Posts Tagged ‘ immigrant entrepreneurship ’

Int’l Student Employment Options-Canada

International students who come to Canada must have enough money to live and pay their bills while they are studying, without needing to work. However, in some situations, students may be able to work while they are studying. Working will give them experience in Canadian work settings; help them get to know the communities they’re living in; and let them earn extra money.

Students must not work without permission. If they do, they may be asked to leave Canada. They will also need a social insurance number to work in Canada. 

Canada’s MBA programs are trying to attract the world’s top students—and keep them here as residents after they graduate. As of 2008, and we are in 2012 all students who complete a two-year Master’s degree automatically have the right to stay in the country and work for three years. They do not need to have a job lined up and are not restricted to working in a particular field.  80 per cent of foreign MBAs at the school choose to stay and work in Canada immediately after their MBAs.

 We advise international students who plan to work in Canada to stay and work for a Summer , or find Summer employment at home in their field of study. Otherwise, she said it could take longer to find a career after graduation.

 International students who come to Canada must have enough money to live and pay their bills while they are studying, without needing to work. However, in some situations, students may be able to work while they are studying. Working will give them experience in Canadian work settings; help them get to know the communities they’re living in; and let them earn extra money.

Students must not work without permission. If they do, they may be asked to leave Canada. They will also need a social insurance number to work in Canada.

If you are interested in working in Ontario or B.C. for instance in Canada, the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation’s labour market section provides career resources for students and skilled immigrants, and career trends in Canada. The Province also provides comprehensive information about skilled immigrants and working in B.C. on the International Qualifications website

 

Resources

Students with a Job Offer – Ontario Immigration

BC On Jobs Plan

Playing the visa card Article

Marisol Diaz is  Business developer and author specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful career opportunities for local and international trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting career opportunity in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, training and Workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products

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Secrets of Successful Immigrants In Canada

Immigrants are good for Canadian economy. The most skilled create jobs in technology and engineering. 2009 immigrant-founded engineering and tech companies employed more than 150,000 people and generated $25 billion in sales. Immigrants contribute to the economic growth of their host countries in many ways, bringing new skills and competencies with them and helping to reduce labour shortages.

Immigrant entrepreneurship has gone beyond traditional ethnic businesses, into a wide range of sectors and innovative areas.   Is there a market here for skilled labour? Actually, Canada is seeing signs of worker shortages in several professions – including engineers, doctors and nurses, to name a few. Added to this is the fact that the population in some provinces is shrinking, and employers are having difficulty filling their rosters with skilled help. Paul Darby, director of the Conference Board of Canada, estimates a shortfall of 3 million skilled workers by the year 2020.

Get in the wagon of  Entreprenuership and Employment Creation of  Immigrants.

The Canadian government issues immigrant visas to business immigrants who qualify under the Business Immigration program.  There are three categories of business immigrants: Entrepreneurs, Investors and Self-Employed persons.  Each program has its own criteria for selection, and require Business Experience as defined in the immigration regulations.     An Entrepreneur must have a minimum of two years of business management and ownership of a percentage of equity in a business within the past 5 years.  The business must meet certain specified criteria that relate to the number of employees, the total annual revenue, net income and net assets.  The entrepreneur must also demonstrate a personal net worth of at least $300,000 CAD.  If the applicant meets these criteria, then he or she will be issued an immigrant visa and become a permanent resident subject to the condition that he or she starts or purchases a business that meets certain minimum requirements for any one year period within the first 3 years of becoming a permanent resident.  If the conditions are met then they are lifted, if they are not met then the immigration department may take steps to attempt to remove the permanent residence status.

An Investor must have a minimum personal net worth of at least $1,600,000 CAD that has been legally obtained, and meet the specified criteria regarding past business ownership or management.  If these criteria are met, then he or she must invest $800,000 in a government guaranteed investor fund for a five year period.  During those 5 years there is no interest paid on this money, but the return of the principal to the applicant is guaranteed by the government.  Financing is available for the investment amount.  There are no conditions attached to the permanent residence status of an investor.

The Self-Employed category requires an ability to be self-employed in Canada in the field of cultural activities, athletics or the purchase and management of a farm.  The applicant must have experience in one of these areas and if successful, will be issued an immigrant visa that is not subject to any terms and conditions.

It is important to be represented by a competent, experienced lawyer in filing a business immigrant application, to ensure the greatest chance of success with a minimal amount of delay in the processing.    For further information and a free assessment, please contact us at

Marisol Diaz is  Business developer and author specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful career opportunities for local and international trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting career opportunities in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, seminars and Workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products

Find Recent Jobs. Jobs in Canada

Get off to a great start and succeed in Canada

It’s brutal out there. But the people getting hired aren’t necessarily the most connected – they’re the most creative.  How do you gett of a great start and succed in Canada? Well start by your resume. Did you know the average manager spends less than one minute reviewing your resume? What can you do to get your resume to stand out from the crowd? In our  weekly’s post and content site Marisol Diaz shares some simple tips that you and anybody else can use to strengthen your professional packaging to come live and work in Canada. 

