Posts Tagged ‘ Canada Best Employers ’

Creating Jobs and Wealth for Canadians

Profit From Your Canadian Immigrant Advantage

7 reasons it makes sense for you to pursue your entrepreneurial dream — today!

I know the idea can be intim­i­dat­ing. I started my last com­pany, a suc­cess­ful media ven­ture, as an immi­grant from the US. Although I spoke Eng­lish, I found many aspects of doing busi­ness in Canada  dif­fer­ent than in my home coun­try. It took me a while to real­ize that I had an edge that many immi­grants share. I call it Your Immi­grant Advan­tage.

Because I was new to this coun­try and get­ting to know it for the first time, I real­ized I could see oppor­tu­ni­ties that Canadians might over­look. Taking business administration training, I ulti­mately built a busi­ness in an untapped niche of the media. I closed it after two years and am excited to fol­low up with this new ven­ture, a long held dream for me.

You might won­der if now is a good time to start a busi­ness in Canada. There’s no deny­ing that an eco­nomic down­turn is going to bring chal­lenges to any busi­ness. But entrust­ing your future secu­rity to an employer that could lay you off at any moment can be just as risky. Start­ing a busi­ness, in con­trast, can bring you con­trol of your des­tiny and a chance to build sig­nif­i­cant wealth.

Here are seven rea­sons it makes sense to start a busi­ness in Canada.

1. There’s startup money out there. Even in a tight lend­ing cli­mate, it is pos­si­ble to find fund­ing in Canada.  Many Canada entre­pre­neurs get their start in busi­ness by bor­row­ing money from friends and fam­ily or sell­ing a small stake in a bud­ding ven­ture to an out­side investor. Even those who don’t have a rich uncle can join the proud legions of entre­pre­neurs who have “boot­strapped” their com­pa­nies from day one, fund­ing any growth from the sales they make.

2. Red tape.  Canada is not a far eas­ier place to start a busi­ness than almost any­where else. but, for instance, you can incor­po­rate in a few days. Canada has a bit of European lifestyle, if you do’t know your way around  bureau­cracy can squash the entre­pre­neur­ial spirit. You need a per­mit for every­thing you do.

3. Smart Labor Code . They tend to be employer friendly, for the most part, and are not as puni­tive in Euro­pean coun­tries if you need to let peo­ple go.  In Canada, there is much less flex­i­bil­ity for the busi­ness owner to react to chang­ing mar­ket conditions.

4. Less cor­rup­tion. If you have been frus­trated by a busi­ness cul­ture where pay­ing bribes is required to get things done, you may be relieved to know that laws against bribery in  Canada gen­er­ally get enforced.

5. Things work. Many  Canadians take it for granted that there is a robust, inde­pen­dent legal sys­tem; reli­able and cost effi­cient trans­porta­tion; a reli­able power infra­struc­ture; and an out­stand­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tions net­work. If you’ve lived in a coun­try where these things are not the norm, I am cer­tain you will appre­ci­ate how much they add to the ease of doing business.

6. An out­stand­ing tal­ent pool. The Canadian  uni­ver­sity sys­tem  offers a world-class edu­ca­tion – and has the work­force to match.

7. There’s no shame in upward mobil­ity. This is an entre­pre­neur­ial cul­ture that rewards inno­va­tion – and new­com­ers can join it quickly if they speak the lan­guage. Why not start pur­su­ing your Canadian dream today? I’d like to help you, by pro­vid­ing training   and  use­ful tips and inspi­ra­tion from other entre­pre­neur­ial immigrants.

Canada-Immigrants In Business Enterprise Sector

In Wise5,  a recent study of immigrant entrepreneurs funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, researchers found that immigrants who succeeded in business often followed a similar pathway.  Immigrants did not start new businesses right after arrival.  Rather, they first adjusted to living in Canada and learned about Canadian business culture.  Like Maria Luisa, many  worked in their field of interest first, learning Canadian practices and preferences first-hand, and finding a mentor who advised and helped them.  Often they pursued some upgrading, including language courses and business seminars.

