Posts Tagged ‘ Get certified as an international professional ’

International Professionals in Canada: find a temporary job

Do you want to work on a temporary basis in Canada? There are many temporary positions available in various sectors. Companies usually hire out specific small-term projects as temporary positions.  Agency-placed temporary jobs are a growing haven for laid-off professionals and those in skilled trades. 

And with companies cutting millions of full-time jobs this year, staffing industry experts say they’re fielding more and more applications from local and national and international  seasoned workers . Researching companies  is a great way to find temporary jobs in Canada. Here’s tips for finding and keeping the bests Canadian temporary jobs.

1. Target the right firms . Start with a detailed list of companies in the field you are interested and province, check   Canada Employer’s database for Int’l Prfessionals. 

2.  Register with multiple staffing  agencies. Start with a detailed list of companies and staffing firms in your area, check the Canadian Staffing Association’s directory.  It’s not taboo to be working with several placement firms. “It’s understood that (it) happens. Like applying for any job, you circulate your credentials and hope for an assignment.   Many services operate Web sites with helpful career information and links to other resources in addition to online application materials and job postings. Here’s a couple of national and international staffing companies and their main specialties:

Accountemps
Locations: 360 worldwide
Specialties: financial, accounting, credit and collections
Web site:
www.accountemps.com

Aerotek
Locations: 150 worldwide
Specialties: engineering, aviation, scientific and architecture
Web site:
www.aerotek.com

Kelly Services
Locations: 2,000 nationwide
Specialties: professional services, law, health care, technical and administrative
Web site:
www.kellyservices.com

Manpower
Locations: 4,200 worldwide
Specialties: professional services, technical, finance, engineering and administrative
Web site:
www.manpower.com 

 3. Tweak your resume:  Write an Accomplishments-Based Resume. employers  want to know of specific skill sets, the details on projects you’ve manage with success.

4. Be clear and firm about your salary expectations.

5. Ever been told you’re underqualified? Or overqualified? here is the best approach:

Underqualified: in a persuavie way say: “I’m very interested in working for you and your company, and I’ll keep my eye on the website. Remember candidates should indicate that they will address whatever shortcomings they’re told about, she says. They have two choices: either come up with specifics that show the gap actually isn’t there, or propose a plan that would fill any gaps.

The overqualified should avoid telling the interviewer how the company should be run or let an overinflated self-image show. “I want to hear they’re very collaborative and not independent, and that it’s a team approach.” It’s important to “show your passion is for the work, not for being a director or leader.” Candidates should avoid arguin or  explanations like: “I just need a job for now”. Interviewers are looking for people willing to grow with the company, and such answers don’t show a long-term interest in the company or the position.

Overqualified: The best tactic: Agree that “you may be right” but add on “for this job.” The idea is for the candidate to position himself or herself as someone the organization can look to as it grows and needs more experienced people. “What you’re doing is trying to position yourself not just a s a solution for today but for tomorrow.  There’s also absolutely nothing wrong, he adds, with saying you’d be content to take a position that’s seen as below your qualifications. “The world needs movers and shakers but it also needs doers.” If true, a candidate may state clearly that he or she is not interested in moving up in an organization but “they’d be happy to mentor more junior people.”

 6. Once you’re on the job, don’t coast. Temporary jobs are more than a paycheck. They’re a foot in the door to a prospective full-time employer, a networking opportunity and a chance to learn new skills in a new business sector.
7. Take advantage of training. While agency clients expect a basic skill set from their temps, such as meeting work schedules and deadlines and taking instructions from supervisors, most offer some sort of training. You might get a chance to learn a new database, the latest accounting software or how to operate state-of-the-art machinery.

8. Take advantage of temp packages: (medical benefits, paid vacation, RSSP, savings plans, workers’ compensation coverage and other benefits.

9.  Identify and research the companies in your chosen sector.   Once you have decided which industry niche can offer you the career path you are looking for, spend time  researching specific  companies. If possible, find ways to meet and get an interview with individuals (human resource, hiring managers, etc )  from these companies. Interviews always seem to take the format of the employer asking the majority of the questions: this does not have to be the case. I recommend you to prepare at least ten questions before a meeting, and make sure that they are very relevant to the vacancy and your future. Some of your key questions should focus on the internal processes for progression; for example:
■What methods do you use to encourage internal promotions?
■What percentage of staff members have been promoted in the last 12 months?
■Do you have a career development programme in place?
■How does it work?
■How often do appraisals take place?
■How is the information used?
■What is the annual training budget per person

10. Never make a career choice based on money. I know this may sound crazy but choosing your first job or changing your job for money usually only offers short-term benefit.

