Posts Tagged ‘ becoming a certified Canadian practitioners ’

Application For A Work Permit | Getting Into Canada

 If you want to work in Canada for a limited period of time, in most cases, you must have a valid work permit issued by the Canadian government

Types of Working Visas:

1. Temporary Work Visas
2. Skilled Worker Visa (one of the easiest ways to migrate to Canada)

For the  TWV, you will need to meet the following requirements:

Some temporary workers require a work visa and some do not. For some categories of workers, visas are approved more quickly. The requirements and processing times depend on the sort of work the applicant will do when they come to Canada.

To be employed in Canada, foreign workers must generally obtain a positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from Service Canada, unless the work category is exempt from the LMO process. A Labour Market Opinion confirms that the Canadian employer is authorised to employ a foreign worker. Thereafter, foreign workers must generally apply for a work visa at a Canadian visa office abroad. Depending on the type of work they will undertake in Canada and where they have resided in the last year, foreign workers may also require a medical examination before entering Canada.

For the SWV, you will need to meet the following requirements:

Have the minimum work experience necessary
Have sufficient stand-by funds for the initial re-settling
Qualify for the visa by earning the minimum necessary points
Have the requisite language skills (qualify in the language tests according to the Canadian benchmarks)
Your visa application will pass through a six level selection test after qualifying the point system mentioned above.

Canada Work Permits

Almost all foreign national who wants to work in Canada must have a valid work permit to work in Canada.  Below steps to easy up the journey:

•Download the temporary work permit application kit and guide (in PDF). You can also contact the Canadian embassy, high commission or consulate responsible for your area to have a temporary work permit application kit mailed to you.

• Read the guide carefully. Processing fees for temporary work permit applications are not refundable, so be sure you are eligible for a temporary work permit and can meet the requirements before you apply.

• Follow the instructions to complete the forms and attach the required documents. Make a copy of your application for your own records.

•Pay the fee and get an official receipt. Check with your local visa office on fees and how to pay them.

•Submit your application. For details on accepted methods of submitting your application,  consult the visa office responsible for your area.

Work Permit Validations: work permit without HRSDC

The Human Resource Development Canada (HRSDC) is responsible for the validation of the potential position and will consider only the factors related to the specific job. Although validation is not necessarily a requirement by law, it is the most common way to verify that the Canadian job market will not be adversely affected by the introduction of a foreign worker. This process is completed within Canada, and demands considerable effort on the part of the prospective employer. The time requirement for the process is generally approximately 4-6 weeks.

Some exceptions to the work permit without HRSDC confirmation include people who are in Canada and need to support themselves  or in  if they are going through an immigration or refugee application.

You should know that  some volunteer activities and international students at  Canadian universities on-campus employment do not require a Work Permit.  For those, a valid Study Permit is enought as it allows an international student to work ON-CAMPUS ONLY at the institution where he/she is registered as a full-time student.

If you’re working under PGWP,(postgraduate work permit)  then you don’t need an Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO).  Your job is a HRSDC confirmation exempt,  under this status you don’t need an Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO).  And since you’re already working in Canada, there can be no question about its authenticity, i.e. nothing to be verified by HRSDC’s AEO.  A letter from your employer confirming their willingness to continue hiring you on a permanent basis once you get your PR is sufficient, it will do. This could be incorporated in your letter of employment and further supported by your employment contract.
If you are not a student but you are already working in Canada under a work permit  and want to extend your working status you need to apply for an LMO.  You first need to get your employer to do an LMO application for you as they are not easy. You SHOULD be awarded 10 points for arranged employment (AE)  with just an LMO. You might need to do an AEO later on, after LMO approval, but first you need to get LMO.

Professionals, businesspersons, traders and investors entering Canada to carry out work as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement do not need a confirmation from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). A similar regulation exists for other people entering into Canada who require work permits which may be governed by other international agreements.