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  • Find opportunities to work the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, Canada. Job listings, qualifications info, and application links.

 
About Hineni Media

Our company mission is two-fold: to create an objective knowledge-base for the publishing and content creation industry and to provide job-lead information, migration and cross cultural services for all who are looking forward to live, study, and work in Canada.

For other resources and workshops aimed at  career reinvention, portable  jobs and  business,  contact  the Reinvention consultancy  Division  here

Immigrants: Starting a business in Canada

The Immigrant Entrepreneur Visa Category is intended for prospective immigrants who propose to establish a new business or who propose to purchase all or part of an existing business that has supportable prospects for expansion in any province in Canada

 The Canadian goverment  is also ramping up our support for immigrant entrepreneurs, those  who’ve long been a tremendous source of innovation in  Canada.  Immigrants are twice as likely as native-born  Canadian to start companies – although a greater proportion also struggle to keep their businesses open for longer than a year.  That’s why  the Canadian goverment has been creating  a new competition that challenges community-based organizations to come up with programs that can help immigrant businesses across the city grow to scale.  At the same time,  in many provinces the Canadian goverment is has been offering some of  its  business courses and programs  in Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Russian – which will allow us to connect to hundreds of new businesses in our immigrant communities. Read here  about  a Business Immigrant Mentorship Program

 There are four types of entrepreneurs who contribute substantially to economic development and job creation in Canada.

The categories are not mutually exclusive as some business characteristics can be found across these typologies but they do have distinct characteristics.

  • Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses
  • Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators.
  • Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
  • Immigrant Transnational Businesses

1. Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses:  These are low-to-moderate-income (LMI) businesses, largely retail and personal services. They start small and frequently stay small and usually locate their businesses in economically distressed areas with lower rents. .eg. http://tortillerialamexicana.ca/

This group has special challenges that include limited English; low familiarity with Canadian cultural and business practices; little or no credit history and little or no business and/or management education.

 The businesses are alternatives to wage employment and involve extremely long hours and hard work. Employees are more often than not other family members. The goal of the business owners, often called “Necessity Entrepreneurs”, is to make a life for themselves, their families and to ensure their children’s future. They usually do not expect to pass on the business to their children and frequently note that they are working extraordinarily hard so their children can get an education and not have to work as hard. However, some of these business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

2. Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators

These entrepreneurs apply their scientific education and expertise to the creation of a product or service in technology or medical drugs/treatments. The goal of the business owner is often, but not always, to develop the technology and have it acquired by a larger company clearing the way for creating new products and services.

3. Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
These are businesses in real estate, manufacturing, retail, wholesale, transportation, construction, leisure and hospitality, etc. They are the core businesses that drive the province, regional and national economies and become important employers in their community and province.

These businesses are credited with revitalizing economically depressed neighborhoods and communities. These business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

4. Immigrant Transnational Businesses

These businesses are a new phenomenon of “Keeping Feet in Both Worlds”. Immigrant transnationalism refers to the regular engagement in economic, political and socio-cultural activities spanning national borders.

These transnational entrepreneurs are playing an important role in facilitating international trade, investment and “diaspora tourism”. They are a heterogeneous group coming from many countries, crossing ethnic, immigrant and minority boundaries possessing different motivations and experiences.  Now within it , there are four distinct types of immigrant transnational enterprises: Circuit firms involved in the transfer of goods and remittances across countries; Cultural enterprises that rely on their daily contacts with the home country and depend on the desire of immigrants for cultural goods in Canada such as shows, CDs and newspapers; Ethnic enterprises that are small retail firms catering to the immigrant community, which depends on a steady supply of imported goods; Return migrant enterprises that are businesses established by returnees that rely on their contacts in Canada.

Start a business in Canada ! , Your opportunity is now businesses, create jobs for their community and wealth for their families. That’s why they are often called “Opportunity Entrepreneurs”.

 Learn how we can support you and help you make your business flourish. If you are exploring entrepreneurship, our orientation workshops are the perfect place to start. Begin your entrepreneurial journey with Hineni Media and the workshops, multi-week classes, and events. We offer for women and men at every stage of the entrepreneurial cycle.

This fall, connect with the resources you need to start your business or bring your existing business to new heights, and discover why Hineni Media is the place where success grows.