11. Always try to achieve a sensible work-life balance:  I’d be inclined to look for a new position in a company that recognises the considerable benefits of a healthy balance between work and your life away from work.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

Canada: Sample arrange employment offer letters

A job offer letter is the minimum promise protection you should have in any work opportunity requiring you to resign your current job or to relocate out of your place of residence. A job offer letter is a condensed pre-employment contract outlining the basics of your employment. In small companies a job offer letter may be written without a lawyer’s help.

A written agreement also benefits an employer because you as an employee agree to provide specific work benefits and make certain promises (like not revealing company secrets or stealing company customers). Employment relationships are increasingly contract-oriented for professional, managerial, technical, and administrative positions.

Arranged Employment is possible when a Canadian employer extends an offer of full-time permanent employment in Canada* to a foreign skilled worker.  The foreign skilled worker’s Canadian Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa will be expedited so that the worker can come to Canada and start working for the Canadian employer quickly.

Arranged Employment is one of ways to qualify for a Canada Permanent Resident Visa through the Federal Skilled Worker category of immigration.

If an Employer is being paid money to offer employment, it is obviously not a genuine offer. Anyone participating in such a scheme is involved in a fraudulent practice.

Moreover, HRDC is now starting to question employers closely about the relationship between the employer and the employee and the motivation for offering the job on an indeterminate basis. Similarly, at the visa interview, the visa officer will closely question the applicant in similar terms. The applicant must also satisfy the officer that he or she is capable of performing the job and likely to accept the job upon arrival in Canada.

I always advise  foreign  job-seekers to get job offers in writing if employers don’t offer any form of contract. If an employer seems unwilling, one way around the issue is to write an acceptance letter of the job offer in which you spell out what you understand to be the conditions of employment.

For a position such as sales or marketing  where there are various salary issues, including commission levels, it is extremely important to get the specifics in writing.

Click here for a sample

Coming to Canada as Business Immigrant

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Coming to Canada as a Business Immigrant

If you already run a business  the Business Immigration Program seeks to attract experienced business people to Canada who will support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy…. but  the old adage goes: failure to plan is a plan for failure.  Whether you are building a business from scratch or buying a business, you should not skip this important step … even if it means that you just jot your ideas down on scraps of paper or a napkin!

Business immigrants are expected to make a C$400,000 investment or to own and manage businesses in Canada.
Canada has three classes of business immigrants:

•investors
•entrepreneurs and
•self-employed persons.

Each application can be made for only one class and cannot be changed once the application is submitted. The criteria you must meet to qualify are different for each class.

Business Immigrant. Entrepreneuer Subclass.  Developing your business project

When applying for immigration to Canada, entrepreneur applicants must submit a business project that will be the key factor in the assessment of their application. Remember you will summiting this project as part of your  permanent worker or businesspeople immigration paperwork.

This project is the first step towards implementing the business plan itself. Experience shows that the rigour demanded when developing your business plan will help you identify all the challenges facing your project.

In general, the business plan contains all the information about your target clientele, competitors and suppliers. It includes a market study, a marketing strategy and budget forecasts.

Need help developing your business plan? Check below our  useful links

Going into business or acquiring a business

Once in Canada, you will have to undertake a number of steps to start up your business or acquire a business. This will be much easier if you made contacts during for instance a first exploratory trip. Otherwise, don’t hesitate to contact the various resource persons who provide you with the support needed to start your business. They can guide you in your first steps and save you a great deal of time.

3 steps to take as soon as you arrive

The many different steps you’ll take will depend on the type of business you want to establish. You’ll have to contact competent persons to make your start-up easier. To guide you, here are three steps you should take as soon as you arrive:

  • Obtaining support for your start-up.
  • Completing the formalities for starting up a business.
  • Seeking out business opportunities.

SELF EMPLOYMENT SUBCLASS.  Create your own job

If you have some capital, perhaps you are planning to create your own job, start your own company or become a partner in an existing company.

To be successful, this generally requires a good understanding of the Candian business milieu and a business plan based on an extensive market study. If this option interests you, there are many resources available to help you achieve your goals.

Find out if the profession or trade you plan to practice as a self-employed worker is governed by a regulatory body. If so, you must fulfill the organization’s requirements.

There is a network of public services across all of Canada ’s regions for individuals seeking self-employment or who want to be entrepreneurs in Canada. Visit the useful links recommended here.

 INVESTOR IMMIGRANTS. SUBSCLASS

Investors currently have to demonstrate that they have at least three years of management experience acquired in the 10 years preceding their application in a farming, commercial or industrial business that is profitable and legal, or for a government or one of its departments or agencies or for an international agency.

