Posts Tagged ‘ estudia y trabaja en canada ’

How to get in touch with ‘real’ Canadian employers?

Question in Detail:  Dears,  I have got Canadian immigrant visa, and I plan to come to Canada in November 2012. At the moment, I am in process of finishing a project in Yemen for a multinational. I have over 7 years of experience in managing IT, Logistics projects, and operations managmenet in 4 different countries. Of course, I would looking for work in my areas of expertiese mentioned above. I have sent my CV through a few online job portals, but haven’t received any response. I am wondering if that’s the best way to find work in Canada. Can somebody please help me with 1. determining if I can arrange a job before arrival to Canada? 2. what is the best way to approach companies (oil and gas for instance) 3. are there any job agencies that can put me in touch with companies or businesses (I am ready to pay for their service). Thanks very much in advance for help. S.

Re.

You have the million dollar question or the four  more requested  questions !

1.  Best way to find work in Canada

2.  Arrange a job before arrival to Canada

3.  Best way to approach companies

4.  Job agencies that can put me in touch with companies or businesses

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Canada immigration: new 29 list of highly demanded professions

Before was 38 List down to 29 High Demand Jobs in Canada. Some Occupations remain and some  are New.

Effective immediately, to be eligible to apply as a federal skilled worker, applicants must either have a job offer, or they must have experience in one of 29 in-demand occupations. These occupations were identified through analysis of updated labour market information and consultations with provinces, territories, stakeholders and the public.

but really the Canadian Government endures to receive requests in its general package of Federal skilled workers (FSWP) currently in 25 of the 29 occupations registered in governmental way.

Following 29 highly demanded professions come in new list.

If you are a skilled worker who has had one year of continuous full-time or corresponding part-time paid work experience in no less than one of the following eligible occupations within the last 10 years:

  • 0631: Restaurant and Food Service Managers
  • 0811: Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)
  • 1122: Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
  • 1233: Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
  • 2121: Biologists and Related Scientists 2151: Architects
  • 3111: Specialist Physicians 3112: General Practitioners and Family Physicians
  • 3113: Dentists
  • 3131: Pharmacists
  • 3142: Physiotherapists
  • 3152: Registered Nurses
  • 3215: Medical Radiation Technologists
  • 3222: Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists
  • 3233: Licensed Practical Nurses
  • 4151: Psychologists
  • 4152: Social Workers
  • 6241: Chefs
  • 6242: Cooks
  • 7215: Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
  • 7216: Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
  • 7241: Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)
  • 7242: Industrial Electricians 7251: Plumbers
  • 7265: Welders & Related Machine Operators
  • 7312: Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
  • 7371: Crane Operators
  • 7372: Drillers & Blasters – Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction
  • 8222: Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service

For the detail in the description of each occupation and its various titles and offices, should consult the official website of the National Occupational Classification NOC.   The Canadian government uses the National Occupational Classification system called (National Occupational Classification NOC). This system categorizes occupations in demand in the Canadian job market based on the following criteria:  

• “O” in management occupations, positions in the management, coordination and supervision.  

• Proficiency Level “A”: occupations that usually require college education.  

• Proficiency “B” occupations that require technical education (college) or specialized learning.

 • Proficiency “C” occupations that require secondary education (high school) or specific training.

 • Proficiency “D” occupations where training is given directly in the work.   National Occupational Classification:

The following is a condensed version of the major professions, specialties and professions that require the Canadian labor market, on the basis of the “National Occupational Classification.” Professions are included only in the categories “O”, “A” and “B”, as these take into account the Canadian point system that evaluates the capabilities of potential immigrants.   The general areas of competence of this classification are:  

• Business, Finance and Administration  

• Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

 • Health  • Social Sciences, Education, Government Service and Religion  

• Arts, Culture, Recreation and Sport  

• Trade, Transport, Equipment Operation, and related professions  

• Raw Materials Industry  

• Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities   Computer professionals and highly skilled Systems  During 1997, established a pilot program that enables Canadian employers, attract highly qualified professionals in the technical areas of Computing and Systems (software). This approach facilitates the recruitment of these staff on a temporary basis, without the necessary validation of a Human Resource Center.   This plan responds to the shortage of workers exists in Canada in these specialties and the prevailing demand industries quickly get highly qualified professionals and computer technicians.  Graduates in branches of Engineering, Information Systems or other technology-related areas are encouraged to perform a formal validation of Canadian institutions that apply.  

Nursing:  Nursing is a profession with the highest occupational demand in Canada. The public health system needs to attract as many technical and health professionals. Therefore, the government makes great efforts for recruitment. It is expected that by 2011 and through 2012. The national deficit of nurses in Canada amount to 80 thousand professionals. This is a great opportunity for foreign workers who have experience in the area.  

Care Workers and Health Care at Home (“Caregivers”)

There is special interest in working in Canadian homes remain full-time care of children, disabled people and, especially, the elderly. Over 4 million people in Canada are over 65. In fact, 1 in 7 Canadians is part of the so-called third age.