Some entrepreneurs, intra-company transferees and other workers who provide a significant benefit to Canada may not need to request a confirmation from HRSDC either.

NAFTA

Under NAFTA, U.S. and Mexican citizens have exactly the same rights to work in Canada in the NAFTA  categories. Again, application is made directly at the border with proof of U.S. or Mexican citizenship, a job offer, and the necessary qualifications. There is an application fee of $150 Cdn.

Under the NAFTA treaty, citizens of Canada, the United States and Mexico can gain quicker, easier temporary entry into the three countries to work, conduct business or engage in investment activities.  Business people covered by NAFTA do not need a labour market opinion from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC). This means that Canadian employers do not need to have a job offer approved by HRSDC to employ a United States or a Mexican business person, as set out in NAFTA. Business people covered by NAFTA must, however, comply with the general provisions on temporary entry to Canada. NAFTA work permit is a great option for any North American professionals such a lawyers, doctors, dentists and teachers to work temporarily in Canada.

The Live-In Caregiver Program

The Live-In Caregiver Program (LIC) in Canada  is offered and administered by the government of Canada and is the primary means by which foreign caregivers come to Canada as eldercare, special needs, and childcare providers.  Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Foreign live-in Caregivers must meet certain Citizenship and Immigration Canada criteria before being admitted to Canada. These criteria reflect the education, language and skill level necessary for the foreign worker’s successful integration into the Canadian labour market:

1. Successful completion of the equivalent of a Canadian high school education.
2. Six months of full-time training or 12 months of experience in a field or occupation related to the job you are offering. For example, the training or experience may be in early childhood education, geriatric care, paediatric nursing or first aid. 
3. Ability to speak, read and understand either English or French. The Caregiver must be able to function independently in a home setting. 

Read more about the Live-in Caregiver  Program

Quebec  Immigration Processs, read this post   and also here

Note : You dont need a immigration lawyer. Your waisting time and money  remember, it is the government who pays an immigration officer to decide the outcome of your case, not them.  First thing you do is to check the website of  CIC.  All the information, from empty forms,  fees and processing time, etc is there.

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  or  the Canadian Employers Directory  ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

Our Canadian database  for Int’l Employers !

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Search for Jobs or Seasonal Visa Jobs  in Canada. Available only to premium subscribers.

Working via a recruitment agency:Canada

Finding a job in the Canada

If you do not speak English or French and are not familiar with the Canadian labour market it might be difficult to find a job in Canada.  You can try by reacting to adverts in the newspaper, sending open application letters, or via friends and relatives.  However, one of the best ways to find a job in Canada is to get the service of a  brokerage company. Experts in not only the brokering of employment, but the marketing aspects that need to surround each job seeker. With Canada’s unemployment rate reaching higher and higher levels, job seekers need to take every angle in marketing themselves for potential employment.

A service research and employment brokerage company

 Almost 20% of Canadian employees have (at one time) worked via an  agency as a temp, and since many agencies can also find you permanent contracts with a company (‘werving en selectie’), even more employees find work via an agency.

 These agencies are an important part of the Canadian labour market; almost all companies use the help of an agency to find suitable staff.  Most agencies are a member of an employer’s federation (ABU or NBBU).  They ensure that, under the Collective Labour Agreement for Temporary Workers (CAO), good employee benefits are being observed. 

 Working via a Canadian recruitment agency

In Canada it is quite common to let a (specialised)  agency help you to find the perfect job.  They have the expertise concerning selection procedures, contracts, remunerations etc. and have the contacts with companies. 

We are not recruiters. We are not an executive placement firm. We are a service and brokerage company that works specifically for the job seeker to gain new employment. We expand on the marketability of each client. Simply put, we provide the missing link that websites, recruiters and placement firms cannot provide.

 Almost all companies use the help of an agency to find suitable staff.  Most agencies are member of an employer’s federation (ABU or NBBU).  These ensure that, under the Collective Labour Agreement for Temporary Workers (CAO), good employee benefits are being observed.  Recruitment agencies are free of charge to candidates registering.   