Management experience is defined as the actual assuming on a full-time basis of responsibilities and duties related to the planning, management and control of financial resources and of human or material resources. 

Under the amendments : (including Quebec)

•Investors will need to have at least two years of management experience acquired in the five years preceding their application. This experience no longer has to be acquired in a profitable business, which will simplify application processing procedures.
•The level of management experience required will be more flexible in order to broaden the pool of managers eligible for the program.•Management experience will no longer have to have been acquired on a full-time basis and experience acquired in a professional business will be eligible to enable the selection of applicants who practise both management functions and a professional activity. In this case, the professional business should have at least the equivalent of two full-time staff (30 or more hours per week), excluding the candidate. Calculation of net assets
Investor immigrants are required to have net assets of $800,000. Under the present Regulation, these assets must have been accumulated through legal economic activities and may include the value of the equity of the accompanying spouse, if that equity belongs to the foreign national and is invested in an enterprise in which the investor also controls the equity and has acquired experience in management.

Under the amendments :

•Net assets may include donations and inheritances held by the applicant as well as all the assets of his or her spouse, which would broaden the pool of applicants eligible for the program. However, donations received less than six months prior to the filing of the application will not be accepted.
Selection based on applicant’s record
Currently, all investors are required to attend a selection interview. 

Under the amendments :

•Selection may be based on the applicant’s record, which would allow for more flexibility in administering the program.
 

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Start Your Own Successful Online Business   for details.

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, bilingual information designer, info-Preneuer;  career and  a business facilitator . She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

How to Immigrate to Canada Through Employment

There are a limited number of ways to immigrate to Canada. The most common way is still through a family category( getting married or being spouse of someone that applied and is resident or a citizen) . The second most common way is through employment.  ( company transfer, job offer or work internship)

One of the most recent common paths to residency that does not involve immigrating through a family member is from student to TW (temporay work)  to SKV (skill worker visa)  to permanent resident. It is important to understand that employment based permanent residency is for a job in the future. In other words, this is a prospective position. This means that there are cases where an employee may work for other employers while a different employer petitions for their residency.

Different Employment Categories

There are a variety of different employment categories under which a person may seek residency. Briefly they include:

1st: Priority workers – Aliens with extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business or athletics; outstanding professors and researchers; multinational executives and managers.

2nd: Members of professions holding advanced degrees or aliens of exceptional ability.

3rd: Professionals, skilled, and other workers.

4th: Special immigrants.

By far the most common categories utilized by intending immigrants are the second and third preference categories. With limited exceptions the employer will have to test the Canadian job market to show Canada Human Resources that there are no qualified Canadian workers available for the position in the geographic area of employment.  Most  Canadian citizens or lawful permanent resident are authorized to work. Individuals on non-immigrant visas are not considered “Canadian workers” for the purposes of the test of Canada Human Resources or the labor market.

The employer will have to run ads in a variety of media such as newspapers, journals, internet job sites, state job banks, etc. These ads have a limited shelf life and, assuming that no qualified Canadian worker comes forward, the employer will have to file a request for job offer with Human Resources in under consecutive or at least 180 days from the date the first ad was placed or the employer will have to run the ad again if it is needed to satisfy their burden under the law.

Once AEO is filed Human Resources  will certify the case, deny the case, or audit the case to make sure that all the appropriate steps were followed.

Assuming the case is verified and certified the employee can begin the immigrant visa process with Canada Immigration Services. This is where the category of employment is important. The availability of visas for each category fluctuates and  Canada Immigration must be reviewed to determine the appropriate path for the next step.

Marisol Diaz has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006.

NOTE: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Which employers are willing to help your through Immigration Canada.

In order to work in Canada, a foreign or skill worker needs a work permit. In order to get a work permit a foreign worker or foreign trained professional needs a job offer.   That is your ‘door’ or one of first steps to immigrate to Canada through employment.  What employers or companies are  willing to help you with it?  who or which companies are ready to comply with the law?

First of all,   as editor-in chief of an ePublishing firm I’ll tackle  the question of  who are the employers willing to help through immigration Canada?  Something I got all the time as there are many Canadian companies already working on the issue but  how much is the foreign reader  willing to pay for such  compilation?

Secondly, I’ll answer the question  about  if we are an employmente agency:  no. We are not an employment agency and are not licensed or authorized to find jobs for candidates we are niche publishers. Secondly, if we did so, we’d probably be creating conflict of interest situations. But while our firm can’t find you a job, we CAN give you some good advice:

There ARE such things as “International Trained Professional friendly” companies. We were running such database for years. These can be anything from a giant corporation which routinely is forced to hire foreign talent to a small company which has filed a successful employment-visa in the past in the name of a really great employee and, with the experience demystified and a positive situation, is willing to do so again. As with all employment, SUPPLY and DEMAND is the key issue in your ability to find such company/or  employer. For example, if you are a Computer Programmer with expertise in a hot new programming language, you’ll have companies fighting over you. If you are a recent grad with degree in marketing, then you better be prepared to show prospective employers why you are worth the effort.

