Posts Tagged ‘ Portable job & Portable business ’

Study and Work in Canada

Study and Work in Canada  

You are considered to be an ‘international student’ if you come to Canada, on a temporary basis, for the purpose of pursuing an accredited course of study.  To study in Canada, international students require a study permit, and in some cases a temporary resident visa, issued by Canada immigration authorities outside of Canada.  

  For more information on what you need to secure permission to study in Canada, consult the website of Citizenship and Immigration Canada.  This same blog explains how study and work experience in Canada in some posts and what can make you eligible for permanent residence in Canada in the “Canadian Experience” category.      

Working while you are a student in Canada      

As an international student in Canada you can get a job which will allow you to earn money and valuable work experience too.   In fact the Government of Canada offers special kinds of work permits just for you. 

There are three ways to benefit from work opportunities:

   •If you are a full-time student you can work on  the university campus you are registered  for up to 20 hours per week as soon as your academic program begins.

•Once you have completed six months of full-time study, you can apply for an off-campus work permit.  Usually international centres at any given university conducts sessions about off-campus work permits twice a month.  Attendance is mandatory at one of these sessions if you are interested in applying for an off-campus work permit.

•As you approach graduation, you may consider working in Canada for up to three years through the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program.  This program has  no restrictions on the location or the type of employment, and no requirement that you have a job offer before applying.  

  

These government programs require particular documentation and application processes. Our legal partners will help you to understand and navigate the system offering  Immigration Help Sessions year round.  

Creating Jobs and Wealth for Canadians

Profit From Your Canadian Immigrant Advantage

7 reasons it makes sense for you to pursue your entrepreneurial dream — today!

I know the idea can be intim­i­dat­ing. I started my last com­pany, a suc­cess­ful media ven­ture, as an immi­grant from the US. Although I spoke Eng­lish, I found many aspects of doing busi­ness in Canada  dif­fer­ent than in my home coun­try. It took me a while to real­ize that I had an edge that many immi­grants share. I call it Your Immi­grant Advan­tage.

Because I was new to this coun­try and get­ting to know it for the first time, I real­ized I could see oppor­tu­ni­ties that Canadians might over­look. Taking business administration training, I ulti­mately built a busi­ness in an untapped niche of the media. I closed it after two years and am excited to fol­low up with this new ven­ture, a long held dream for me.

You might won­der if now is a good time to start a busi­ness in Canada. There’s no deny­ing that an eco­nomic down­turn is going to bring chal­lenges to any busi­ness. But entrust­ing your future secu­rity to an employer that could lay you off at any moment can be just as risky. Start­ing a busi­ness, in con­trast, can bring you con­trol of your des­tiny and a chance to build sig­nif­i­cant wealth.

Here are seven rea­sons it makes sense to start a busi­ness in Canada.

1. There’s startup money out there. Even in a tight lend­ing cli­mate, it is pos­si­ble to find fund­ing in Canada.  Many Canada entre­pre­neurs get their start in busi­ness by bor­row­ing money from friends and fam­ily or sell­ing a small stake in a bud­ding ven­ture to an out­side investor. Even those who don’t have a rich uncle can join the proud legions of entre­pre­neurs who have “boot­strapped” their com­pa­nies from day one, fund­ing any growth from the sales they make.

2. Red tape.  Canada is not a far eas­ier place to start a busi­ness than almost any­where else. but, for instance, you can incor­po­rate in a few days. Canada has a bit of European lifestyle, if you do’t know your way around  bureau­cracy can squash the entre­pre­neur­ial spirit. You need a per­mit for every­thing you do.

3. Smart Labor Code . They tend to be employer friendly, for the most part, and are not as puni­tive in Euro­pean coun­tries if you need to let peo­ple go.  In Canada, there is much less flex­i­bil­ity for the busi­ness owner to react to chang­ing mar­ket conditions.

4. Less cor­rup­tion. If you have been frus­trated by a busi­ness cul­ture where pay­ing bribes is required to get things done, you may be relieved to know that laws against bribery in  Canada gen­er­ally get enforced.

5. Things work. Many  Canadians take it for granted that there is a robust, inde­pen­dent legal sys­tem; reli­able and cost effi­cient trans­porta­tion; a reli­able power infra­struc­ture; and an out­stand­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tions net­work. If you’ve lived in a coun­try where these things are not the norm, I am cer­tain you will appre­ci­ate how much they add to the ease of doing business.

