Posts Tagged ‘ Self-employees working in non-regulated professions in Canada ’

How Canadian labor market information can help you

Labour market information can change your life  It really can and in fact, it probably already has.
 
Labour market information is data about the world of work, including about different types of work and learning opportunities. It also includes labour market trends and forecasts about future employment growth.
 
Labour market information can help you:
 
•    Find work – it can help you to tap into the hidden job market – most job openings aren’t advertised. Information about who is hiring or who may be hiring in the near future can help you focus your job search.

•    Choose an education or training program – finding out which training credentials employers are looking for, and where suitable programs are offered, is an important part of making a wise choice when it comes to choosing a program.

•    Choose an occupation – if you are going to spend time and money preparing for an occupation, it’s worthwhile to do some research first. What is a typical day on the job like? How good are the employment prospects? What is the average salary range?
 

Summing up, the chances of accessing a labor platform, take time and it depend exclusively in the professional conditions that you have achieved until now. The best possible advice would be for you to gather up pertinent information regarding the work market of the Canadian city you wish to move to.

My experience also as  Career & Work Information Service Provider, I recommend job seekers identify companies of interest and proactively and creatively contact senior managers regarding their candidacy.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  or  the Canadian Employers Directory  ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Our Canadian database  for Int’l Employers !

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Search for Jobs or Seasonal Visa Jobs  in Canada. Available only to premium subscribers.


How to apply in Canada as an independent professional immigrant

Who can apply as an independent professinal immigrant?  

Anyone in the world outside Canada can apply for permanent residence as an independent applicant. If you are a visitor in Canada and decide that you want to live in Canada, you will be required to apply for permanent residence from abroad or your country of origin.  

What are the advantages of going to Canada as an independent immigrant?   

As soon as you arrive in Canada, you are given the status of a permanent resident. You can live, study and work in Canada permanently. You will also enjoy the benefits from all social programs available to any Canadian citizen. You can work with any employer or get any job. 

After 3 years of permanently residing in Canada, you can now apply to become a Canadian Citizen!  Note that Canada also allows dual citizenship and does not require their citizens to renounce their other citizenships. So when you become a Canadian citizen, you can still maintain the other citizenships that you got from other countries.

 What is the difference between Canadian Permanent Visa and a USA Immigration H1B Visa?

The US immigration system selects skilled workers with a right to work in the United States. But, the US immigration system does not easily approve permanent residency status. Many of these skilled workers on an H1B status can be sent back to their home country if their Green Card is not approved before the 6-year limit on H1s expires. Then after obtaining your green card, you may have to wait  for years before you can get the  US citizenship. 
under the the Canadian Skilled Class Immigration system, skilled workers once approved,  you are automatically given the permanent residency status. This entitles you to change employers, relocate, and sponsor family members to emigrate which is not available under the US H1B visa. Even if you lose your job, you can still remain in Canada and enjoy most of the rights and privileges accorded to a Canadian citizen.
Advantages for professional immigrants in Canada

Work years and academic capacities are not forgotten in Canada. This is mainly because Canada does not only need people for manufactured jobs, but it is also looking for people that are trained in different knowledge areas.
 
 
 I am a professional. What does Canada has to offer me? Advantages for professional immigrants.

The Canadian federal government has performed some projections, which imply that in a period of time, of less than 15 years, there will be a really high professional demand in their national territory, and this deficit will not be covered by Canadians by themselves.

This is why, knowing this situation, there are better opportunities to access a permanent residency visa, for those appliers that already have a profession; and specially, for those professions that are considered a priority by the Canadian federal government, or by it high demand on Canada’s work market.

 
 
 Some areas that are considered as a priority are health, informatics technology, and teaching. Because, the category that the immigrant will receive for working in any of those areas, is the independent immigrant rank.

 
The programs Skilled Worker Immigration, is a special program for professional workers that are looking for the permanent residency. Among other requirements to reach the minimum score you need in their evaluation system, you have to accomplish the following items:

– English or French domain (both official languages in Canada), accreditation of the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) certificate for English and the TEF (Test d’Evaluation de Francais) for French.
– Ages between 21 and 49 years old.
– Educational level: certification of higher education
– Previous work experience (at least one year of experience)
– Show quick adaptation to new environments capacity (conjugal situation, the existence of a work offer in Canada)
– Existence of working precedents in Canada (if the applier has obtained a previous temporary work permission)

 
 
It is also valid to write down that the applier must show that he can improve in some way the Canadian economy. There are some demands regarding the fulfillment of some health conditions and criminal records (not having any criminal record at all).