In companies which hight hire foreign workers’s volume, the legal fees for thevisa filing are usually paid for by the employer. While there is no prohibition that the employee pay legal and filing fees, there are  others that MUST be paid by the employer. In smaller companies, WHO pays the lawyer fee is a matter of negotiation, again, based on supply and demand. If you are cutting your own deal because you are in high demand, the workers visa processing is usually a part of it. If not, the employer may be willing to sign the papers but not pay. They MUST, ALWAYS, pay the workers visa fee.

So how do you get a job? Well, let’s divide you into three categories:

TEMPORARY PROFESSIONALS ALREADY HERE WISHING TO CHANGE EMPLOYERS:

As you probably know, getting an workers visa transferred is usually less painful than that first work visa approval. If you are in valid work status, recruit aggressively and fire out resumes. If competition for the job is tough, you may want to add in the cover letter that you will be responsible for handling all of the costs associated with the transfer of your work visa, and save in fees explanation for later, in person.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS PLANNING FOR GRADUATION:

You will encounter MANY immigration lawyers who tell you that it’s “safer” to get your work permit as soon as possible and that practical training can be cut short. Don’t buy it. Unless you are graduating with a highly coveted degree and you KNOW you are in great demand, the Post Completion Practical Training can be an INVALUABLE tool. Here’s why: when you start a new job and the employer doesn’t know you, they are right to be concerned about investing the time and the money in getting you an work permit. By starting with them in practical training- which requires NOTHING on their part- and proven your worth to them- you set up a situation where the transfer to work permit status a year later is a piece of cake if you don’t have or gained an internship while at school. I have had dozens of inquiries follow this advice successfully…six months into the practical training, I get a call from the client and after 5 mellow minutes explaining what we need to do in six months, the employer is happy and ready to commit to the work permit. Besides, if you DON’T use the year of practical training or internship, you are wasting a year of work permit status!

NOTE: there are some limited situations where it DOES make sense to cut your internship or practical training short in exchange for an work permit. As we have explained in the past,  internship status is an extension of the student visa, which requires continuing nonimmigrant intent. Conversely, the work permit does NOT require proof of nonimmigrant intent. Consider the following situation:

EXAMPLE: You graduate and start practical training. Your girlfriend, a lawful permanent resident, and you decide to get married. You do so and she files an immigrant petition on your behalf, but it will take a few years for the priority date to become current. If you remain in the international student internship status and travel during that year after graduation, you risk getting stuck abroad! By filing your petition, you have demonstrated that you intend to immigrate. In doing so, you are deniable at entry as  student visa  if you travel abroad…so if you ARE going to travel that first year, you’d better switch to work permit and get stamped while abroad with a new international student stamp in your passport.

PROFESSIONALS ABROAD LOOKING TO WORK IN CANADA FOR THE FIRST TIME

I imagine that we have many of these among our readers, as this question appears in e-mail all the time. Here’s the best advice I can give you about finding an Immigration-based visa position in Canada.

Rely almost exclusively on the Internet for your career search, especially if you are in a high-tech field.
If you have any friends or family in Canada., ask them to help you in your job search.
NEVER, EVER pay a “finders fee” to a company purporting to place professionals. Except for megafirms, I have YET to see a SINGLE such situation which did not result in an absolute theft of money. The REAL employers don’t charge you because they need you if they are bothering to consider work permit visa applicants!

Don’t be shy about asking for company information, but don’t be obnoxious. I can’t begin to tell you how many calls I get from great employers expressing disbelief at the arrogance of some of the applicants, sitting overseas, “demanding” this and that. Without respect and common courtesy, forget it…Canadian employers understand an egalitarian system, and you should treat whomever you are communicating with- from the lowliest clerk to the CEO – with the same modesty and respect with which YOU would like to be treated.

Everybody and their brother is on the Internet. Before you go with the “exciting new upstart” (translation: we are new, enthusiastic, and have no history), spend HOURS researching them online. Dig deep for information and if it isn’t there, most likely they are not there either…

If they ask you for original documents- degrees, passports, etc.- tell them you understand that if you provide them with certified copies that will suffice. If they say that they must have originals, I can almost guarantee you that you are dealing with a disreputable company. It’s a lie.
If they tell you that “the case is pending”, then they should have, within a couple of weeks of filing, a receipt from the Canada Immigration. Adjudication may be slow, but the receipts are not.

