e.g.: New Brunswick, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Yukon).” ( See also  Invest In Canada)
These residency requirements for the directors of companies incorporated in Canada apply to all types of Canadian corporations, not just Canadian Controlled Private Corporations.

See Forms of Business Ownership in Canada for more on the differences between sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations.

Everything written above assumes that you are going to continue to be a nonresident. If you are not a Canadian citizen you cannot just come to Canada and start a business. Instead, you would have to apply to immigrate to Canada through Canada’s Business Immigration Program or stay where you are but team up with one or more Canadian citizens or landed immigrants to start a business in Canada.

British Columbia and then Ontario  leads the country in the number of new business start-ups.  Seeking out business opportunities in Canada?  Contact Us 

Immigrant Entrepreneurship: Creating New opportunities

Immigrants: Starting a business in Canada

The Immigrant Entrepreneur Visa Category is intended for prospective immigrants who propose to establish a new business or who propose to purchase all or part of an existing business that has supportable prospects for expansion in any province in Canada

 The Canadian goverment  is also ramping up our support for immigrant entrepreneurs, those  who’ve long been a tremendous source of innovation in  Canada.  Immigrants are twice as likely as native-born  Canadian to start companies – although a greater proportion also struggle to keep their businesses open for longer than a year.  That’s why  the Canadian goverment has been creating  a new competition that challenges community-based organizations to come up with programs that can help immigrant businesses across the city grow to scale.  At the same time,  in many provinces the Canadian goverment is has been offering some of  its  business courses and programs  in Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Russian – which will allow us to connect to hundreds of new businesses in our immigrant communities. Read here  about  a Business Immigrant Mentorship Program

 There are four types of entrepreneurs who contribute substantially to economic development and job creation in Canada.

The categories are not mutually exclusive as some business characteristics can be found across these typologies but they do have distinct characteristics.

  • Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses
  • Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators.
  • Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
  • Immigrant Transnational Businesses

1. Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses:  These are low-to-moderate-income (LMI) businesses, largely retail and personal services. They start small and frequently stay small and usually locate their businesses in economically distressed areas with lower rents. .eg. http://tortillerialamexicana.ca/

This group has special challenges that include limited English; low familiarity with Canadian cultural and business practices; little or no credit history and little or no business and/or management education.

 The businesses are alternatives to wage employment and involve extremely long hours and hard work. Employees are more often than not other family members. The goal of the business owners, often called “Necessity Entrepreneurs”, is to make a life for themselves, their families and to ensure their children’s future. They usually do not expect to pass on the business to their children and frequently note that they are working extraordinarily hard so their children can get an education and not have to work as hard. However, some of these business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

2. Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators

These entrepreneurs apply their scientific education and expertise to the creation of a product or service in technology or medical drugs/treatments. The goal of the business owner is often, but not always, to develop the technology and have it acquired by a larger company clearing the way for creating new products and services.

3. Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
These are businesses in real estate, manufacturing, retail, wholesale, transportation, construction, leisure and hospitality, etc. They are the core businesses that drive the province, regional and national economies and become important employers in their community and province.

These businesses are credited with revitalizing economically depressed neighborhoods and communities. These business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

4. Immigrant Transnational Businesses

These businesses are a new phenomenon of “Keeping Feet in Both Worlds”. Immigrant transnationalism refers to the regular engagement in economic, political and socio-cultural activities spanning national borders.

These transnational entrepreneurs are playing an important role in facilitating international trade, investment and “diaspora tourism”. They are a heterogeneous group coming from many countries, crossing ethnic, immigrant and minority boundaries possessing different motivations and experiences.  Now within it , there are four distinct types of immigrant transnational enterprises: Circuit firms involved in the transfer of goods and remittances across countries; Cultural enterprises that rely on their daily contacts with the home country and depend on the desire of immigrants for cultural goods in Canada such as shows, CDs and newspapers; Ethnic enterprises that are small retail firms catering to the immigrant community, which depends on a steady supply of imported goods; Return migrant enterprises that are businesses established by returnees that rely on their contacts in Canada.

Start a business in Canada ! , Your opportunity is now businesses, create jobs for their community and wealth for their families. That’s why they are often called “Opportunity Entrepreneurs”.

 Learn how we can support you and help you make your business flourish. If you are exploring entrepreneurship, our orientation workshops are the perfect place to start. Begin your entrepreneurial journey with Hineni Media and the workshops, multi-week classes, and events. We offer for women and men at every stage of the entrepreneurial cycle.

This fall, connect with the resources you need to start your business or bring your existing business to new heights, and discover why Hineni Media is the place where success grows.

Onward and upward,

Marisol Diaz

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

10 great Canadian Franchises bets

Start your own franchise or business opportunity in Canada. Learn more about available franchise opportunities for sale in Canada.  That can be the rightful,legal and prompt way to settle, live and work in Canada.

Franchise generally means a right or privilege. Wouldn’t you love to earn that privilege in Canada?

Franchising, a business method that involves licensing of trademarks and methods of doing business, such as:

  • Chain store, retail outlets which share a brand and central management
  • An exclusive right, for example to sell branded merchandise
  • Media franchise, ownership of the characters and setting of a film, video game, book, etc., particularly in North American ( US/Canada) usage

Did You Know? More Canadians own franchises per capita than anywhere else in the world! Own a franchise and be in business for yourself, but not by yourself. Take advantage of the experience and success of a proven franchise system to help meet your financial and business goals! Franchising represents a way to tap into existing market needs and growth industries without assuming all of the risk associated with independent business startups.

