Archive for the ‘ Canada foreign worker- Summer, Seasonal and Short term jobs ’ Category

Work in Canada: The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program

•The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program (Quebec and British Columbia only);

Foreign individual (i.e., one who is not a Canadian permanent resident or citizen) who intends to work in Canada is typically required to possess a work permit or other authorization to legally do so. Such authorization may come in various forms, and often requires advanced approval prior to eligibility to enter Canada for work. Significant complexity may surround the process of securing the proper authorization to work in a foreign country.

The dynamic Information Technology (IT) Workers visa allows the fast-track processing of visa applications for skilled professionals in the software industry seeking to gain valuable Canadian work experience on a temporary basis. The Information Technology Work visa allows applicants with the required education and experience in the specified products or technologies applying for specific jobs to apply under this versatile program.

Applicants must be able to communicate in English or French, and provide evidence of sufficient experience in the specified IT industries and specified products or technologies. Once approved, applicants will be allowed to be issued a work permit following confirmation through Service Canada. This means that applicants can come to Canada quickly. Applicants are also eligible for work permit renewals.

MORE DETAILS

The Facilitated Processing of Information Technology Workers program was established through a collaboration of the Software Human Resources Council of Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and Citizenship and Immigration Canada as an effort to alleviate a shortage of software professionals in Canada. The requirement for a Labour Market Opinion application was removed for those professionals meeting the requirements of seven occupational definitions.

 The eligible occupations are:

•Senior Animation Effects Editor
•Multimedia Software Developer
•Embedded Systems Software Designer
•MIS Software Designer
•Software Products Developer
•Telecommunications Software Designer
•Software Developer – Services
The goal of the program continues to be to expedite the process of admitting foreign workers in the field of information technology. Eligible candidates are granted a “national confirmation” by HRSDC, and may proceed directly to applying for a Canadian work permit. As this program does not constitute a confirmation exemption, however, applicants with a destination in the province of Quebec are required to obtain a Certificate d’Acceptation du Quebec prior to a work permit.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WORKERS VISA REQUIREMENTS
Applicants for the Information Technology Workers visa must have an offer of employment for an eligible occupation from a Canadian employer which meets the following requirements:

•the wages and working conditions offered are commensurate for the position;
•the employer’s advertisement and recruitment efforts are sufficient;
•there is sufficient evidence of the labour market benefits related to the entry of the foreign worker;
•and whether the entry of the foreign worker is likely to affect the settlement of a labour dispute.
In order to apply for the Information Technology Workers visa, applicants must provide confirmation of possessing the required education and experience in the specified products or technologies required for the occupation. Applicants must also demonstrate proficiency in working in an English and/or French work environment.

 
Applications may be submitted to a Canadian visa office abroad or at a port of entry for those who are exempt from the requirement of a passport visa

 

PLEASE NOTE: This program terminated on September 30 2010 for most provinces. Other than Quebec and Brisitsh Columbia, cases submitted after this date will be subject to the requirement of a Labour Market Opinion. Foreign workers destined to Quebec and Brisitsh Columbia currently remain eligible for such applications

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

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Canada: Regulated Professions & Recognized Trades

Regulated Professions and Trades

Ontario has over 30 regulated professions – from architecture and engineering to social work and veterinary medicine. A licence is required to work in these fields in Ontario. Ontario also has more than 140 recognized trades, of which about 20 require mandatory certification.

A regulated occupation is one that is governed by a provincial, territorial or sometimes federal authority (for example: veterinarians, electricians and plumbers). Certain entry requirements and standards of practice are used to assess your qualifications and certify, register or license you as a qualified applicant. Requirements can vary from one province or territory to another. For a regulated occupation, you must have a licence, certificate or be registered with the regulatory body, before you start practising your trade or profession. Approximately 20% of professions or trades are regulated in Canada.

General information about professions and trades in Ontario:

1. Academic Credential Assessment  or Foreign Qualification Evaluation and Recognition in Canada.– Learn how to get your academic credentials assessed to Ontario’s standards.

World Education Services – Canada (WES-Canada)
45 Charles Street East, Suite 700
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 1S2
Tel: (416) 972-0070 (416) 972-0070     

Toll Free: 1-866-343-0070 1-866-343-0070      Fax: (416) 972-9004
Toll free: 1-800-937-3895 1-800-937-3895     

WES-Canada converts foreign secondary and post-secondary educational qualifications into their Ontario equivalents. Document-by-document, course-by-course or customized reports are available for educational, immigration, licensing or employment purposes. Services and assessment reports are available in English and French 

2. Bridging Programs – These programs help qualified professional immigrants move quickly into the labour market without duplicating what they have already learned.
3. Career Maps – The Ontario Government has developed career maps for most regulated professions and trades, which explain in detail every step of the certification process.

Apprenticeship and Occupational Certification – (New Brunswick)

http://www.canadabusiness.ca/eng/summary/3528/
Applies to: New Brunswick

For your business to prosper and grow in today’s changing world, a highly skilled and adaptable workforce is required. The most effective way to ensure you will have the best employees is through apprenticeship.
Office des professions du Québec – (Québec) (only available in French)

http://www.opq.gouv.qc.ca/index.php?id=18
This professional body enacts and applies various regulations that govern professional practice.
Trade School Registration – (Yukon)

http://www.canadabusiness.ca/eng/summary/5397/
Applies to: Yukon
To attract students to your trade school, you need to be registered with the Government of Yukon.

