Posts Tagged ‘ Portable Employment-Relocation to Canada ’

How to Open a foreign Business in Canada

 Question: Can I Start a Small Business in Canada When I’m Not Living in Canada?

General answer:
Yes, starting a business in Canada when you’re nonresident in Canada is possible – but certain requirements have to be met.

Answer #1:

The short answer is that in order to come to Canada and start a business per regulations, a  non -Canadian must:

1. Prove that business immigrant have at least CDN $400,000 net worth or confirmation that you have access to a similar amount of funds from other sources; or $500,000* USD in special cases (see below).

2. Willingness to invest a minimum of$200,000 to establish a new enterprise (or to purchase no less than 33% of an existing business).

3.Plan a business that will clearly increase the Canadian Economy (no nonprofits).

4.Create at least 10 permanent full-time paycheck jobs for people that are already either Canadian Citizens or Permanent Residents.

5. Intend to become a Permanent Resident or Canadian Citizen. Provisions can be made for the immigration of spouse and dependents in the immigration package as well, but they cannot be workers in the 10 new full-time jobs created. Check this “open house” in the provinve of Alberta  or check the  Self-Employed Farmer Stream *

Answer # 2:

As a non-canadian you need  a Canadian address (not a Post Office box, but a real Canadian address). Then you can start registering your new business in the province that it’s located in.

Then proce to which structure your business is going to be (sole proprietorship, partnership, etc). Or you could form a partnership with a Canadian living in Canada; then you can use his/her address for starting your business in Canada.

Another approach is to start an incorporated business. You would still need a Canadian address to enjoy the tax benefits of having a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation (see Types of Corporations in Canada and Corporate Tax), as well as have the correct number of Canadians on your Board of Directors and meet all the other requirements for such a corporation.

The correct number of resident Canadians depends on the jurisdiction you incorporate in. In Canada you may incorporate federally or provincially for starters. How to Incorporate Your Business in Canada Consultancy  explains the advantages and disadvantages of each of these forms of incorporation and the basic procedure.

“Foreign investors need to be aware of the residency requirements imposed on the directors of companies incorporated in Canada. The federal statute requires that 25 per cent of the directors be resident in Canada. In case there are fewer than four directors, then the CBCA (Canada Business Corporations Act) requires that one director be resident in Canada. Each province has different residency requirements and an investor wishing to incorporate in Canada should consider this issue. For example, some provinces do not impose residency requirements for directors (e.g.: New Brunswick, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Yukon).” ( See also  Invest In Canada)
These residency requirements for the directors of companies incorporated in Canada apply to all types of Canadian corporations, not just Canadian Controlled Private Corporations.

See Forms of Business Ownership in Canada for more on the differences between sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations.

Everything written above assumes that you are going to continue to be a nonresident. If you are not a Canadian citizen you cannot just come to Canada and start a business. Instead, you would have to apply to immigrate to Canada through Canada’s Business Immigration Program or stay where you are but team up with one or more Canadian citizens or landed immigrants to start a business in Canada.

British Columbia and then Ontario  leads the country in the number of new business start-ups.  Seeking out business opportunities in Canada?  Contact Us 

Immigrant Entrepreneurship: Creating New opportunities

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The Canadian job market & Employment opportunities in it.

Immigrants come to Canada with dreams of a better life. But their job prospects here are often so minimal, that dream sometimes becomes a nightmare.

In order to increase your changes for a better employment you do need to master the following steps:

First

Writing Your Resume – Your resume is the most effective way to sell yourself.

Job Hunting Tips: -Those who find jobs are successful because they know how to conduct an effective job search.

Preparing For Job Interviews – Perhaps the most important key to a successful interview is to be well prepared for it and to have some knowledge of what to expect.
Employment Programs – Check sections for information on Canadian Government Employment Programs.

Online Employment Resources –  Here you’ll find a list of links in the following categories: 2Careers, Labour Market Info, Resume Help, Starting Your Own Business, Volunteering and Job Search Resources.

There are tons of jobs out there that the Web knows nothing about!
The majority of Canada’s economic growth is concentrated in the four major cities: Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and Montreal. Unemployment is higher in the Atlantic Provinces, such as Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island. If you are seeking employment in Canada and you do not posses a work permit, you should be aware that it is more difficult to find a job this way. A prospective employer would need to obtain a work permit on your behalf. Many companies are reluctant to do this as it involves spending time and money with lawyers.