So there you have it, folks. Best of luck in your Canada job hunt!

Marisol Diaz
Settlement & Integration Resources Publisher
Int’l Employment & Career Columnist

How to Get Professional Licensure, Accreditation, and Certification in Canada

Canadian Qualifications Recognition / Determining the Equivalency of your Foreign Degree

Recognition of foreign credentials is a challenge for all professions in Canada. There have been many articles in newspapers and magazines on how various professions and trades deal with credentials obtained outside Canada. Hineni Media’s office frequently receives calls from prospective employers, and from job seekers, asking about the equivalency of foreign credentials.

In Canada, professionals such as engineers, doctors, dentist, pharmacist, lawyers and teachers must be licensed to practice in their profession. It is illegal to hold oneself out to be a licensed professional without approval from the appropriate regulatory body.

Canada does not have a national system of institutional accreditation; rather, education falls within the jurisdiction of the provincial governments.

Each regulatory body assesses academic credentials and professional experience in order to determine whether a candidate meets the requirements for licensure. Some regulators have other requirements as well. For example, in addition to academic and experience requirements, the Professional Engineers of Ontario requires applicants to be Canadian citizens or permanent residents, be at least 18 years of age, be of good character and to have successfully completed a Professional Practice Exam.

We develop an Fast Track Individual Accreditation Help Plan and  Fact Sheets, where you gather the necessary documents and information, and we arrange for translation, complete application forms to initiate the application process, and pay the application fees on behalf of the applicant. In most cases, the application process can be expedited by developing the Accreditation Plan and applying for licensure before the applicant moves to Canada.

Why Accreditation?

Accreditation assures within and outside of Canada that the school’s programs are delivered by qualified faculty and are up-to-date. A degree or other credential from an accredited school or program can help make you more competitive on the job market.

Once You are in Canada

Foreign professional credential recognition in Canada is a territorial and provincial responsibility. However, the federal government has taken on a “facilitative role” in response to the difficulties migrants have faced in the past after migrating to Canada.

Newcomers to Canada can also turn to the Foreign Credentials Referral Office (FCRO), which helps internationally trained individuals find the information they need to get their credentials assessed and recognized more quickly. Established in 2007, the FCRO provides information, path-finding and referral services to help internationally trained individuals use their skills in Canada. There are now 320 Service Canada centres across the country offering in-person services to newcomers.
Contact us now for info-assistance with your application or Guide to Professional Accreditation

How to get a job in Canada

If your goal is to obtain a job offer with sponsorship for  work-visa, followed by permanent residency with a reputable company in your interested field, then here  are some career planning strategies that may help.

Canadian Employment Sponsorship now takes longer and a bit of paperwork., but each year Canada grants almost 90,000 work- visas.  According to  Canada immigration laws, international students with  visas are eligible to work full-time for one year after they graduate as part of their practical training. Upon completion of the practical training, international students must be sponsored by an employer to continue working in Canada.

 Employers must sponsor international students to obtain an work visa, which allows students to work in Canada for one to six additional years. International students planning to work fulltime after graduation in  Canada need to begin the job search process at least two semesters before graduation.

You will also need to become familiar with the Canadian job search process. The key to landing a job is diligence and developing an aggressive job search strategy to increase your chances of finding a good job in Canada. As it’s true that international students have some disadvantages when entering the job market.

Not mastering the official languages can be a serious obstacle. Social skills can also be a problem. A lack of relevant work experience while in school. These factors make it tough to compete in today’s job market. To increase your chances of finding a good job, consider the following advice.

• Improve your language skills. Hire a tutor or take an English or French course. Take advantage of a mock interview offered by the Career Center to develop effective interview and communication skills. Verbal and
written English or French  skills are essential to securing employment in Canada.

• Consider acquiring a major/specialization in demand that will increase chances of employment in  Canada.
According to Canada immigration , employment  petitions were approved in the following areas: Such fields include Systems Analysis and Programming (47.4%), Health (Medical)  and Electrical/Electronics Engineering (5.4%), College and University Education (4.1%), and Accountants and Related Finantial Occupations (3.7%)

 • Network at job fairs and recruiting events. Talk with a career counselor, faculty and friends. Develop networks and resources through local ethnic communities, nationality clubs, and classmates, business owners from your home country, your consulate, embassy, social organizations, advocacy groups, and professors from the same home country. Contact the alumni office to connect with alums from your homeland.

Join professional organizations and associations specific to the type of job you want or related to your field of interest. If you worked professionally in your homeland, network with the Canadian affiliate or a competitor of that organization. Search for global organizations desiring language skills, diversity, and knowledge of overseas economies. We offer an  available the Directory of Canadian business Operating in Foreign Countries. Networking is a great way to develop social skills.