  • you can be offered a contract directly with the company
  • you can be offered a fixed-term contract (detachering)
  • you can be offered a temporary placement

 

Detachering can be used e.g. for projects or replacement during maternity leave or long term illness, offering security for a certain period of time. Temporary placement means you will be working on a temporary contract which means a lot of freedom for both parties. This is also often used as a trial period for companies before actually offering a contract with the company.

Working via an agency means that you have a contract with the agency, but are actually working within another company. The  agency is your formal employer and pays your salary. Because of the CAO you are ensured of good employee benefits, equal to any other contract.

Hineni Media  specialised publishing  content, connections, tips , resources, office jobs such as administration, secretarial work, health , commerce, hospitality, agricultural, finance, IT and logistics. All candidates should have an excellent knowledge of their own language plus a good command of English. Our vacancies listing range from beginners positions up to executive level. Unfortunately we cannot help foreigners who wish to work in  cleaning, low factories etc., but we might be able to provide you with addresses of other agencies that do deal in those fields.

Looking to work overseas? Head to Canada, Australia or Thailand!

CANBERRA (Reuters) – Looking to work overseas? Head to Canada, Australia or Thailand, according to an annual global survey which found recession-hit Britain was one of the worst locations to live for expatriates.

The second annual Expat Experience survey, commissioned by HSBC Bank International, revealed that expats in Canada  have the best quality of life and found it among the easiest places in the world to integrate with the local population.

Australia and Thailand also came in the top three in the survey of 3,146 people working in 30 different industries and 50 countries, even though Thailand was one of the countries worst-hit by the recession for expats.

“We have seen that there is a distinct trade-off between income and overall quality of life, as many of the top performers … scored toward the bottom of this report’s league table (of the best places to make and save money),” said Betony Taylor, spokeswoman for HSBC Bank International.

“What is clear is that the locations where salaries may not be as high, such as Canada and Australia, are where expats are really enjoying not only an increased quality of life but are also finding it easy to fit in to their new communities.”

Last year Germany, Canada and Spain were the top three countries deemed to have the best lifestyle for expats.

This year Britain was one of the lowest ranked locations when it came to lifestyle after being named as one of the most expensive places for expats with the recession taking its toll.

About 44 percent of expats in Britain are considering returning home, compared with only 15 percent of expats overall.

About 41 percent of expats in Britain find it difficult to find somewhere to live, most find the quality of their accommodation drops after moving to Britain, and a third claim their health has deteriorated since moving there.

“Despite this, the UK does hold the crown for being expat entertainment capital of the world, with over half (58 percent) of expats in the UK saying that the quality of entertainment had increased,” said Taylor.

She added that 62 percent of expats also said that employment prospects were the main reason keeping them in the region.

Results from a different section of the survey, which was conducted by research company FreshMinds, released earlier found Russia was home to the highest proportion of expats earning more than $250,000 with 30 percent of international workers there banking that amount, followed by Hong Kong and Japan.

The lowest-paid expats live in Australia and Belgium with the majority — 63 percent and 61 percent respectively — earning less than $100,000.

Source Yahoo.
http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/reuters/091125/odds/odd_us_survey_odd

4 Steps to having your Credentials Recognized in Canada

You might ask yourself  how can I get work in my profession in Canada and I telling you that many internationally-trained professionals are surprised by how much time and effort it can take to work in their profession in Canada.

The high levels of education and experience that help you get into the country are not always recognized by professional associations or employers. So it’s best to research and prepare as much as you can before you leave your home country.

A good place to start is with the province professional association in your field. They can tell you whether you’ll need to apply for registration before you can work in your profession in Canada.

Regulatory bodies work with, but are separate from, professional associations. For example, Ontario has both a board of registration (a regulatory body) for Nurses (http://www.cno.org/) and a Ontario Association of nurses (http://www.rnao.org/ ).