Qualifications and skills

If you are looking for a well-paid professional position, high bilingualism with paid for. I mean English and French language  skill ability is essential. In Quebec, companies will require excellent knowledge of the French language. Always English-French bilinguals are in demand; many companies have to do business with both English- and French-speaking Canada.
It is important that you find out what types of jobs are in demand now and in the future. This information will be extremely useful in your employment or 2career planning
There is also a significant underground job market in Canada. Many individuals working on construction sites and some other manual labour positions may not have a work permit. Although this is also an option, we do not recommend working without a work permit as this increases the risk of being deported and being forbidden to come back to Canada.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.


Cross Cultural Training for business immigrants

This training has two modules.

 1. Cross Cultural Training for business immigrants who come to start a business or work in Canada.
 2. Language Assesment
 
 
1.Cross Cultural Training for business immigrants who come to start a business or work in Canada.
 
As Canada integrates herself with immigrants in the global economy, attracts foreign capital and acquires companies abroad interaction with the global business community is on the rise. This module is useful for professionals doing business with Canada.

Topics vary from Canadian culture to strategies for interacting, communicating with colleagues, business partners and associates. Real life situations are used to make the interaction lively and useful. The module helps you discover Canada through a combination of slides and photographs.

The deeper purpose of this module is to provide insights so that an expatriate achieves greater success through his professional interaction. Some of the topics covered are:

 
1.  Canada’s culture and social customs. 
2. Verbal communication
3. How do I build bonds with colleagues?
4. Tips on what you need to be careful about? 
5. Business etiquettes. 
6. If the expatriate is a man, nature of interaction with female colleagues. 
7. Virtual tour of Canada 
8. Insights on topics that some people associate with Canada like caste etc. 
 
 
We seek to understand your requirements through a Needs Assessment Form  that is to be filled up by every person who is going to attend the workshop. Based on the feedback received we customize the training for you. 
 
Format:
 
1. One day workshop (includes lunch).
2. What is fundamental to  Canada?
3. Number of participitants – maximum 15-18. 
4. Could be from the same or different companies. 
5. We conduct one to one interactive sessions for CEO’s, Senior Management, Consulate employees and provide comprehensive Business Consulting advice and cross cultural training.
 
 
Who should attend: 
 
1. Business Entrepreneurs who are coming to work in Canada.
2. Expatriates who are doing business with Latin America. 
3. Non Resident immigrants returning to Canada after a number of years. 
4. Employees working for the Hospitality, Information Technology, BPO and Manufacturing sectors and Consulates / Trade Commissions. 
 
 
After the workshop: 
 
1. You are welcome to email us about how deal to with specific situations or any other questions. This would be provided at no cost to you. 
2. You will receive a Newsletter that shares insights, tells you about cultural events and provides links to pictures on Canada etc. 
 
 
Interactive:
 
1. If you have any questions on why Canadians  behave or think the way they do, importance of certain cultural symbols, how to deal with a specific situation at work or any other cross cultural matters email us your queries (go to Contact Us section) and be assured of a prompt reply. 
2. You can share your experiences of working and living in Canada through an article not an exceeding 1000 words. Links to the article would appear on our site. When you send us the article let us know whether we should post name and email id of author on the site. 
 
 
The module is designed and delivered by Mrs Diaz. In addition to his professional roles, Mrs Diaz makes time to run a site www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org). This site, whose archive now counts over 400 essays and 1,600 pictures single-mindedly, focuses itself on demystifying Canada for Canadians and foreigners alike. corporate/consulting and Hineni backgrounds give her a unique understanding of Canada. 

Facilitation Program for business immigrant and entreprenuers

Facilitation Services
 

Hineni Cross cultural division has been facilitating numerous  Canada-Foreign business ventures since its inception .  Almost every global business venture that the firm has managed invariably included an extensive degree of communicative, cross-cultural and operational facilitation.

Also when business immigrants are ready to start their own franchise, they’ll be able to set their own course, and create their own wealth.   It’s no secret that several people have made millions by running their own franchise, and at Hineni, we have discovered why. When you work a normal job, doing what your boss says, getting the same yearly cost of living increase. No matter how hard you work, you seem to be stuck on a treadmill. But at Franchise Opportunities   abound in Canada as way not only to get established and prosper but to open employment jobs to  others. We believe facilitation programs for business immigrants and entrepreneurs are  a great  idea.

Hineni CC’s principals have more than fifteen years of combined experience in the art of managing day-to-day interactions between Canadians businesspersons and their foreign investors  counterparts. Experience has shown that dedicated facilitation and resolution of communicative and culture generated challenges can be critical to the success of global ventures. Consultative intervention by an experienced facilitator who is intimately familiar with the foreign business environment and its unique cultural mindset, can effectively avert impediments, reduce obstacles and improve overseas business outcomes.