“Immigrants are pulling their weight in the economy, and are just as likely — and sometimes even more likely — than Canadian-born [residents] to be business owners,” says Beverly Rodrigez, a senior fellow with the Bevor Consulting Services. “You see that immigration has grown a lot, and so has immigrant business ownership.”
People have a hard time understanding how immigrants can come into the economy without displacing native…workers,” says Barbara Ujamaa,  graduate student of an  Entreprenuership Program, which co-released a version of the report highlighting Ontario local implications. “But they create their own niche…. These small businesses that crop up fulfill a need…and become job creators.”

Beverly in her dissertation  pointed out that in Ontario, immigrant business ownership is closely linked to immigrant labor, which have both increased dramatically over the last twenty years.

Immigrant labor is a good thing, because it attracts these small entrepreneurs to come and fill a niche in our economy,” Beverly added.

Across the country,  Barbara says, the diversity of these businesses is also impressive. In addition to bigger tech companies, there are a lot of “bread and butter businesses,”  she says. “Grocery stores, nail salons, gas stations…that I think are making a pretty big difference. In many places, that’s what defines a neighborhood.”

La Mexicana Tortilleria y Antojitos.http://tortillerialamexicana.ca/   is an example of  small business ownership by a  recent female and immigrant entreprenuer.

If you are thinking of starting a business, take some time to inform yourself before making a decision.  Most Canadian cities have small business centres that can help you assess the advantages and disadvantages of different types of business, including regulations, licencing and certification.  They can also provide direction about writing a business plan, which is required for bank loans.  Some settlement organizations offer business services if not you can always count with our customized service here.

 

Entreprenuership Education Training

The Entrepreneurship  Training  is comprised of three (3) core trainings:

1. Business Plan Training (BPT): Series of four (4) workshops covering the following topics:

• Introduction to Entrepreneurship

 Identifying Business Opportunities

Types of Business (Legal Aspects of Business)

Understanding Customer Behavior

Understanding Marketing Concepts (Marketing Plan)

Selecting the Right Products/Pricing

Understanding Business Plan

Drafting a basic Business Plan

2. Financial Management Training (FMT): Series of two (2) workshops covering the following topics:

Understanding Financial Management

Developing Record Keeping Systems

Preparing and Interpreting Financial Statements

3.Loan Application Training (LAT): Series of two (2) workshops covering the following topics:

Developing a Financing Strategy

Structuring & Repaying Loans

Components of a basic Loan Application Package

Completing the Loan Application

After successfully completing the Entrepreneurship  Training,  clients will be able to receive individualized business counseling and participate in targeted workshops to learn about business issues not covered in the core trainings. Graduates of the Training  will also be eligible to apply for any Microenterprise Loans through special agencies. Contact here

 

 

Study English | Looking for a Work-Program in Canada?

Paid Work Programs

Canadian Working Holiday  Program  Spend an absolutely amazing vacation working in Canada and truly “experience” from this beautiful country.  Learn More

Camp Canada Work Program

The Camp Canada Work Program, also known as “CCWP”, is a program that meets the demands of Canadian summer camps for summer staff, while enabling international young people to earn some income to support their holiday in Canada.  Learn More

English Co-op Program

This work and study program is designed to allow students to develop their English skills.

We help you with the nitty gritty stuff that you need to do when you land in Canada – assistance in opening a bank account, registering for a Social Insurance Number, getting your resume prepared, and MOST IMPORTANTLY,  JOB ASSISTANT SERVICE!  We save you money as we get you working faster and help you get the best deals on accommodations, travel and other services you need.

 

Internships in Canada

Participate in day-to-day operations to see how Canadian companies operate, develop new skills and make great contacts in your field. International work experience in Canada looks great on your resume and employers will see the value of your past work.