The main objective of this program is to attract people that are prepared in knowledge areas, which are required due to the Canadian work situation. The Skilled Worker Immigration program, offers as a main advantage the possibility of making and individual or familiar (parents and sons) immigration.

On the other hand, in 2006, the law of Fair Access for Regulated Professions was approved, which forces different institutions to perform fair evaluation processes, regarding the grades of professionals that were educated in other nations, and whose professions are regulated in Canada (Engineering, Medicine, etc.). This law also authorized the creation of an Assistance Center, for those immigrants that are having difficulties in the process of revalidation of their professional credentials.

In some governments of the Canadian provinces, such as Ontario’s government, there are special programs such as Internship for the Internationally Trained. This program was designed to help foreign professionals in their integration into the local labor force. It consists in giving away training platforms, which last for 6 months; they require a minimum of 3 years of previous work experience.

Summing up, the chances of accessing a labor platform, take time and it depend exclusively in the professional conditions that you have achieved until now. The best possible advice would be for you to gather up pertinent information regarding the work market of the Canadian city you wish to move to.

My experience also as  Career & Work Information Service Provider, I recommend job seekers identify companies of interest and proactively and creatively contact senior managers regarding their candidacy.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  or  the Canadian Employer Directory  ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

The Canadian database  for Int’l Employers

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Search for Health Jobs or Seasonal Visa Jobs  in Canada. Available only to premium subscribers.


 

 

Coming to Canada as a business immigrant

Starting a business is an excellent way to start your professional or career life in Canada.

Whether you are planning to come to Canada as a business immigrant, foreign investor or self-employed person, Hineni Media has a variety of resources to help you
 

Start your business in Canada

Canada is home to many world leading businesses and that does not happen by chance: the country combines everything a business needs to be successful, making it attractive to anyone wishing to invest in a new country and contribute to its growth.

If you have a great business idea and are ready to work hard to build it from the ground up, then you may wish to start your own business. But if you want to hit the ground running and avoid some of the common start-up pitfalls, then buying an existing business or a successful franchise may be a better option for you.

1) Start your own

Applies to: All of Canada

Are you interested in moving to Canada to start a business? If you are an experienced business person, you may be eligible to immigrate under the Business Immigration Program.

You can apply as an entrepreneur or self-employed person.

•Entrepreneurs need business experience, a minimum net worth of $300,000 and commit to owning and operating a business in Canada.
•Self-employed persons need to contribute to the cultural or athletic life in Canada, or purchase and manage a farm.
 

2) Buying a business or franchise

Buying into a franchise in Canada is a great way to start your own business and establish yourself in your new country.

Canada is home to the second largest franchise industry in the world, with over 75,000 units currently operating. Annual sales from Canadian franchises add up to over CA$100 billion, and over 500 franchisors from the US have branched out into the Canadian market.

What is franchising?

Franchising is a way of doing business where the franchisor authorises an individual or group (the franchisee) to offer, sell or distribute goods or services under their professional strategy or marketing plan. It is very effective for establishing and developing a brand and achieving a large market share. Franchises in Canada are generally classed as either ‘product or service’ or ‘business format’. While most franchises usually are more one category than the other, many still combine both aspects.

Benefits of buying a franchise
Buying into a franchise gives you the ability to run your own business and get involved with an established brand. Entering into a franchise as a newcomer to Canada can be a great idea, as there is a lower risk of failure and you’ll have the added security of start-up help.

There is a vast array of franchise opportunities ranging from coffee and pizza restaurants to gyms and home services. Start out by looking within a field of business that holds particular interest for you, or one in an area that you’re already know a lot about.

Be prepared for the franchise business
Starting a franchise can seem like a safe bet with guaranteed success, but there are pitfalls of which you should be aware. Thousands of people join the franchise community every year in Canada, and while statistics show that most prove to be successes, not everyone is cut out for it and it is imperative that a prospective franchisee knows what they’re in for.
It is important to note that purchasing a franchise can be expensive, with steep start-up and ongoing costs, and that you will be required to follow the guidelines set out by the franchisor. It is recommended you do your homework when considering with the type of franchise you’d like to buy. Some franchisors can be exceptionally strict with their regulations, so if you find it hard to take direction or prefer to go your own way, it is advisable to go with a franchisor who is more relaxed with their guidelines.