Learn customary professional business and dining etiquette skills. Attend the Professional Etiquette Dinner hosted by the Career Center.

• If you are already in Canada check out the resources of a Career Center such as recruiting events, career fairs and employer information sessions held throughout the year. Meet with a career specialist. Participate in the Canadian Cultural Career Network Program.

• Sell yourself to the employer with an effective resume, cover letter and interviewing skills that
highlight what the employer is looking for. Make sure you know and emphasize your relevant strengths and skills in addition to your qualifications. Show how you can add value and benefit the organization. Develop marketable skills through part-time jobs, internships, graduate assistantships, student organizations and volunteer activities. Highlight those marketable skills on your resume and cover letter.

• Obtain an internship to gain experience in the field and a better understanding of your profession. Think about searching for companies from your homeland that have operations in Canada. Learn about Canadian companies where your peers have interviewed, interned or are working full-time. Consider an international internship. See the Study Abroad Coordinator in the Office of  International Studies and Programs. Meet with your departmental internship coordinator for opportunities. Check company websites. Check opportunities offered by other schools. Seek out companies that have a history of employment  sponsorship. Approximately 50% of interns receive a job offer from the sponsoring Canadian company after they complete an internship.

• Employment agencies provide permanent employment opportunities or staffing services offer temporary or contract placement as an option.

•  Some internet sites can be a valuable resource tool for job hunting. Consider local Canadian  jobs.

• Discussions about Employment  sponsorship should come later when the employer brings it up or when the applicant is offered employment. Uncover those companies that relate to your field of study and are of interest to you. It will be important to become very familiar with your industry, the companies within the industry, and positions available within those companies. Focus your job search on Canadian companies that prefer to hire international professionals. Search both small and large companies and compile a list of 50 Canadian  companies of interest. Studies have shown that about 80% of job openings are filled by employers without having a need to advertise their jobs. This is known as the “hidden job market.” Find a contact within the organization to
inquire and apply to jobs within the organization. The key is to have your resume with the hiring manager before a job is advertised.

Make appropriate follow-ups as needed to confirm your interest. These career planning strategies will help international students better prepare for the job search. After all, your priority is to obtain employment with sponsorship for  employment  followed by permanent residency with a reputable company in your interested field!

Canadian Government Job Sites

BC Government Job Postings
http://www.postings.gov.bc.ca/

Alberta Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.ab.ca/pao/jobs/

Saskatchewan Government Job Postings
http://www.careers.gov.sk.ca/

Manitoba Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.mb.ca/csc/

Ontario Government Job Postings
http://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/

Quebec Government Job Postings
http://www.tresor.gouv.qc.ca/resource/emplois.htm

 Nova Scotia Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.ns.ca/psc/services/employ/

New Brunswick Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.nb.ca/scripts/search/competition.idq?TextRestriction=&FMMod=-6m

Prince Edward Island Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.pe.ca/jobs/index.php3

Newfoundland & Labrador Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.nf.ca/psc/employment.htm

Federal Government Job Postings
http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/

 

Nongovernment Job Sites
+Canada Jobs
http://www.canada.plusjobs.com/

OPTION-carriere.ca
http://www.option-carriere.ca/

AboutJobs
http://aboutjobs.com/

“About.com” Job Searching
http://jobsearchtech.about.com/
careers/jobsearchtech/msub8.htm

Actijob/ActivEmploi
http://www.actijob.com/

All Canadian Jobs
http://www.allcanadianjobs.com/

Atlanticjobs.com
http://www.atlanticjobs.com/

BC WorkInfoNet
http://workinfonet.bc.ca/

British Columbia Hi Tech.
http://www.bctechnology.com/frameset_emp.html

Calgary Career Site
http://www.allstarjobs.ca

CallCareers.com Canada
http://www.callcareers.com/

Campus WorkLink
http://www.campusworklink.com/

Canada Online Job Search Guide
http://www.canadajobsearch.com/

CanadaIT.com
http://www.canadait.com/cfm/index.cfm

Canada Job Links
http://www.job-link.ca/

Canada Work Info Net
http://www.workinfonet.ca/

Canadian Career Page
http://www.canadiancareers.com/

Canadian Jobs
http://www.canadajobs.com/

Canadian Jobs : Canada Employment Weekly
http://www.mediacorp2.com/index.html

Career.com
http://www.career.com/

Careerclick.com
http://www.careerclick.com

CareerExchange
http://www.careerexchange.com/

CareerMosaic Canada
http://www.headhunter.net/jobseeker/
jobs/jobfindica.asp?ch=ICA