Professionals in the field of health and health care are scarce in Canada, which opens up to foreign employment opportunities in this field.   To gain approval, you must also demonstrate that you have enough money to support. There are many other options to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker. If you do not meet the criteria required by the Federal Government, we invite you to read our other sections on the various provincial programs and  A complement MI – 4 has made permissible for global PhD students to put on for enduring habitation in FSWP, however missing the further features of the unaffected FSWP.   It stood experiential that certain works fulfill additional nippily than others.

As of December 8, 2011, masses have been decided for four of the 29 occupations. This shows that the applicants to these occupations could no longer rub in further down the FSWP, till the CAP is re-established in July 2012.   Though, the 25 additional occupations are exposed now. Certain of them such as GPs and dentists are probable to be the next, with 350 requests previously putative by the CIC. Applicants for these occupations must act rapidly to safe a location in the lot of pay for this time.

E-Learning Course Catalogue

Internet Business Academy

Practical Training & Mentoring
HM Internet Business Academy is a practical training and mentoring program where we train people on the various ways so they can earn money on the Internet and at the same time mentor them till they earn money from the internet.
Set in a conducive atmosphere with each student’s  computer connected to the internet, the training is carried out by me and another seasoned professional who actually make money from the courses they teach. The training will be carried out with the aid of power point presentations, videos and practical step-by-step illustrations.
For those who are unable to come by to our office, to receive the practical training, you will soon have the option to be taught online through downloadable ebooks, step-by-step lessons, videos and real time video sessions and a forum
As a practical training, each student will be urged to try out what they have been taught and they will be guided by me or the other tutor.
It is our hope that within the first 3 months of  training each student should be able to make a living through the internet. Thats what the academy/ training course  is all about, though this is based on the effort of the students
Courses Taught At HM Internet Business Academy include:
In the near future we would add some more.
You can click on the blog to read free and useful contents in any of our courses. You can join to become a member by clicking on the membership page
 

Course Description & Costs

Course Description & Costs

Coaching details

Business Coaching

Did you know it costs 10 times more to find a new client than it does to sell to an existing client. 30 % of your clients will buy more of your products or services if you offer at point of sale…

With Business coaching – if you want massive differences in boosting sales and profits you need to focus on improving these key areas we can help:

Lead Generation, Social Media, Local Business Marketing, Lead Capture, Sales Conversions, Performance Coaching, Word Press Web Design, Repeat and  Referral Sales etc…

 Career Advice/ Career Coaching
We have a team of affiliate employment, job and career coaches who work with those unemployed, under employed, unhappily employed,  to help them identify and appreciate their skills and experience in order to proactively pursue a promotion or market themselves confidently for a new position.

Job Coaching

Job coaching can be provided to people on a short-term basis. But for long-term success, there needs to be an emphasis on natural support.

Employability Workshops

Job Search Workshop
 The job search workshop is a one-week comprehensive course where
participants learn proper job search techniques in Canada. A
supportive and multicultural learning environment is provided.
 
Topics covered are:
 •Cover Letter Writing
 •Resume Writing
 •Interview Skills
 •Hidden Job Market
 •Workplace Communication
 •Labour Market Information
 •Hard/Soft/Transferable Skills
 •Networking
 •Employment Standards
 •Effective Job Search Strategies

Complete Resume Services
 

Canada Employee Sponsored visas

Canadian Company Sponsorship

These work visas are designed for Canadian Companies  that are able to recruit highly skilled workers either from overseas or from people temporarily in Canada where an employer has been unable to fill their recruitment needs from the Canadian labour market or through their own training efforts. There are both temporary visa options and permanent visa options. Below is an outline of these visas:

Temporary Sponsorship Options
Canadian businesses that need to have their skilled positions filled but cannot find workers from within the Canadian labour force, can sponsor personnel from overseas on a temporary basis, to work in  Canada for up to 4 years.

The most common visa available under the temporary arrangements is:

Sponsorship by Canadian or overseas businesses
There are 3 steps in the application process to bring in temporary overseas staff:

Sponsorship
Business sponsorship approval must be obtained by the business wishing to sponsor overseas workers. The business demonstrates that it is of good standing, shows the benefits of an overseas employee, and provides adequate training plans and expenditure. Employers are required to meet a number of undertakings in relation to the sponsored employee.   For instance  licensed  lawyers will personally meet with the  Canadian Employer and provide any documentation required for the process.   License Canadian lawyers  will compile and professionally submit the application by mail.  Oline applications would  only be safe within Canada , as this  method of application could provide quicker processing times.

Nomination
The nomination must relate to an occupation that meets a minimum skills threshold covering managerial, professional, associate professional and trade occupations.  Check  for instance (BC PNP) . An occupation is selected and you need to meet the correct qualifications and work experience that pertains to that occupation. There are criteria applicable for the nomination and licensed lawyers will provide the information required to both the Canadian company and the nominee to ensure that a comprehensive application is submitted.

Visa Application
The overseas skilled employee that is nominated must apply for a visa to enter and remain in  Canada. The application will need to demonstrate that they have the skills and qualifications applicable to the nominated occupation. Other criterion needs to be met and licensed migration lawyers will provide the required information to the applicant and will professionally compile and submit the application by mail or in person  for priority processing.