On the flipside, having rigid instructions can be beneficial when you’re unsure of a new industry and new to a country. This discrepancy also extends to the costs involved. Start-up and ongoing expenses can vary greatly depending on the industry and how established the franchise is.

Keep in mind that you have more to lose than the franchisor – you’re the one investing your money and livelihood in the business. You can and should ask a lot of questions and research the franchise as much as you can before getting involved and expect the same of the franchisor. Mutual respect and honesty is the best place to start.

Facts about franchising in Canada:
•97% of franchises that open in Canada are still in business five years later, and a full 86% are still operating under the original ownership.
•A new franchise opens in Canada every two hours.
•The average franchise fee in Canada is $25,000.
•One franchise operation exists for every 450 Canadians.

 
Looking for expert advice?

Hineni Consultancy

Business Opportunities How-to PDFs

Starting a Restaurant, Bar or Coffee Shop in Alberta
Starting a Convenience Store
Starting a Bed and Breakfast
Starting a Childcare Centre
Starting an Alternative and Complementary Health Care Business
Starting a Consulting Business
Starting a Personal Care Home for Seniors
Starting a Beauty Salon/Barber Shop/Esthetics/Tanning

Contact Hineni Consultancy  or  our Business Opportunities Database    if you are a business immigrant looking for more information on buying a small business

Canada: Work without a Work Permit

Canadian immigration policy allows certain workers to enter Canada without a work permit. However, Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) requirements may still apply.

You may not need a Work Permit if you fit under one of the following:

•Business Visitor
•Foreign Representative
•Military Personnel
•Foreign Government Officer
•Performing Artist
•On Campus Employee
•Athlete or Coach
•News Reporter
•Public Speaker
•Convention Organizer
•Clergy
•Judge or Referee
•Examiner or Evaluator
•Accident Inspector
•Crew
•Emergency Service Provider
 

Please submit an inquiry if you desire more information about whether you are qualified to work in Canada without a work permit or work status.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Work in Canada: The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program

•The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program (Quebec and British Columbia only);

Foreign individual (i.e., one who is not a Canadian permanent resident or citizen) who intends to work in Canada is typically required to possess a work permit or other authorization to legally do so. Such authorization may come in various forms, and often requires advanced approval prior to eligibility to enter Canada for work. Significant complexity may surround the process of securing the proper authorization to work in a foreign country.

The dynamic Information Technology (IT) Workers visa allows the fast-track processing of visa applications for skilled professionals in the software industry seeking to gain valuable Canadian work experience on a temporary basis. The Information Technology Work visa allows applicants with the required education and experience in the specified products or technologies applying for specific jobs to apply under this versatile program.

Applicants must be able to communicate in English or French, and provide evidence of sufficient experience in the specified IT industries and specified products or technologies. Once approved, applicants will be allowed to be issued a work permit following confirmation through Service Canada. This means that applicants can come to Canada quickly. Applicants are also eligible for work permit renewals.

MORE DETAILS

The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program was established through a collaboration of the Software Human Resources Council of Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and Citizenship and Immigration Canada as an effort to alleviate a shortage of software professionals in Canada. The requirement for a Labour Market Opinion application was removed for those professionals meeting the requirements of seven occupational definitions.

 The eligible occupations are:

•Senior Animation Effects Editor
•Multimedia Software Developer
•Embedded Systems Software Designer
•MIS Software Designer
•Software Products Developer
•Telecommunications Software Designer
•Software Developer – Services
The goal of the program continues to be to expedite the process of admitting foreign workers in the field of information technology. Eligible candidates are granted a “national confirmation” by HRSDC, and may proceed directly to applying for a Canadian work permit. As this program does not constitute a confirmation exemption, however, applicants with a destination in the province of Quebec are required to obtain a Certificate d’Acceptation du Quebec prior to a work permit.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WORKERS VISA REQUIREMENTS
Applicants for the Information Technology Workers visa must have an offer of employment for an eligible occupation from a Canadian employer which meets the following requirements:

•the wages and working conditions offered are commensurate for the position;
•the employer’s advertisement and recruitment efforts are sufficient;
•there is sufficient evidence of the labour market benefits related to the entry of the foreign worker;
•and whether the entry of the foreign worker is likely to affect the settlement of a labour dispute.
In order to apply for the Information Technology Workers visa, applicants must provide confirmation of possessing the required education and experience in the specified products or technologies required for the occupation. Applicants must also demonstrate proficiency in working in an English and/or French work environment.