CareerTips
http://www.careertips.com/

Careertransit.com, Atlantic Canada’s Job Site
http://www.careertransit.com/

Career Edge
http://www.careeredge.on.ca/

Career Internetworking
http://www.careerkey.com/

Career Magazine
http://www.careermag.com/

Career Owl
http://www.careerowl.ca/

Career Studio
http://www.ola.bc.ca/careerstudio/

Charity Careeers
http://www.charitycareers.com/

CRS Major Canadian Companies, HR Departments
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
canjobs.html

CRS Career Channel
http://www.careermag.com/crs/

CRS Cities: HR Departments
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
cityjobs.html

Dice.com
http://www.dice.com/

Education Canada Network
http://www.educationcanada.com/

Employment Opportunities In The Space Industry
http://www.spacejobs.com/index.shtml

Environmental Jobs and Careers
http://www.ejobs.org/
 Financial Job Network
http://www.financialjobnet.com/

Forestry Employment Bulletin Board
http://www.canadian-forests.com/
job.html

Futurestep
http://www.futurestep.com/

Globecareers
www.globecareers.com

Hamilton-Wentworth Employer Directory
http://www.pichamilton.net/

Hotjobs.ca
http://www.hotjobs.ca/

“Human Resources Canada” Offices in CRS Cities
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
humanresourcescanada.html

Human Resources Development Canada
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/

“Job Bank” Human Resources Canada
http://jb-ge.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/

JobLink at Icdirect
http://www.icdirect.com/cgi-bin/getHTML.exe/www/0/0/jl?fhttpFile=/www/joblink.html

Jobs Canada
http://www.jobscanada.com/

Jobs in Canada with Jobrapido
http://www.job-rapido.ca/?q=canada

Jobs for Physicists and Engineers by PhysLINK.com
http://www.physlink.com/Community/JobBoard.cfm

JobFindCentral
http://www.jobfindcentral.com/

Jobs.ca
www.jobs.ca

Jobshark.ca
www.jobshark.ca

Mazemaster
http://www.mazemaster.on.ca/

MedHunters.com, Healthcare Jobs
http://www.medhunters.com/

Meta-list of On-Line Job-Search Resources and Services
http://www.job-hunt.org/index.html

Misconsult
http://www.misconsult.com/

Monster.ca, Career Center
http://www.monster.ca/

MultiMediator – Canada’s Multimedia Guide
http://www.multimediator.com/

National Association of Career Colleges
http://www.nacc.ca/

Nextsteps
http://www.nextsteps.org/

Positionwatch, IT Positions
http://www.positionwatch.com/

Quinte Region (ON), Job Resources
http://www.quinte.on.ca/sites/employ.htm

Resort Jobs Database – Canada
http://www.resortjobs.com/do/where/jobtree/Canada/

Seasonal Employment.com
http://www.seasonalemployment.com/canada.html

Student Employment Network
http://www.studentjobs.com/

Summer Jobs – Canada
http://www.summerjobs.com/do/where/jobtree/Canada/

Thingamajob
http://www.thingamajob.com/

Tiger Jobs
http://www.tigerjobs.com/rareas/

Toronto Computerwork.com
http://toronto.computerwork.com/

Vancouver insurance jobs
http://www.insuranceheadhunters.com/

WITI
http://www.witi.com/index-c.shtml

Worksearch
http://www.worksearch.gc.ca/

Workopolis, Mega Job Site
http://www.workopolis.com/

Job Recruiting Companies
Accu-Staff,Windsor
http://www.accu-staff.com/

Aerotek
http://www.aerotek.com/

AES Recruitment Advertising
http://www.aescompany.com/

The Agricultural Labour Pool
http://www.agri-labourpool.com/

Ajilon Canada, IT Careers
http://www.ajilon.ca/index.jsp

Anderson Executive Recruitment
http://www.andersoncareers.com/

Angus Miles
http://www.angusmiles.com/

Anne Whitten Bilingual
http://www.annewhitten.com/

Antiphon
http://www.antiphon.co.uk/

Black Appointments
http://www.blackapp.co.uk/

Bradson Staffing Services
http://www.spherion.com/

BrainsTalent.com, Recruitment
Advertising Innovators
http://www.brainstalent.com/

Canadian Executive Recruitment
http://www.cdnexec.net/

Canadian Medical Placement Service.
http://www.cmps.ca/

Canadian Recruiters and Directory of Recruiters
http://www.directoryofrecruiters.com/

Career Edge
http://www.careeredge.org

CCT Inc.
http://www.cctinc.org/

CEO, Inc.
http://www.ceoemp.com/

ComputerWork
http://www.computerwork.com/
 Conestoga Personnel Resources Inc.(CPR)
http://www.conestogapersonnel.com/