With Internship programs, you will obtain an internship position before you depart your home country and you will know which company you will be working for and where it is located before you leave your front door!

Why Intern  •Get real world, hands-on experience in your field of work or study  •Participate in day-to-day operations to see how Canadian companies operate  •Learn about Canadian business culture  •Develop new skills and build networking relationships in your field  •Improve your business and interpersonal skills  •Improve your English skills  •Improve career opportunities

Internships Available   All placements in these fields are UNPAID. All fields require relevant education of at least 1-year at the university or college level.

 

Volunteering in Canada

HC offers volunteer placements to individuals travelling to or within Canada in the areas of wildlife, environment and conservation. Gain valuable life experience, meet new people, see new places and do something good for the world!

Next ……e 4 exciting projects to choose from

 

 

Marisol Diaz is  Business developer and author specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful career opportunities for local and international trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting career opportunity in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, seminars and Workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products

Immigrants: Starting a business in Canada

The Immigrant Entrepreneur Visa Category is intended for prospective immigrants who propose to establish a new business or who propose to purchase all or part of an existing business that has supportable prospects for expansion in any province in Canada

 The Canadian goverment  is also ramping up our support for immigrant entrepreneurs, those  who’ve long been a tremendous source of innovation in  Canada.  Immigrants are twice as likely as native-born  Canadian to start companies – although a greater proportion also struggle to keep their businesses open for longer than a year.  That’s why  the Canadian goverment has been creating  a new competition that challenges community-based organizations to come up with programs that can help immigrant businesses across the city grow to scale.  At the same time,  in many provinces the Canadian goverment is has been offering some of  its  business courses and programs  in Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Russian – which will allow us to connect to hundreds of new businesses in our immigrant communities. Read here  about  a Business Immigrant Mentorship Program

 There are four types of entrepreneurs who contribute substantially to economic development and job creation in Canada.

The categories are not mutually exclusive as some business characteristics can be found across these typologies but they do have distinct characteristics.

  • Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses
  • Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators.
  • Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
  • Immigrant Transnational Businesses

1. Immigrant Neighborhood Storefront Businesses:  These are low-to-moderate-income (LMI) businesses, largely retail and personal services. They start small and frequently stay small and usually locate their businesses in economically distressed areas with lower rents. .eg. http://tortillerialamexicana.ca/

This group has special challenges that include limited English; low familiarity with Canadian cultural and business practices; little or no credit history and little or no business and/or management education.

 The businesses are alternatives to wage employment and involve extremely long hours and hard work. Employees are more often than not other family members. The goal of the business owners, often called “Necessity Entrepreneurs”, is to make a life for themselves, their families and to ensure their children’s future. They usually do not expect to pass on the business to their children and frequently note that they are working extraordinarily hard so their children can get an education and not have to work as hard. However, some of these business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

2. Immigrant High-Tech and Health Science Entrepreneurs/Innovators

These entrepreneurs apply their scientific education and expertise to the creation of a product or service in technology or medical drugs/treatments. The goal of the business owner is often, but not always, to develop the technology and have it acquired by a larger company clearing the way for creating new products and services.

3. Immigrant Non-Tech Growth Businesses
These are businesses in real estate, manufacturing, retail, wholesale, transportation, construction, leisure and hospitality, etc. They are the core businesses that drive the province, regional and national economies and become important employers in their community and province.

These businesses are credited with revitalizing economically depressed neighborhoods and communities. These business owners are interested in expanding their businesses into multiple locations and/or allied businesses in which the children may be involved.

4. Immigrant Transnational Businesses

These businesses are a new phenomenon of “Keeping Feet in Both Worlds”. Immigrant transnationalism refers to the regular engagement in economic, political and socio-cultural activities spanning national borders.