Start with  these 4 easy steps:

  • What’s your profession?
  • Find out whether you need a special license or accreditation to practice your profession
  • Check to find out how their occupation in Canada differs from the same occupation in your country of origin and find out the demand for people in your field in various parts of Canada
  • where? visit www.credentials.gc.ca

Professional associations sites also provide specific information for international applicants. You may find information about:

•Certification and registration.
•Examination schedules and preparation.
•Core professional competencies.
•Skills upgrading and professional development courses.
•Internship, work experience and mentoring programs.
•Academic bridging programs.
•Industry trends and information.
•Career centres and job postings.

If you can’t find a professional association in your field

Almost every occupation is connected to some kind of professional, industry or sector association in Canada.

•Use a search engine such as http://www.google.ca/ to search by profession or occupation name and location (for example, “Nurses Toronto, Ontario”).

Obstacles you could face while in Canada in your field.
 
•All or part of your education may not be recognized. You may need to take courses at a college or university. This may take several years.
•Certification exams are held at set times – often only once or twice a year. And it takes time to prepare for exams.
•You usually need to be in Canada to have your credentials assessed.
•You may need Canadian work experience to get licensed, or to get a job.
•Your occupation may not exist in Canada under the same name.
•In most professions, you will need good English language skills.

Best  Solutions

Register for Co-Ops & Internships Programs

Co-op and Internship programs offer undergraduate students the opportunity to apply the skills they’ve learned the classroom to a real world work environment. As a co-op or internship student, you’ll gain valuable work experience, make industry connections and even earn some money while you’re at it.  Available listings here

In addition to the valuable experience and good pay that a Co-op or Internship will give you, very many of the Opportunities listed on this website also provide travel reimbursement, Housing and Meals. So, don’t let concerns about living expenses or the location of an organization posted on this website prevent you from checking out an exciting and challenging Co-op or Internship position!!

– Note that many organizations do NOT use the term “Co-op”, but DO use the terms “Internship”, or “Summer Undergraduate Research” or “Student Research” (or other similar “research” descriptions) to mean the same as “Co-op”. ALL of the Co-ops, Internships, and the various Research Positions included in this website are Non Paid and Paid, Full-time, Short-term (10-20 weeks) opportunities in positions directly related to the field you might be interested.

Internship: Students enrolled in internship programs spend twelve to sixteen consecutive months in paid, full-time employment between their third and fourth years of study

Work experience programs – these may be offered through employment agencies, professional associations or educational institutions.
•Survival jobs – most new immigrants to Canada take an entry-level position in their profession, or a job outside their field, to pay their bills as they go through the certification process and look for the kind of job they want in their profession.

Register for academic bridging programs – these help new immigrants upgrade their skills or education without having to take a full diploma or degree program. For example, UoT University and the Ontario College of Teachers have a one-year program that helps internationally-trained teachers understand the Canadian education system

Get a Survival job – most new immigrants to Canada take an entry-level position in their profession, or a job outside their field, to pay their bills as they go through the certification process and look for the kind of job they want in their profession.

Important:  This information guide does not contain visa information. We recommend that you order one of the immigration guides listed  http://www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org or use our services for settllement available in Spanish, English and French . For detailed Canada citizenship, PR Cards, self help immigration documents and Canada visa information.

How to get a job in Canada

If your goal is to obtain a job offer with sponsorship for  work-visa, followed by permanent residency with a reputable company in your interested field, then here  are some career planning strategies that may help.

Canadian Employment Sponsorship now takes longer and a bit of paperwork., but each year Canada grants almost 90,000 work- visas.  According to  Canada immigration laws, international students with  visas are eligible to work full-time for one year after they graduate as part of their practical training. Upon completion of the practical training, international students must be sponsored by an employer to continue working in Canada.

 Employers must sponsor international students to obtain an work visa, which allows students to work in Canada for one to six additional years. International students planning to work fulltime after graduation in  Canada need to begin the job search process at least two semesters before graduation.