Cooljobscanada.com
http://www.cooljobscanada.com/

CRS Job Resources
http://www.relocatecanada.com/jobs2.html

Kelly Services
http://www.kellyservices.com/

Medical Recruiting Services
http://www.medicalrecruitingservices.ca

People Bank, The
http://www.thepeoplebank.com/

Personnel Management Group, Winnipeg Manitoba
http://www.pmg.mb.ca/

Pharma
http://www.pharma-career-box.com/

Planet Recruit Canada
http://www.planetrecruit.com/
channel/int/country/Canada/

Prior Resource Group – Kitchener Jobs, Waterloo Jobs
http://www.priorresource.com/

Quantum Technology Recruiting
http://www.quantum-qtr.com/

Recruiters Online Network
http://www.recruitersonline.com/

Red Seal Recruiting Solutions Ltd
http://www.redsealrecruiting.com/

Senior Quality Personnel
http://www2.pleaseapply.to/sqprecruiters/

Showbiz Jobs
http://www.showbizjobs.com/

TEKSystems
http://www.teksystems.com/

Titan Recruitment Solutions
http://www.titanrecruitment.com/

Total Staffing Solutions
http://www.totalstaff.ca/

TRS Contract Consulting Group
http://www.trscontract.com/

Western Canada’s Careers/Recruitment Web Site
http://www.tmp.com/

Yellow Pages List of Recruitment Agencies

Corporate Job Sites
Air Canada
http://www.aircanada.ca/about-us/employment/

Alcatel
http://www.alcatel.com/

Aquent
http://www.aquent.com/

AT&T Canada Careers
http://www.attcanada.com/careers/

BrassRing
http://www.brassring.com/

Canadian Tire
http://www2.canadiantire.ca/
CTCwebsite/welcome.html

CIBC
http://www.cibc.com/ca/inside-cibc/careers.html

Edward Jones
http://www.jonesopportunity.com/ca/

Ericsson
http://www.ericsson.com/careers/

FedEx
http://www.fedex.com/ca_english/
about/employment.html

Fluor Canada Ltd.
http://www.fluorcanada.ca/career_ops/career_ops.htm

Future Shop
http://www.futureshop.ca/companyinfo/careers/en/default.asp

Hewlett Packard
http://www.jobs.hp.com/

Home Depot
http://www.homedepot.ca/escalate/store/DisplayVisitor?pls=hd_canada_gift&page=content/static_Careers&loginPage=content/static_Careers

Hummingbird
http://www.hummingbird.com/jobs/

IBM
http://www.can.ibm.com/hr/

Indigo Inc.
http://chapters.indigo.ca/article.asp?artcode=careers

Loewen Windows
http://www.loewen.com/
 

Manulife
http://www.manulife.com/corporate/corporate2.nsf/Public/FrameSetCareersApplyNow.html

MedaGroup
http://www.medagroup.com/

Microsoft Canada
http://www.microsoft.com/canada/employment/

Motorola
http://www.motorola.ca/asp/english/excitingcareers/

Nortel
http://www.nortelnetworks.com/employment/

Oracle
http://www.oracle.com/ca-en/employment/

President’s Choice Financial
http://www.banking.pcfinancial.ca/en_ca/templates/about_us/we_are_hiring.jsp?referid=sideNav

Price Waterhouse Coopers
http://www.pricewaterhousecoopers.com/ca/eng/careers/main/index.html

Rona
http://www.careers.rona.ca

Royal Bank
http://www.rbc.com/uniquecareers/

Sears Canada
http://www.sears.ca/e/careers/index.htm

Staples
http://www.greatcareersatstaples.ca/default1.asp

Sun Life
http://www.sunlife.ca/canada/cda/level1_page_career_v2/0,2329,1-8,00.html

TD Bank
http://www.td.com/hr/index.jsp

Tim Hortons
http://www.timhortons.com/en/join/corporate.html

WestJet
http://c3dsp.westjet.com/guest/jobs/index.jsp;jsessionid=C1DDDhpk7aqpV0VG5UHCD7g355Q1CCcavAos4xVFH0Sc1t81Pw2M!1496531260

Yahoo! Canada
http://ca.yahoo.com/docs/info/jobs.html

Careerowlresources.ca

http://www.careerowlresources.ca/

Cost of Living Reports
http://www.relocatecanada.com/crseri.html

 

Jobs in Canada
http://www.jooble.ca

Ressourceschouettecarriere.ca
http://ressourceschouettecarriere.ca/

For other resources and workshops aimed at   career reinvention, jobs and  business,  contact  Reinvention consultancy  here