 

Hineni CC’s Facilitation program is an “In-Process” version of our business consulting programs integrated with cross-cultural knowledge elements and personalized coaching services. Whereas consulting and coaching are typically more academic venues, our Facilitation program offers clients an opportunity to acquire real time coaching, insight, challenge analysis, and solution strategies for issues that arise while they are actively engaged in business processes either in Abroad or in Canada. Clients can leverage Hineni’s extensive experience and familiarity with business practices and cultures in both countries to either resolve complications, decode behavior and positions, or simply solicit advice on implementing the most constructive strategies for achieving business harmony and results. 

 

Facilitation services can be provided in person and on-site or can be delivered via phone or email and can include:

  •  Coaching, analysis and support services during negotiations.
  • Advice and support with language and communicative processes. 
  • Support in understanding and deciphering foreign business conduct. 
  • Tuning real time strategy adjustments occurring during the business process. 
  • Suggesting real time, case specific methodologies for motivating business partners. 
  • Support in developing team-building initiatives. 
  • Assistance with conflict evasion issues.

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.


Immigration Franchise:Canada

Business immigration offers a valuable source of new skills and new employment for Canada, and potential immigrants have a number of immigration options when applying for residence. One of these options is specifically aimed at the business sector and is of particular interest to franchisors and franchisees. It’s called the business immigration program.

The Canadian BIP or Business & Investor Program  caters for people who are interested in establishing a business in Canada either without living permanently in the country or to meet the relevant criteria for residence under the Entrepreneur category. These criteria are to contribute to economic growth through:

Increasing Canada’s level of human capital
Encouraging enterprise and innovation

Franchising is the practice of using another firm’s successful business model. The word ‘franchise’ is of anglo-French derivation – from franc- meaning free, and is used both as a noun and as a (transitive) verb.[1] For the franchisor, the franchise is an alternative to building ‘chain stores’ to distribute goods and avoid investment and liability over a chain.

Immigration & Franchising
The purpose of the Business & investor Visa scheme is to encourage experienced business people to bring capital, experience and know-how to Canada and by doing so to create employment and make a contribution to Canadian economy. An important Canada Immigration office’s role is to help ensure that we attract the right people and make sure that they have every chance to succeed.

If Canada wants such people and need them and Canada recognises that franchising is one of the easiest ways in which immigrants can enter the business market here in accordance with the above requirements. However, not all franchises meet the employment and investment criteria. The immigration Canada does have a certain amount of discretion and each case is judged on its own individual merits. Prospective applicants looking at franchises should therefore bear in mind all the above when researching their options.

When selecting a franchise, carefully consider a number of factors, such as the demand for the products or services, likely competition, the franchisor’s background, and the level of support you will receive. You also need to carefully consider how much money and time you are willing to invest in the franchise opportunity. Some people use franchising as a passive investment, while others use franchising to become “their own boss”.

The foreign market is enormous. People are out there looking for opportunities and growth, and Canada is a very attractive destination for them. If you take time to build the right relationships, and help them into your systems, you will find a new source of hard-working business-minded people.

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.


Canada – Visas and Work Permits

Canada – Visas and Work Permits
 
Are you wanting to work or re-locate to the Canada? Do you need to check if you need a work permit or do you want to apply now? Do you want to find out if you need a visa to be in the Canada? Here, Hineni have provided you with some information on working in Canada and have teamed up with its membersite  who can offer you further advice and assistance with any questions and queries you may have.
 
 What are Visas and Work Permits?
Firstly, here is an explanation of what a visa, a work permit and immigration actually is.
A visa is an official authorization appended to a passport, permitting entry into and travel within a particular country or region.
– A work permit is a generic term for a legal authorization, which allows a person to take employment. It is most often used in reference to instances where a person is given permission to work in a country where one does not hold citizenship,
– Immigration is the act of immigrating; the passing or coming into a country for the purpose of permanent residence.
It will depend on how long you want to go for, why you want to go and certain other factors as to which of the visas you must apply for.
 
 
Types of Visas
Canada offers a range of immigration opportunities and probably does more than most other countries to encourage skilled workers to move to Canada. There are four main categories for visas and there is also an option for a work permit:
Skilled Worker Class – The Skilled Worker Visa for Canada is the most popular way of applying for migration to Canada. This allows you to enter Canada with the right to work without first needing to find a job. Find out if you qualify by using a Canada Skilled Worker Points Calculator.
Business Class – Canadian Business Immigration offers three different Canada Business Visa categories for business immigration to Canada for potential migrants wishing to Invest or start a business in Canada.
Family Class – Canadian citizens and permanent residents living in Canada, 18 years of age or older, may sponsor close relatives or family members who want to become permanent residents of Canada.
Citizenship – Although you can’t apply for Canadian citizenship until you have lived in Canada for at least three years, you can be thinking about what it means from the moment you arrive.
Work Permits – A work permit for Canada can only be obtained if you have an offer of employment before applying for your Canadian work visa. Canada seeks to attract temporary skilled workers to fill positions that Canadian employers are currently having difficulty to fill by a Canadian Permanent Resident or Citizen.
Canada Visit Visa – Visit Canada with a Canadian Tourist Visa. A Canadian Visitor Visa will allow you to visit Canada for up to 6 months.
 