You will also need to become familiar with the Canadian job search process. The key to landing a job is diligence and developing an aggressive job search strategy to increase your chances of finding a good job in Canada. As it’s true that international students have some disadvantages when entering the job market.

Not mastering the official languages can be a serious obstacle. Social skills can also be a problem. A lack of relevant work experience while in school. These factors make it tough to compete in today’s job market. To increase your chances of finding a good job, consider the following advice.

• Improve your language skills. Hire a tutor or take an English or French course. Take advantage of a mock interview offered by the Career Center to develop effective interview and communication skills. Verbal and
written English or French  skills are essential to securing employment in Canada.

• Consider acquiring a major/specialization in demand that will increase chances of employment in  Canada.
According to Canada immigration , employment  petitions were approved in the following areas: Such fields include Systems Analysis and Programming (47.4%), Health (Medical)  and Electrical/Electronics Engineering (5.4%), College and University Education (4.1%), and Accountants and Related Finantial Occupations (3.7%)

 • Network at job fairs and recruiting events. Talk with a career counselor, faculty and friends. Develop networks and resources through local ethnic communities, nationality clubs, and classmates, business owners from your home country, your consulate, embassy, social organizations, advocacy groups, and professors from the same home country. Contact the alumni office to connect with alums from your homeland.

Join professional organizations and associations specific to the type of job you want or related to your field of interest. If you worked professionally in your homeland, network with the Canadian affiliate or a competitor of that organization. Search for global organizations desiring language skills, diversity, and knowledge of overseas economies. We offer an  available the Directory of Canadian business Operating in Foreign Countries. Networking is a great way to develop social skills.

Learn customary professional business and dining etiquette skills. Attend the Professional Etiquette Dinner hosted by the Career Center.

• If you are already in Canada check out the resources of a Career Center such as recruiting events, career fairs and employer information sessions held throughout the year. Meet with a career specialist. Participate in the Canadian Cultural Career Network Program.

• Sell yourself to the employer with an effective resume, cover letter and interviewing skills that
highlight what the employer is looking for. Make sure you know and emphasize your relevant strengths and skills in addition to your qualifications. Show how you can add value and benefit the organization. Develop marketable skills through part-time jobs, internships, graduate assistantships, student organizations and volunteer activities. Highlight those marketable skills on your resume and cover letter.

• Obtain an internship to gain experience in the field and a better understanding of your profession. Think about searching for companies from your homeland that have operations in Canada. Learn about Canadian companies where your peers have interviewed, interned or are working full-time. Consider an international internship. See the Study Abroad Coordinator in the Office of  International Studies and Programs. Meet with your departmental internship coordinator for opportunities. Check company websites. Check opportunities offered by other schools. Seek out companies that have a history of employment  sponsorship. Approximately 50% of interns receive a job offer from the sponsoring Canadian company after they complete an internship.

• Employment agencies provide permanent employment opportunities or staffing services offer temporary or contract placement as an option.

•  Some internet sites can be a valuable resource tool for job hunting. Consider local Canadian  jobs.

• Discussions about Employment  sponsorship should come later when the employer brings it up or when the applicant is offered employment. Uncover those companies that relate to your field of study and are of interest to you. It will be important to become very familiar with your industry, the companies within the industry, and positions available within those companies. Focus your job search on Canadian companies that prefer to hire international professionals. Search both small and large companies and compile a list of 50 Canadian  companies of interest. Studies have shown that about 80% of job openings are filled by employers without having a need to advertise their jobs. This is known as the “hidden job market.” Find a contact within the organization to
inquire and apply to jobs within the organization. The key is to have your resume with the hiring manager before a job is advertised.

Make appropriate follow-ups as needed to confirm your interest. These career planning strategies will help international students better prepare for the job search. After all, your priority is to obtain employment with sponsorship for  employment  followed by permanent residency with a reputable company in your interested field!