These transnational entrepreneurs are playing an important role in facilitating international trade, investment and “diaspora tourism”. They are a heterogeneous group coming from many countries, crossing ethnic, immigrant and minority boundaries possessing different motivations and experiences.  Now within it , there are four distinct types of immigrant transnational enterprises: Circuit firms involved in the transfer of goods and remittances across countries; Cultural enterprises that rely on their daily contacts with the home country and depend on the desire of immigrants for cultural goods in Canada such as shows, CDs and newspapers; Ethnic enterprises that are small retail firms catering to the immigrant community, which depends on a steady supply of imported goods; Return migrant enterprises that are businesses established by returnees that rely on their contacts in Canada.

Start a business in Canada ! , Your opportunity is now businesses, create jobs for their community and wealth for their families. That’s why they are often called “Opportunity Entrepreneurs”.

 Learn how we can support you and help you make your business flourish. If you are exploring entrepreneurship, our orientation workshops are the perfect place to start. Begin your entrepreneurial journey with Hineni Media and the workshops, multi-week classes, and events. We offer for women and men at every stage of the entrepreneurial cycle.

This fall, connect with the resources you need to start your business or bring your existing business to new heights, and discover why Hineni Media is the place where success grows.

Onward and upward,

Marisol Diaz

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

10 great Canadian Franchises bets

Start your own franchise or business opportunity in Canada. Learn more about available franchise opportunities for sale in Canada.  That can be the rightful,legal and prompt way to settle, live and work in Canada.

Franchise generally means a right or privilege. Wouldn’t you love to earn that privilege in Canada?

Franchising, a business method that involves licensing of trademarks and methods of doing business, such as:

  • Chain store, retail outlets which share a brand and central management
  • An exclusive right, for example to sell branded merchandise
  • Media franchise, ownership of the characters and setting of a film, video game, book, etc., particularly in North American ( US/Canada) usage

Did You Know? More Canadians own franchises per capita than anywhere else in the world! Own a franchise and be in business for yourself, but not by yourself. Take advantage of the experience and success of a proven franchise system to help meet your financial and business goals! Franchising represents a way to tap into existing market needs and growth industries without assuming all of the risk associated with independent business startups.

We have mentorship experience with franchised business opportunities in all five main franchise industries! There are Food Franchise Businesses, Retail Franchises, Automotive Franchises, Business to Business Franchises, and Home/Personal Franchises. Which one is right for You? Check here  10 popular Canadian Franchises.

Turn Your Dreams of Work and Business Ownership Into A Reality!

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.


Most Canadian Popular Franchises

 Do you dream of being a franchise owner? Scope out this list of the most popular brands over the past decade — and how well their owners have done at repaying startup loans backed by the  Canada Small Business.

Tim Hortons Inc. (TSX: THI, NYSE: THI) is a Canadian fast casual [3] restaurant known for its coffee and doughnuts. It is also Canada’s largest fast food service with over 3000 stores nationwide.

Tim Hortons has one of the most successful marketing operations in Canada, approaching the level of a symbol of national identity. With powerful and effective branding, the store has established itself in the top class of fast-food restaurants in Canada.

Dollarama & Great Canadian Dollar Store

Dollarama is a chain of over 652 dollar stores across Canada. The company is headquartered in Montreal and is Canada’s largest retailer of items for 2 dollars or less, since 2009. [2] Many of its stores are located in the province of Quebec where the chain first began. The first Dollarama store was created at the shopping centre “Les promenades du St-Laurent” in Matane. Dollarama now has stores in every province of Canada, with Ontario having the most stores.

 7-11 Convenience Store: 7-Eleven offers an extended hour, retail convenience store, providing groceries, take out foods and beverages, dairy products, non-food merchandise, specialty items and selected services which emphasize convenience to the customer.

Burger King Corporation 
Fast food hamburger restaurants. Home of the Whopper and chicken sandwiches, fish sandwiches, and salads.
 