 
Applications may be submitted to a Canadian visa office abroad or at a port of entry for those who are exempt from the requirement of a passport visa

 

PLEASE NOTE: This program terminated on September 30 2010 for most provinces. Other than Quebec and Brisitsh Columbia, cases submitted after this date will be subject to the requirement of a Labour Market Opinion. Foreign workers destined to Quebec and Brisitsh Columbia currently remain eligible for such applications

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

FINDING A JOB IN CANADA Occupations in Canada Non-Regulated fields(II)

 Regarding recognition questions there is a difference between academic and professional recognition. In Canada (as in most of the group8  countries) the higher education institutions are directly responsible for the academic recognition (admission, continuation of studies).

Credential recognition   or professional validation  is the recognition required to obtain the right to work in a certain field. Professional recognition differs between regulated and non-regulated professions. In the first case the authority in charge of the regulation of a certain profession must be determinable, as the authority regulating the education leading to a profession is also responsible for the recognition of foreign diplomas in this field. If the education or the right to work is not regulated, then the professional recognition lies solely within the responsibility of the employer. He or she decides whether the qualifications submitted by the candidate are adequate for the job in question. This applies both to Canadian and foreign nationals. However, the Federal Secretariat for Economic Affairs (feco) prescribes the quota regulations for foreign employees, which regulate the granting of work permits. Most self-employees working in non-regulated professions do not need professional recognition but it’s advisable. They are only dependent on the rules of the free market.

Some professions are not regulated but most of the professions in Canada are regulated. In other words, there are  prerequisites such as education, age, experience etc. to be met.

Regulated and Non-Regulated Professions and Occupations in Canada

About 20 per cent of Canadians jobs are “regulated occupations” that require individuals to be licensed, registered or certified before they can legally begin working. Regulated occupations are governed by a regulatory body or college that sets standards of practice, registers or licenses qualified applicants and disciplines members when necessary. The regulatory body is also responsible for assessing and evaluating the credentials of applicants.

Most health professions are governed by regulatory bodies. Some examples are doctors, dentists, nurses, dietitians, midwives, pharmacists, opticians, physiotherapists, naturopaths, psychologists and chiropractors.

Some examples of non-regulated professions include:

•Lawyers
•Accountants
•Architects
•Teachers
•Social Workers
•Veterinarians
•Funeral directors
 

The majority of jobs in Canada are “non-regulated occupations” that don’t require workers to be licensed or registered. Non-regulated occupations range from jobs requiring a lot of education and responsibility to little formal training. Some examples of non-regulated jobs are computer programmers, waiters, office managers, journalists, graphic designers and housekeepers.

Newcomers often choose to work in a non-regulated job while they become licensed in a regulated occupation. The Working in Canada Tool  can be used to determine if your occupation is regulated or non-regulated.

Recognized Trades
Workers must be certified to work in certain trades in Ontario; in other trades, certification is voluntary. Certification means you have passed a provincial examination and earned a Certificate of Qualification to work in a particular trade. Before writing the exam, you must prove that you have experience in the trade and provide a number of documents, including a Social Insurance Number (SIN) card, letters from previous employers or a current employer, letters from unions, certificates, diplomas, licences and official school transcripts.

Examples of certified trades include:

•Plumber
•Electrician
•Hairstylist
•Machinist
•Automotive service technician
•Sheet metal worker
 

Examples of trades in which certification is voluntary are: baker, painter, cabinetmaker, cement mason, chef, automotive painter, machine engine technician, locksmith, draftsperson, drywall finisher, powerline technician, roofer, educational assistant, early childhood educator and welder.

Many employers and unions ask for a Certificate of Qualification even though certification is voluntary. To apply for certification, contact the Employment Ontario Network in person, online, or by calling the toll-free line 1-800-387-5656 (TTY 1-866-768-1157). Service is available in 25 languages.

It is a good idea to join a Canadian professional or trade association in your field. These associations are a good source of information about jobs and other information related to your trade. Members are usually required to pay annual fees or dues.

What’s the best source of  Canadian company information ? The company’s Website, of course! It’s absolutely amazing what you can find published on company Websites. You can either try directly entering the company name in your favorite browser.

The best source for conducting your initial Canadian company research is Hineni Database,  published by Hineni Media. This database, updated annually, provides general information about types of jobs within a large number of occupations; the outlook for job growth; working conditions; average earnings; education and training required; related occupations specially for internationally trained professionals; and sources for finding more information. The  database’s content   is an ideal  place to start your  Canadian search.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.