Onward and upward,

Marisol Diaz

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

International Profesionals in Canada: 10 high-paying jobs that don’t require a degree

International Profesionals in Canada: 10 high-paying jobs that don’t require a degree 

In a lot of ways, college is a great idea, for personal well-being, society, and of course, your career. But going to college doesn’t necessarily mean that you will make more money than if you hadn’t. There are many reasons why people skip college. Maybe it will save money, or maybe you think the business of higher education is a self-made fortune or scheme.

Either way, careers abound that allow you to make money without a degree. Lots of people who have these jobs also have a degree and working these jobs doesn’t mean one must forfeit college altogether, but you can line you pockets while working around the system.

Canada Employer’s database has a list of well-paying jobs you can skip college for, researched and based on statistics at http://www.jobfutures.org/ , but we’ve added a few of our own. By the way: Bounty hunters can earn up to $138,000 a year, tree trimmers average $32,090, makeup artists can average $45,000, and truck drivers can make $66,000. College is great, but isn’t for everyone. Plus, even $32K is pretty darn good when exactly none of that money has to be sacrificed for student loan debt!

1. Nuclear Power Reactor Operator: $79,100

This job requires highly-specialized skills such as understanding aspects of engineering, physics and troubleshooting. So if you are disciplined and capable enough to learn math and science outside the classroom, $79K a year certainly makes this worth looking into. The title is enough to impress even the most thoughtful of highbrow linguists. Of course, the world’s best-know holder of that title is Homer Simpson.

2. Landscape Architect: $65, 910

Although in 49 states a landscape architect is required to have a license, you don’t need to go to a four-year college to become one. Another lucrative option in this field involves freelance architecture. Either way, you get to drop mad knowledge about horticulture and exercise your artistic muscles while you get messy in the garden and make some good, hard cash.

3. Director of Security: $62,400

This role is often referred to as the Chief Security Officer (CSO), and it means exactly what it sounds like: the CSO is responsible for an organization’s entire security posture, both the physical aspect and operating the digital system. You get there by first being an assistant and then working your way up to Director of Security. Much better than being a bouncer, eh?

4. Air Traffic Controller (pictured): $60,200

Even though you don’t need a degree to work as an Air Traffic Controller, it’s a highly competitive field. Air Traffic Controllers coordinate the movement of aircraft in the air and at airports to prevent accidents and minimize delays, using radar and visual observation. Applicants must pass rigorous physical examinations, background checks, drug screening, and some may also be required to take aptitude tests. Stress levels are high, but so is the pay.

5. Elevator Mechanic: $61, 500

 It doesn’t require a degree, but you do need to obtain a license. Successful elevator mechanics generally understand complex mechanical systems and follow safety standards. Elevator mechanics may also need to work odd hours, for example, to fix a broken elevator before the morning rush at an office building.

6. Private Detective or Investigator: $50,600

Critical-thinking, an understanding of the law and psychology are useful for anyone wanting to become a private detective. While watching endless episodes of “Law & Order” might not be enough preparation, social situations where you listen and read body language do give you good experience. Other responsibilities may include analyzing data, researching databases, questioning suspects or taking the stand at a hearing.

7. Freelance Photographer: $47,800

As any freelancer knows, being successfully self-employed requires discipline and a critical understanding of business practices. It also helps to be a skilled photographer, so don’t go thinking just anyone can start their own photography company. I also know a variety of people who make a living with freelance video production. Think about all the possibilities you can start out with– weddings, bat and bar mitzvahs, music videos, live performances — you name it.

8. Fishing Supervisor: $43,720

Atlantic Canada: Fishing boats, canaries, factory trawlers, floating processors — these may be a dangerous jobs, but you can walk away with a boat load of money, and you likely only have to work one season on the year. To become a supervisor, you’re likely to work as an assistant or crew member first, before being promoted.

9. Personal Trainer: $37,500

Many personal trainers have degrees or specialized certification in the field, although not necessarily a four year degree. It is, however, important to have an understanding of anatomy, nutrition, and first aid for safety reasons and to keep your clients well-informed. Similar to any entrepreneur, time-management and customer service skills are useful in this field. Physical stamina and a healthy lifestyle are also highly recommended.

10. Bus Driver: $35, 990

Inner-city bus drivers or train operators make a good amount of dough, and they are just required to get a license to do it. School bus drivers, on average, make a little less, but cash in at an annual mean of $28,050. Bus drivers have an important job, as they are responsible for safely transporting passenger to and from their destination. That means, to be a bus driver, you have to be alert at all times and have a keen eye for traffic and weather conditions.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

Setting Up Shop – Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Ontario, Canada

Setting Up Shop – Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Toronto City
Most everyday Torontonians  depend of immigrant business for the services and goods they consume. they are the shopkeepers and street vendors, that keep the city humming, but these entrepreneurs face many challanges including language barriers , limitted acces to financing, and a lack of understanding of the rules of doing business in Toronto City and mostly Canada in general . Check their stories and hear what the experts  have to say about what can be done to helpe these business thrive.