Study and Work in Canada

Study and Work in Canada  

You are considered to be an ‘international student’ if you come to Canada, on a temporary basis, for the purpose of pursuing an accredited course of study.  To study in Canada, international students require a study permit, and in some cases a temporary resident visa, issued by Canada immigration authorities outside of Canada.  

  For more information on what you need to secure permission to study in Canada, consult the website of Citizenship and Immigration Canada.  This same blog explains how study and work experience in Canada in some posts and what can make you eligible for permanent residence in Canada in the “Canadian Experience” category.      

Working while you are a student in Canada      

As an international student in Canada you can get a job which will allow you to earn money and valuable work experience too.   In fact the Government of Canada offers special kinds of work permits just for you. 

There are three ways to benefit from work opportunities:

   •If you are a full-time student you can work on  the university campus you are registered  for up to 20 hours per week as soon as your academic program begins.

•Once you have completed six months of full-time study, you can apply for an off-campus work permit.  Usually international centres at any given university conducts sessions about off-campus work permits twice a month.  Attendance is mandatory at one of these sessions if you are interested in applying for an off-campus work permit.

•As you approach graduation, you may consider working in Canada for up to three years through the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program.  This program has  no restrictions on the location or the type of employment, and no requirement that you have a job offer before applying.  

  

These government programs require particular documentation and application processes. Our legal partners will help you to understand and navigate the system offering  Immigration Help Sessions year round.  

Creating Jobs and Wealth for Canadians

Profit From Your Canadian Immigrant Advantage

7 reasons it makes sense for you to pursue your entrepreneurial dream — today!

I know the idea can be intim­i­dat­ing. I started my last com­pany, a suc­cess­ful media ven­ture, as an immi­grant from the US. Although I spoke Eng­lish, I found many aspects of doing busi­ness in Canada  dif­fer­ent than in my home coun­try. It took me a while to real­ize that I had an edge that many immi­grants share. I call it Your Immi­grant Advan­tage.

Because I was new to this coun­try and get­ting to know it for the first time, I real­ized I could see oppor­tu­ni­ties that Canadians might over­look. Taking business administration training, I ulti­mately built a busi­ness in an untapped niche of the media. I closed it after two years and am excited to fol­low up with this new ven­ture, a long held dream for me.

You might won­der if now is a good time to start a busi­ness in Canada. There’s no deny­ing that an eco­nomic down­turn is going to bring chal­lenges to any busi­ness. But entrust­ing your future secu­rity to an employer that could lay you off at any moment can be just as risky. Start­ing a busi­ness, in con­trast, can bring you con­trol of your des­tiny and a chance to build sig­nif­i­cant wealth.

Here are seven rea­sons it makes sense to start a busi­ness in Canada.

1. There’s startup money out there. Even in a tight lend­ing cli­mate, it is pos­si­ble to find fund­ing in Canada.  Many Canada entre­pre­neurs get their start in busi­ness by bor­row­ing money from friends and fam­ily or sell­ing a small stake in a bud­ding ven­ture to an out­side investor. Even those who don’t have a rich uncle can join the proud legions of entre­pre­neurs who have “boot­strapped” their com­pa­nies from day one, fund­ing any growth from the sales they make.

2. Red tape.  Canada is not a far eas­ier place to start a busi­ness than almost any­where else. but, for instance, you can incor­po­rate in a few days. Canada has a bit of European lifestyle, if you do’t know your way around  bureau­cracy can squash the entre­pre­neur­ial spirit. You need a per­mit for every­thing you do.

3. Smart Labor Code . They tend to be employer friendly, for the most part, and are not as puni­tive in Euro­pean coun­tries if you need to let peo­ple go.  In Canada, there is much less flex­i­bil­ity for the busi­ness owner to react to chang­ing mar­ket conditions.

4. Less cor­rup­tion. If you have been frus­trated by a busi­ness cul­ture where pay­ing bribes is required to get things done, you may be relieved to know that laws against bribery in  Canada gen­er­ally get enforced.

5. Things work. Many  Canadians take it for granted that there is a robust, inde­pen­dent legal sys­tem; reli­able and cost effi­cient trans­porta­tion; a reli­able power infra­struc­ture; and an out­stand­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tions net­work. If you’ve lived in a coun­try where these things are not the norm, I am cer­tain you will appre­ci­ate how much they add to the ease of doing business.

6. An out­stand­ing tal­ent pool. The Canadian  uni­ver­sity sys­tem  offers a world-class edu­ca­tion – and has the work­force to match.

7. There’s no shame in upward mobil­ity. This is an entre­pre­neur­ial cul­ture that rewards inno­va­tion – and new­com­ers can join it quickly if they speak the lan­guage. Why not start pur­su­ing your Canadian dream today? I’d like to help you, by pro­vid­ing training   and  use­ful tips and inspi­ra­tion from other entre­pre­neur­ial immigrants.

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