Total Investment  $1,000,000
Minimum Cash Required

 Second Cup: is Canada’s largest Canadian-based specialty coffee retailer, operating more than 360 cafés across Canada.[1] Founded in 1975 by Tom Culligan and Frank O’Dea, Culligan eventually purchased O’Dea’s shares. After building it to a 150-store chain, he sold it in 1988 to Michael Bregman.

 Mary Brown’s is a Canadian fast-food restaurant chain most popular for its Big Mary sandwich, chicken and ‘taters’ or potato wedges. Its process involves marinating chicken for up to 48 hours prior to cooking. The company has 83 locations in Canada: 38 in Newfoundland and Labrador, 30 in Ontario, 12 in Alberta, and three in Nova Scotia. It advertises using the slogans Now we’re talkin’ chicken!!!  Famous chicken & taters!
Subway. Home of the $5 footlong sub, Subway is the biggest fast-food chain in the world, with almost 33,000 outposts in 91 countries.

The initial franchise fee startup is $15,000, a fairly low sum compared to other brands.

The combination of global branding, minimal upfront outlay of cash, and low loan default rates have made Subway the most popular brand in the last decade for entrepreneurs looking to open a franchise, according to the SBA’s lending data.

Quiznos. The shop known for its toasted subs looks like a riskier investment than its formidable competition, Subway: One in four franchise owners was unable to make good on their SBA-backed loan.

The typical startup fee for a new Quiznos franchise is $25,000, but in an effort to add stores to its 5,000-member army, Quiznos announced last week that it would slash that upfront cost to $5,000 for entrepreneurs who already have restaurant management experience.

The UPS
UPS scooped up business services and shipping center Mail Boxes Etc. in 2001 and promptly rebranded almost all of the locations as The UPS Store

 Dairy Queen

Dairy Queen celebrates its 70th birthday this year, and its famous Blizzard treat — blended soft serve ice-cream with candies, cookies and fruits — turns 25.

Berkshire Hathaway, the company run by legendary investor Warren Buffet, acquired the iconic company in 1998. Today, it boasts 5,700 locations around the globe and a single-digit failure rate for its SBA-backed franchise loans, making it one of the safer investments in the food franchise market. A first-time owner will face a $35,000 initial license fee.
 Days Inn
Days Inn is another member of the Wyndham Hotel Group’s franchise family. Launched in 1970, the chain currently boasts 1,900 hotels throughout 15 countries.

 

Curves for Women

Women like the “no makeup, no men, and no mirrors” philosophy and 30-minute workout regime: Curves has grown exponentially since its first location launched in Texas in 1992. It now claims 10,000 locations in 70 countries and 4 million members.

The overhead costs are pretty low, but the investment can be risky. Curves’ fast expansion goes hand in hand with a relatively high churn rate, and almost 16% of its SBA-backed franchise loans this decade failed. The company topped Entrepreneur magazine’s annual “fastest-growing franchises” list in 2003 and 2005, but this year, it didn’t make the top 100.

Mr Lube is a Canadian chain of automotive service centres, specializing in oil changes and other scheduled maintenance. It has almost 100 locations in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. It was founded in 1976 by Clifford Giese, who opened its first location in Edmonton, Alberta. Mr. Lube is the largest quick oil chain in Canada.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK  is a franchised moving company, headquartered in Lansing, Michigan, with franchises in 32 states in the United States, as well as Canada and Ireland. The company is the largest franchised moving company in the United States. It has more than 200 locations.

  Internet Franchise WSI 
Over a decade of successful franchising and another new record; WSI ranks among the Top 50 companies listed in the 2006 Entrepreneur Magazine’s Annual Franchise 500 – the franchise industry’s equivalent of the Fortune 500 public index. For the sixth consecutive year, WSI has maintained its position as the world’s #1 Internet and Technology Services Franchise.

WSI also holds the singular distinction as the only Canadian company in the Entrepreneur Magazine’s list of Top Ten Global franchises offering international opportunities.

 

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the   Canadian database  for Int’l  Professional or Hineni CED ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Available only to premium subscribers.