Canadian Government Job Sites

BC Government Job Postings
http://www.postings.gov.bc.ca/

Alberta Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.ab.ca/pao/jobs/

Saskatchewan Government Job Postings
http://www.careers.gov.sk.ca/

Manitoba Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.mb.ca/csc/

Ontario Government Job Postings
http://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/

Quebec Government Job Postings
http://www.tresor.gouv.qc.ca/resource/emplois.htm

 Nova Scotia Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.ns.ca/psc/services/employ/

New Brunswick Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.nb.ca/scripts/search/competition.idq?TextRestriction=&FMMod=-6m

Prince Edward Island Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.pe.ca/jobs/index.php3

Newfoundland & Labrador Government Job Postings
http://www.gov.nf.ca/psc/employment.htm

Federal Government Job Postings
http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/

 

Nongovernment Job Sites
+Canada Jobs
http://www.canada.plusjobs.com/

OPTION-carriere.ca
http://www.option-carriere.ca/

AboutJobs
http://aboutjobs.com/

“About.com” Job Searching
http://jobsearchtech.about.com/
careers/jobsearchtech/msub8.htm

Actijob/ActivEmploi
http://www.actijob.com/

All Canadian Jobs
http://www.allcanadianjobs.com/

Atlanticjobs.com
http://www.atlanticjobs.com/

BC WorkInfoNet
http://workinfonet.bc.ca/

British Columbia Hi Tech.
http://www.bctechnology.com/frameset_emp.html

Calgary Career Site
http://www.allstarjobs.ca

CallCareers.com Canada
http://www.callcareers.com/

Campus WorkLink
http://www.campusworklink.com/

Canada Online Job Search Guide
http://www.canadajobsearch.com/

CanadaIT.com
http://www.canadait.com/cfm/index.cfm

Canada Job Links
http://www.job-link.ca/

Canada Work Info Net
http://www.workinfonet.ca/

Canadian Career Page
http://www.canadiancareers.com/

Canadian Jobs
http://www.canadajobs.com/

Canadian Jobs : Canada Employment Weekly
http://www.mediacorp2.com/index.html

Career.com
http://www.career.com/

Careerclick.com
http://www.careerclick.com

CareerExchange
http://www.careerexchange.com/

CareerMosaic Canada
http://www.headhunter.net/jobseeker/
jobs/jobfindica.asp?ch=ICA

CareerTips
http://www.careertips.com/

Careertransit.com, Atlantic Canada’s Job Site
http://www.careertransit.com/

Career Edge
http://www.careeredge.on.ca/

Career Internetworking
http://www.careerkey.com/

Career Magazine
http://www.careermag.com/

Career Owl
http://www.careerowl.ca/

Career Studio
http://www.ola.bc.ca/careerstudio/

Charity Careeers
http://www.charitycareers.com/

CRS Major Canadian Companies, HR Departments
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
canjobs.html

CRS Career Channel
http://www.careermag.com/crs/

CRS Cities: HR Departments
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
cityjobs.html

Dice.com
http://www.dice.com/

Education Canada Network
http://www.educationcanada.com/

Employment Opportunities In The Space Industry
http://www.spacejobs.com/index.shtml

Environmental Jobs and Careers
http://www.ejobs.org/
 Financial Job Network
http://www.financialjobnet.com/

Forestry Employment Bulletin Board
http://www.canadian-forests.com/
job.html

Futurestep
http://www.futurestep.com/

Globecareers
www.globecareers.com

Hamilton-Wentworth Employer Directory
http://www.pichamilton.net/

Hotjobs.ca
http://www.hotjobs.ca/

“Human Resources Canada” Offices in CRS Cities
http://www.relocatecanada.com/
humanresourcescanada.html

Human Resources Development Canada
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/

“Job Bank” Human Resources Canada
http://jb-ge.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/

JobLink at Icdirect
http://www.icdirect.com/cgi-bin/getHTML.exe/www/0/0/jl?fhttpFile=/www/joblink.html