Visa Exemptions
 
Visas are required by everyone visiting Canada except the following for stays of up to six month:
1. nationals of countries; Britain, Australia,  USA, Other EU members and Japan.
2. nationals of EU countries (except Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovak Republic, who do require a visa);
3. nationals of Andorra, Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Botswana, Brunei, French Overseas Possessions and Territories, Greenland, Guernsey, Hong Kong (SAR), Iceland, Israel (National passport holders only), Jersey, Korea (Rep), Liechtenstein, Monaco, Namibia, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Switzerland and the Vatican City.
4. those visiting Canada who, during that visit, also visit the USA or St Pierre & Miquelon (a French Overseas Territory) and return directly to Canada as visitors.
 
 Types of Visa and Cost
Visitor: C$75 (single-entry); C$150 (multiple-entry). Family: C$400 (for families of six or more persons). Transit: gratis. Transit visas are necessary for all nationals who require a visitor visa. Employment: C$150 (individual); C$450 (group of three or more). Student: C$125. Prices are subject to frequent change.
  
Validity
Up to six months depending on circumstances of individual applicant.
 
Further Information
Please contact your local Embassy or Consulate or High Commission to find out further information about visas.  
 Hineni Media collects and provide diverse employment information, including employment procedures,
   working visas and Canada employment trends.

Where to find job opportunities In Canada?

What can you do when you have to find a job fast? It’s not easy, but there are steps you can take to expedite your job search.

Job opportunities can be found anywhere from a Help Wanted ad placed in a store window, to ads online or in Canada’s major newspaper, to major employers who hire “head-hunters” to find a new company official. Job fairs Increasingly, employers are working with Canada wide or Provincial Labour and Immigration and some employment service providers to hold “job fairs.” Immigrants are invited to meet employers. To know what job fairs are happening, regularly check the newspaper section Events.

Monster or Workpolis are free website that shows you what jobs are available daily in Canadian Provinces by Industry. It also gives detailed information including qualification and language requirements. Workopolis.com is the job website most Canada wide employers use to advertise job openings not all but is something.

Recruiters Some companies – particularly those with IT, office or accounting needs – hire a staffing, or placement, agency to find employees. These agencies advertise positions or seek out people whose skills meet the needs of employers. You should contact these employment agencies and have them add your name and work experience to their database. They CANNOT charge you any fee.

‘Hidden’ job market

It is said that most Canadian employers do not advertise when they have job openings. That is why we refer to the “hidden” job market.

To find opportunities you must “network.” That means doing things such as talking to people you know to find out who is hiring, contacting employers directly, attending job fairs, contacting groups involved in your field of work. ‘

Networking’

Networking means making social contacts. This way you can hear about unadvertised jobs, and employers can hear about you. Here are some methods: Get to know people in your neighbourhood and in your industry or profession. Talk to employment and professional counsellors, employers, and colleagues. By talking to people you will also come to understand your industry and what businesses look for in new employees. Join professional associations. Subscribe to their newsletters. Attend professional events and meetings. Attend public meetings and community events. Give and collect business cards. Contact Canadian employers directly, use HM Major Employment Companies Directory is a content website that lists all employers in the province,what they do and their contact informacion.

The Job Interview

Employers place a lot of importance on meeting a prospective employee. An interview could be an informal conversation or it could be a structured format with pre-determined questions in front of a panel of interviewers. The employer reviews paper applications. The next step is to call some candidates in for an interview. This could happen quickly or it make take a company weeks to decide who to interview. Be prepared to listen, answer and ask — in English. Have a positive attitude about yourself. Know that your skills and personal qualities would be an asset to the employer. The best way to learn about interviews is by taking advantage of advice offered by immigrant employment service agencies.

Regional resource for job seekers

Ontario, Manitoba, Vancouver , Calgary and Montreal , etc all Canada have many employment offices across the province. Free services include career counselling, information about job openings and the use of computers for resumé writing and Internet job search. Also, they can give information about government employment assistance programs. If you are an immigrant who lives in rural area you are advised to go to Employment of that Province.

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