We have mentorship experience with franchised business opportunities in all five main franchise industries! There are Food Franchise Businesses, Retail Franchises, Automotive Franchises, Business to Business Franchises, and Home/Personal Franchises. Which one is right for You? Check here  10 popular Canadian Franchises.

Turn Your Dreams of Work and Business Ownership Into A Reality!

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.


Most Canadian Popular Franchises

 Do you dream of being a franchise owner? Scope out this list of the most popular brands over the past decade — and how well their owners have done at repaying startup loans backed by the  Canada Small Business.

Tim Hortons Inc. (TSX: THI, NYSE: THI) is a Canadian fast casual [3] restaurant known for its coffee and doughnuts. It is also Canada’s largest fast food service with over 3000 stores nationwide.

Tim Hortons has one of the most successful marketing operations in Canada, approaching the level of a symbol of national identity. With powerful and effective branding, the store has established itself in the top class of fast-food restaurants in Canada.

Dollarama & Great Canadian Dollar Store

Dollarama is a chain of over 652 dollar stores across Canada. The company is headquartered in Montreal and is Canada’s largest retailer of items for 2 dollars or less, since 2009. [2] Many of its stores are located in the province of Quebec where the chain first began. The first Dollarama store was created at the shopping centre “Les promenades du St-Laurent” in Matane. Dollarama now has stores in every province of Canada, with Ontario having the most stores.

 7-11 Convenience Store: 7-Eleven offers an extended hour, retail convenience store, providing groceries, take out foods and beverages, dairy products, non-food merchandise, specialty items and selected services which emphasize convenience to the customer.

Burger King Corporation 
Fast food hamburger restaurants. Home of the Whopper and chicken sandwiches, fish sandwiches, and salads.
 
Total Investment  $1,000,000
Minimum Cash Required

 Second Cup: is Canada’s largest Canadian-based specialty coffee retailer, operating more than 360 cafés across Canada.[1] Founded in 1975 by Tom Culligan and Frank O’Dea, Culligan eventually purchased O’Dea’s shares. After building it to a 150-store chain, he sold it in 1988 to Michael Bregman.

 Mary Brown’s is a Canadian fast-food restaurant chain most popular for its Big Mary sandwich, chicken and ‘taters’ or potato wedges. Its process involves marinating chicken for up to 48 hours prior to cooking. The company has 83 locations in Canada: 38 in Newfoundland and Labrador, 30 in Ontario, 12 in Alberta, and three in Nova Scotia. It advertises using the slogans Now we’re talkin’ chicken!!!  Famous chicken & taters!
Subway. Home of the $5 footlong sub, Subway is the biggest fast-food chain in the world, with almost 33,000 outposts in 91 countries.

The initial franchise fee startup is $15,000, a fairly low sum compared to other brands.

The combination of global branding, minimal upfront outlay of cash, and low loan default rates have made Subway the most popular brand in the last decade for entrepreneurs looking to open a franchise, according to the SBA’s lending data.

Quiznos. The shop known for its toasted subs looks like a riskier investment than its formidable competition, Subway: One in four franchise owners was unable to make good on their SBA-backed loan.

The typical startup fee for a new Quiznos franchise is $25,000, but in an effort to add stores to its 5,000-member army, Quiznos announced last week that it would slash that upfront cost to $5,000 for entrepreneurs who already have restaurant management experience.

The UPS
UPS scooped up business services and shipping center Mail Boxes Etc. in 2001 and promptly rebranded almost all of the locations as The UPS Store

 Dairy Queen

Dairy Queen celebrates its 70th birthday this year, and its famous Blizzard treat — blended soft serve ice-cream with candies, cookies and fruits — turns 25.

Berkshire Hathaway, the company run by legendary investor Warren Buffet, acquired the iconic company in 1998. Today, it boasts 5,700 locations around the globe and a single-digit failure rate for its SBA-backed franchise loans, making it one of the safer investments in the food franchise market. A first-time owner will face a $35,000 initial license fee.
 Days Inn
Days Inn is another member of the Wyndham Hotel Group’s franchise family. Launched in 1970, the chain currently boasts 1,900 hotels throughout 15 countries.

 

Curves for Women

Women like the “no makeup, no men, and no mirrors” philosophy and 30-minute workout regime: Curves has grown exponentially since its first location launched in Texas in 1992. It now claims 10,000 locations in 70 countries and 4 million members.

The overhead costs are pretty low, but the investment can be risky. Curves’ fast expansion goes hand in hand with a relatively high churn rate, and almost 16% of its SBA-backed franchise loans this decade failed. The company topped Entrepreneur magazine’s annual “fastest-growing franchises” list in 2003 and 2005, but this year, it didn’t make the top 100.

Mr Lube is a Canadian chain of automotive service centres, specializing in oil changes and other scheduled maintenance. It has almost 100 locations in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. It was founded in 1976 by Clifford Giese, who opened its first location in Edmonton, Alberta. Mr. Lube is the largest quick oil chain in Canada.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK  is a franchised moving company, headquartered in Lansing, Michigan, with franchises in 32 states in the United States, as well as Canada and Ireland. The company is the largest franchised moving company in the United States. It has more than 200 locations.

  Internet Franchise WSI 
Over a decade of successful franchising and another new record; WSI ranks among the Top 50 companies listed in the 2006 Entrepreneur Magazine’s Annual Franchise 500 – the franchise industry’s equivalent of the Fortune 500 public index. For the sixth consecutive year, WSI has maintained its position as the world’s #1 Internet and Technology Services Franchise.

WSI also holds the singular distinction as the only Canadian company in the Entrepreneur Magazine’s list of Top Ten Global franchises offering international opportunities.

 

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.