6. An out­stand­ing tal­ent pool. The Canadian  uni­ver­sity sys­tem  offers a world-class edu­ca­tion – and has the work­force to match.

7. There’s no shame in upward mobil­ity. This is an entre­pre­neur­ial cul­ture that rewards inno­va­tion – and new­com­ers can join it quickly if they speak the lan­guage. Why not start pur­su­ing your Canadian dream today? I’d like to help you, by pro­vid­ing training   and  use­ful tips and inspi­ra­tion from other entre­pre­neur­ial immigrants.

Canada-Immigrants In Business Enterprise Sector

In Wise5,  a recent study of immigrant entrepreneurs funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, researchers found that immigrants who succeeded in business often followed a similar pathway.  Immigrants did not start new businesses right after arrival.  Rather, they first adjusted to living in Canada and learned about Canadian business culture.  Like Maria Luisa, many  worked in their field of interest first, learning Canadian practices and preferences first-hand, and finding a mentor who advised and helped them.  Often they pursued some upgrading, including language courses and business seminars.

“Immigrants are pulling their weight in the economy, and are just as likely — and sometimes even more likely — than Canadian-born [residents] to be business owners,” says Beverly Rodrigez, a senior fellow with the Bevor Consulting Services. “You see that immigration has grown a lot, and so has immigrant business ownership.”
People have a hard time understanding how immigrants can come into the economy without displacing native…workers,” says Barbara Ujamaa,  graduate student of an  Entreprenuership Program, which co-released a version of the report highlighting Ontario local implications. “But they create their own niche…. These small businesses that crop up fulfill a need…and become job creators.”

Beverly in her dissertation  pointed out that in Ontario, immigrant business ownership is closely linked to immigrant labor, which have both increased dramatically over the last twenty years.

Immigrant labor is a good thing, because it attracts these small entrepreneurs to come and fill a niche in our economy,” Beverly added.

Across the country,  Barbara says, the diversity of these businesses is also impressive. In addition to bigger tech companies, there are a lot of “bread and butter businesses,”  she says. “Grocery stores, nail salons, gas stations…that I think are making a pretty big difference. In many places, that’s what defines a neighborhood.”

La Mexicana Tortilleria y Antojitos.http://tortillerialamexicana.ca/   is an example of  small business ownership by a  recent female and immigrant entreprenuer.

If you are thinking of starting a business, take some time to inform yourself before making a decision.  Most Canadian cities have small business centres that can help you assess the advantages and disadvantages of different types of business, including regulations, licencing and certification.  They can also provide direction about writing a business plan, which is required for bank loans.  Some settlement organizations offer business services if not you can always count with our customized service here.

 

Entreprenuership Education Training

The Entrepreneurship  Training  is comprised of three (3) core trainings:

1. Business Plan Training (BPT): Series of four (4) workshops covering the following topics:

• Introduction to Entrepreneurship

 Identifying Business Opportunities

Types of Business (Legal Aspects of Business)

Understanding Customer Behavior

Understanding Marketing Concepts (Marketing Plan)

Selecting the Right Products/Pricing

Understanding Business Plan

Drafting a basic Business Plan

2. Financial Management Training (FMT): Series of two (2) workshops covering the following topics:

Understanding Financial Management

Developing Record Keeping Systems

Preparing and Interpreting Financial Statements

3.Loan Application Training (LAT): Series of two (2) workshops covering the following topics:

Developing a Financing Strategy

Structuring & Repaying Loans

Components of a basic Loan Application Package

Completing the Loan Application

After successfully completing the Entrepreneurship  Training,  clients will be able to receive individualized business counseling and participate in targeted workshops to learn about business issues not covered in the core trainings. Graduates of the Training  will also be eligible to apply for any Microenterprise Loans through special agencies. Contact here

 

 

Identifying Business Opportunities in Canada

Spotting market opportunities is essential for growth and survival. You need to know where to find these opportunities and understand how to take advantage of them.