Jobs Canada
http://www.jobscanada.com/

Jobs in Canada with Jobrapido
http://www.job-rapido.ca/?q=canada

Jobs for Physicists and Engineers by PhysLINK.com
http://www.physlink.com/Community/JobBoard.cfm

JobFindCentral
http://www.jobfindcentral.com/

Jobs.ca
www.jobs.ca

Jobshark.ca
www.jobshark.ca

Mazemaster
http://www.mazemaster.on.ca/

MedHunters.com, Healthcare Jobs
http://www.medhunters.com/

Meta-list of On-Line Job-Search Resources and Services
http://www.job-hunt.org/index.html

Misconsult
http://www.misconsult.com/

Monster.ca, Career Center
http://www.monster.ca/

MultiMediator – Canada’s Multimedia Guide
http://www.multimediator.com/

National Association of Career Colleges
http://www.nacc.ca/

Nextsteps
http://www.nextsteps.org/

Positionwatch, IT Positions
http://www.positionwatch.com/

Quinte Region (ON), Job Resources
http://www.quinte.on.ca/sites/employ.htm

Resort Jobs Database – Canada
http://www.resortjobs.com/do/where/jobtree/Canada/

Seasonal Employment.com
http://www.seasonalemployment.com/canada.html

Student Employment Network
http://www.studentjobs.com/

Summer Jobs – Canada
http://www.summerjobs.com/do/where/jobtree/Canada/

Thingamajob
http://www.thingamajob.com/

Tiger Jobs
http://www.tigerjobs.com/rareas/

Toronto Computerwork.com
http://toronto.computerwork.com/

Vancouver insurance jobs
http://www.insuranceheadhunters.com/

WITI
http://www.witi.com/index-c.shtml

Worksearch
http://www.worksearch.gc.ca/

Workopolis, Mega Job Site
http://www.workopolis.com/

Job Recruiting Companies
Accu-Staff,Windsor
http://www.accu-staff.com/

Aerotek
http://www.aerotek.com/

AES Recruitment Advertising
http://www.aescompany.com/

The Agricultural Labour Pool
http://www.agri-labourpool.com/

Ajilon Canada, IT Careers
http://www.ajilon.ca/index.jsp

Anderson Executive Recruitment
http://www.andersoncareers.com/

Angus Miles
http://www.angusmiles.com/

Anne Whitten Bilingual
http://www.annewhitten.com/

Antiphon
http://www.antiphon.co.uk/

Black Appointments
http://www.blackapp.co.uk/

Bradson Staffing Services
http://www.spherion.com/

BrainsTalent.com, Recruitment
Advertising Innovators
http://www.brainstalent.com/

Canadian Executive Recruitment
http://www.cdnexec.net/

Canadian Medical Placement Service.
http://www.cmps.ca/

Canadian Recruiters and Directory of Recruiters
http://www.directoryofrecruiters.com/

Career Edge
http://www.careeredge.org

CCT Inc.
http://www.cctinc.org/

CEO, Inc.
http://www.ceoemp.com/

ComputerWork
http://www.computerwork.com/
 Conestoga Personnel Resources Inc.(CPR)
http://www.conestogapersonnel.com/

Cooljobscanada.com
http://www.cooljobscanada.com/

CRS Job Resources
http://www.relocatecanada.com/jobs2.html

Kelly Services
http://www.kellyservices.com/

Medical Recruiting Services
http://www.medicalrecruitingservices.ca

People Bank, The
http://www.thepeoplebank.com/

Personnel Management Group, Winnipeg Manitoba
http://www.pmg.mb.ca/

Pharma
http://www.pharma-career-box.com/

Planet Recruit Canada
http://www.planetrecruit.com/
channel/int/country/Canada/

Prior Resource Group – Kitchener Jobs, Waterloo Jobs
http://www.priorresource.com/