International Professionals in Canada: find a temporary job

Do you want to work on a temporary basis in Canada? There are many temporary positions available in various sectors. Companies usually hire out specific small-term projects as temporary positions.  Agency-placed temporary jobs are a growing haven for laid-off professionals and those in skilled trades. 

And with companies cutting millions of full-time jobs this year, staffing industry experts say they’re fielding more and more applications from local and national and international  seasoned workers . Researching companies  is a great way to find temporary jobs in Canada. Here’s tips for finding and keeping the bests Canadian temporary jobs.

1. Target the right firms . Start with a detailed list of companies in the field you are interested and province, check   Canada Employer’s database for Int’l Prfessionals. 

2.  Register with multiple staffing  agencies. Start with a detailed list of companies and staffing firms in your area, check the Canadian Staffing Association’s directory.  It’s not taboo to be working with several placement firms. “It’s understood that (it) happens. Like applying for any job, you circulate your credentials and hope for an assignment.   Many services operate Web sites with helpful career information and links to other resources in addition to online application materials and job postings. Here’s a couple of national and international staffing companies and their main specialties:

Accountemps
Locations: 360 worldwide
Specialties: financial, accounting, credit and collections
Web site:
www.accountemps.com

Aerotek
Locations: 150 worldwide
Specialties: engineering, aviation, scientific and architecture
Web site:
www.aerotek.com

Kelly Services
Locations: 2,000 nationwide
Specialties: professional services, law, health care, technical and administrative
Web site:
www.kellyservices.com

Manpower
Locations: 4,200 worldwide
Specialties: professional services, technical, finance, engineering and administrative
Web site:
www.manpower.com 

 3. Tweak your resume:  Write an Accomplishments-Based Resume. employers  want to know of specific skill sets, the details on projects you’ve manage with success.

4. Be clear and firm about your salary expectations.

5. Ever been told you’re underqualified? Or overqualified? here is the best approach:

Underqualified: in a persuavie way say: “I’m very interested in working for you and your company, and I’ll keep my eye on the website. Remember candidates should indicate that they will address whatever shortcomings they’re told about, she says. They have two choices: either come up with specifics that show the gap actually isn’t there, or propose a plan that would fill any gaps.

The overqualified should avoid telling the interviewer how the company should be run or let an overinflated self-image show. “I want to hear they’re very collaborative and not independent, and that it’s a team approach.” It’s important to “show your passion is for the work, not for being a director or leader.” Candidates should avoid arguin or  explanations like: “I just need a job for now”. Interviewers are looking for people willing to grow with the company, and such answers don’t show a long-term interest in the company or the position.

Overqualified: The best tactic: Agree that “you may be right” but add on “for this job.” The idea is for the candidate to position himself or herself as someone the organization can look to as it grows and needs more experienced people. “What you’re doing is trying to position yourself not just a s a solution for today but for tomorrow.  There’s also absolutely nothing wrong, he adds, with saying you’d be content to take a position that’s seen as below your qualifications. “The world needs movers and shakers but it also needs doers.” If true, a candidate may state clearly that he or she is not interested in moving up in an organization but “they’d be happy to mentor more junior people.”

 6. Once you’re on the job, don’t coast. Temporary jobs are more than a paycheck. They’re a foot in the door to a prospective full-time employer, a networking opportunity and a chance to learn new skills in a new business sector.
7. Take advantage of training. While agency clients expect a basic skill set from their temps, such as meeting work schedules and deadlines and taking instructions from supervisors, most offer some sort of training. You might get a chance to learn a new database, the latest accounting software or how to operate state-of-the-art machinery.

8. Take advantage of temp packages: (medical benefits, paid vacation, RSSP, savings plans, workers’ compensation coverage and other benefits.

9.  Identify and research the companies in your chosen sector.   Once you have decided which industry niche can offer you the career path you are looking for, spend time  researching specific  companies. If possible, find ways to meet and get an interview with individuals (human resource, hiring managers, etc )  from these companies. Interviews always seem to take the format of the employer asking the majority of the questions: this does not have to be the case. I recommend you to prepare at least ten questions before a meeting, and make sure that they are very relevant to the vacancy and your future. Some of your key questions should focus on the internal processes for progression; for example:
■What methods do you use to encourage internal promotions?
■What percentage of staff members have been promoted in the last 12 months?
■Do you have a career development programme in place?
■How does it work?
■How often do appraisals take place?
■How is the information used?
■What is the annual training budget per person

10. Never make a career choice based on money. I know this may sound crazy but choosing your first job or changing your job for money usually only offers short-term benefit.

11. Always try to achieve a sensible work-life balance:  I’d be inclined to look for a new position in a company that recognises the considerable benefits of a healthy balance between work and your life away from work.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

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