There are a number of ways of working out what are the best opportunities for your business, including:

1.Carrying out an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of your business, and the opportunities and threats it faces (a SWOT analysis)

2. Establishing your unique selling point (USP)

To more effectively identify new business opportunities, you have to dig deep and ask lots of questions. Take a step back, and use these questions as a guide to help you create or adapt business strategies to meet the changing needs of your market.  For international students and international trained professionals in Canada which  are perfect  candidates for immigrant entreprenuership, your goal is to learn how to tell a good  oppotunity from a bad one. Here are some other tips:

  •  It is important to analyse the business you want to do. This will help you plan for the future.
  •  Franchise: having a solid financial base and a product that is sure to atract attention,
    The best business opportunities involved companies that offer something consumers will need or desire
    over all other competing products.
  •  New Business: keep in mind that new business or a plan to start a business may be riskier than going
    with a company with an established track record. However, business opportunities of this kind are to automatically suspect. If the funding is there and the organization is structured properly, the opportunitiy is well worth your consideration.
  •  You will find that in Today Canada’s market, it is worth your time to consider a web based business as well as home-based and more traditional business setting. The best business opportunities have a comprehensive and well  defined system for getting the products to consumers. This includes such factors as a reliable process for producing  the good or service, excellent sales and marketing strategies, and an efficient delivery to the buyer.
    Without the ability to sastify orders quickly and efficiently, even the best product is less likely to build a loyal client base.

 

For Advisory on entrepreneurial development  Training  click  here

How to Find Job Openings in Canada

How to Find Job Openings

In some countries, people find jobs primarily through the government or family members. In Canada self-reliance is more the rule, and secondly networking . It is important for everyone, including international students, to use a wide variety of resources to identify jobs.  About 20% of the jobs that exist in Canada are advertised in newspapers, trade magazines, or on the Internet. The other 80% of job openings are in the “hidden” job market and are never advertised. These positions are filled byword of mouth. For this reason, it is important to contact as many people as possible to find out about job openings. This technique is called networking.  Contacts include friends, classmates, neighbors, family members, professors, alumni, and community members.  Our blog  has many books on the job search and networking, as well as networking workshops and opportunities.

Working for International Companies

The best employment prospects for international students may be with international companies. International students are great assets to global organizations desiring language skills, respect for diversity, and/or knowledge of overseas economies. Occupations in Need of International Students.  According to the November 2012 edition of “Recruiting Trends,” health” and  high-tech firms are desperate to hire technically skilled, non-immigrant foreign workers. According to Canda immigration , from October 2009 to February 2010,  workers-visa  petitions were approved in the following areas:

 • Health Care & Social Assistants (hot)

•  Mining, oil and gas extraction ( hot)

• System’s Analysis and Programming (hot)

•Electrical/Electronics Engineering (hot)

•College and University Education (hot)

•Accountants and Related Occupations (3.7%) These statistics suggest that International students who wish to work in the Canadas would be wise to study technical and trade  subjects in order to increase their chance of employment. More detailed information on the occupations of approved  workers-visa petitions as well as the petitioners personal characteristics can be found in the following  Internationally Trained Professionals  Special Reports   which are part of the goverment web page.

 

 

Marisol Diaz is  SE , Entrepreneurship and Technology Trainer and author specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful  job and portable business opportunities for local and international trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting career opportunity in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, training and workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products

Int’l Student Employment Options-Canada

International students who come to Canada must have enough money to live and pay their bills while they are studying, without needing to work. However, in some situations, students may be able to work while they are studying. Working will give them experience in Canadian work settings; help them get to know the communities they’re living in; and let them earn extra money.

Students must not work without permission. If they do, they may be asked to leave Canada. They will also need a social insurance number to work in Canada. 

Canada’s MBA programs are trying to attract the world’s top students—and keep them here as residents after they graduate. As of 2008, and we are in 2012 all students who complete a two-year Master’s degree automatically have the right to stay in the country and work for three years. They do not need to have a job lined up and are not restricted to working in a particular field.  80 per cent of foreign MBAs at the school choose to stay and work in Canada immediately after their MBAs.

 We advise international students who plan to work in Canada to stay and work for a Summer , or find Summer employment at home in their field of study. Otherwise, she said it could take longer to find a career after graduation.

 International students who come to Canada must have enough money to live and pay their bills while they are studying, without needing to work. However, in some situations, students may be able to work while they are studying. Working will give them experience in Canadian work settings; help them get to know the communities they’re living in; and let them earn extra money.

Students must not work without permission. If they do, they may be asked to leave Canada. They will also need a social insurance number to work in Canada.

If you are interested in working in Ontario or B.C. for instance in Canada, the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation’s labour market section provides career resources for students and skilled immigrants, and career trends in Canada. The Province also provides comprehensive information about skilled immigrants and working in B.C. on the International Qualifications website

 

Resources

Students with a Job Offer – Ontario Immigration

BC On Jobs Plan

Playing the visa card Article

Marisol Diaz is  Business developer and author specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful career opportunities for local and international trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting career opportunity in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, training and Workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products