Quantum Technology Recruiting
http://www.quantum-qtr.com/

Recruiters Online Network
http://www.recruitersonline.com/

Red Seal Recruiting Solutions Ltd
http://www.redsealrecruiting.com/

Senior Quality Personnel
http://www2.pleaseapply.to/sqprecruiters/

Showbiz Jobs
http://www.showbizjobs.com/

TEKSystems
http://www.teksystems.com/

Titan Recruitment Solutions
http://www.titanrecruitment.com/

Total Staffing Solutions
http://www.totalstaff.ca/

TRS Contract Consulting Group
http://www.trscontract.com/

Western Canada’s Careers/Recruitment Web Site
http://www.tmp.com/

Yellow Pages List of Recruitment Agencies

Corporate Job Sites
Air Canada
http://www.aircanada.ca/about-us/employment/

Alcatel
http://www.alcatel.com/

Aquent
http://www.aquent.com/

AT&T Canada Careers
http://www.attcanada.com/careers/

BrassRing
http://www.brassring.com/

Canadian Tire
http://www2.canadiantire.ca/
CTCwebsite/welcome.html

CIBC
http://www.cibc.com/ca/inside-cibc/careers.html

Edward Jones
http://www.jonesopportunity.com/ca/

Ericsson
http://www.ericsson.com/careers/

FedEx
http://www.fedex.com/ca_english/
about/employment.html

Fluor Canada Ltd.
http://www.fluorcanada.ca/career_ops/career_ops.htm

Future Shop
http://www.futureshop.ca/companyinfo/careers/en/default.asp

Hewlett Packard
http://www.jobs.hp.com/

Home Depot
http://www.homedepot.ca/escalate/store/DisplayVisitor?pls=hd_canada_gift&page=content/static_Careers&loginPage=content/static_Careers

Hummingbird
http://www.hummingbird.com/jobs/

IBM
http://www.can.ibm.com/hr/

Indigo Inc.
http://chapters.indigo.ca/article.asp?artcode=careers

Loewen Windows
http://www.loewen.com/
 

Manulife
http://www.manulife.com/corporate/corporate2.nsf/Public/FrameSetCareersApplyNow.html

MedaGroup
http://www.medagroup.com/

Microsoft Canada
http://www.microsoft.com/canada/employment/

Motorola
http://www.motorola.ca/asp/english/excitingcareers/

Nortel
http://www.nortelnetworks.com/employment/

Oracle
http://www.oracle.com/ca-en/employment/

President’s Choice Financial
http://www.banking.pcfinancial.ca/en_ca/templates/about_us/we_are_hiring.jsp?referid=sideNav

Price Waterhouse Coopers
http://www.pricewaterhousecoopers.com/ca/eng/careers/main/index.html

Rona
http://www.careers.rona.ca

Royal Bank
http://www.rbc.com/uniquecareers/

Sears Canada
http://www.sears.ca/e/careers/index.htm

Staples
http://www.greatcareersatstaples.ca/default1.asp

Sun Life
http://www.sunlife.ca/canada/cda/level1_page_career_v2/0,2329,1-8,00.html

TD Bank
http://www.td.com/hr/index.jsp

Tim Hortons
http://www.timhortons.com/en/join/corporate.html

WestJet
http://c3dsp.westjet.com/guest/jobs/index.jsp;jsessionid=C1DDDhpk7aqpV0VG5UHCD7g355Q1CCcavAos4xVFH0Sc1t81Pw2M!1496531260

Yahoo! Canada
http://ca.yahoo.com/docs/info/jobs.html

Careerowlresources.ca

http://www.careerowlresources.ca/

Cost of Living Reports
http://www.relocatecanada.com/crseri.html

 

Jobs in Canada
http://www.jooble.ca

Ressourceschouettecarriere.ca
http://ressourceschouettecarriere.ca/

For other resources and workshops aimed at   career reinvention, jobs and  business,  contact  Reinvention consultancy  here