Non-Regulated Professions
A non-regulated profession does not require that you have a licence, certificate or registration before you practise (for example, engineering technician or commercial planner). Most occupations fall into this category. Some occupations allow you to register with a professional body or association on a voluntary basis.

 One of the best source of  a Canadian company information   is the its website. Why? because the company’s Website, it’s an absolutely amazing of info. You can either try directly entering the company name in your favorite browser.

Looking for work? One of  best source for conducting your initial Canadian’s  company research is Hineni’s  Database,  run by Hineni Media. Hineni’s database is a compilation of more than 500 host organizations with preexisting sponsoring and Co-ops placements  spanning over 85 areas of interest. Searchable by location, level of study, field and area of interest, it provides an excellent starting point for professionals searching for their ideal seasonal or permanent  job opportunity.  The database is a great place to start your search. Contact here or subscribe online  to access .

From there, I would locate the professional organizations for the given career. For example, if you were interested in marketing as a career, I would recommend contacting the Canadian Marketing Association to learn more about demanded careers in marketing. To get salary information for a specific geographic location, I would use one of the many salary calculators available online.

Do your research, polish your job-search materials, network, and go after a specific job. And be sure to follow-up each and every job lead — until you land that job.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

FINDING A JOB IN CANADA Occupations in Canada Non-Regulated fields(II)

 Regarding recognition questions there is a difference between academic and professional recognition. In Canada (as in most of the group8  countries) the higher education institutions are directly responsible for the academic recognition (admission, continuation of studies).

Credential recognition   or professional validation  is the recognition required to obtain the right to work in a certain field. Professional recognition differs between regulated and non-regulated professions. In the first case the authority in charge of the regulation of a certain profession must be determinable, as the authority regulating the education leading to a profession is also responsible for the recognition of foreign diplomas in this field. If the education or the right to work is not regulated, then the professional recognition lies solely within the responsibility of the employer. He or she decides whether the qualifications submitted by the candidate are adequate for the job in question. This applies both to Canadian and foreign nationals. However, the Federal Secretariat for Economic Affairs (feco) prescribes the quota regulations for foreign employees, which regulate the granting of work permits. Most self-employees working in non-regulated professions do not need professional recognition but it’s advisable. They are only dependent on the rules of the free market.

Some professions are not regulated but most of the professions in Canada are regulated. In other words, there are  prerequisites such as education, age, experience etc. to be met.

Regulated and Non-Regulated Professions and Occupations in Canada

About 20 per cent of Canadians jobs are “regulated occupations” that require individuals to be licensed, registered or certified before they can legally begin working. Regulated occupations are governed by a regulatory body or college that sets standards of practice, registers or licenses qualified applicants and disciplines members when necessary. The regulatory body is also responsible for assessing and evaluating the credentials of applicants.

Most health professions are governed by regulatory bodies. Some examples are doctors, dentists, nurses, dietitians, midwives, pharmacists, opticians, physiotherapists, naturopaths, psychologists and chiropractors.

Some examples of non-regulated professions include:

•Lawyers
•Accountants
•Architects
•Teachers
•Social Workers
•Veterinarians
•Funeral directors
 

The majority of jobs in Canada are “non-regulated occupations” that don’t require workers to be licensed or registered. Non-regulated occupations range from jobs requiring a lot of education and responsibility to little formal training. Some examples of non-regulated jobs are computer programmers, waiters, office managers, journalists, graphic designers and housekeepers.

Newcomers often choose to work in a non-regulated job while they become licensed in a regulated occupation. The Working in Canada Tool  can be used to determine if your occupation is regulated or non-regulated.

Recognized Trades
Workers must be certified to work in certain trades in Ontario; in other trades, certification is voluntary. Certification means you have passed a provincial examination and earned a Certificate of Qualification to work in a particular trade. Before writing the exam, you must prove that you have experience in the trade and provide a number of documents, including a Social Insurance Number (SIN) card, letters from previous employers or a current employer, letters from unions, certificates, diplomas, licences and official school transcripts.

Examples of certified trades include:

•Plumber
•Electrician
•Hairstylist
•Machinist
•Automotive service technician
•Sheet metal worker
 

Examples of trades in which certification is voluntary are: baker, painter, cabinetmaker, cement mason, chef, automotive painter, machine engine technician, locksmith, draftsperson, drywall finisher, powerline technician, roofer, educational assistant, early childhood educator and welder.

Many employers and unions ask for a Certificate of Qualification even though certification is voluntary. To apply for certification, contact the Employment Ontario Network in person, online, or by calling the toll-free line 1-800-387-5656 (TTY 1-866-768-1157). Service is available in 25 languages.

It is a good idea to join a Canadian professional or trade association in your field. These associations are a good source of information about jobs and other information related to your trade. Members are usually required to pay annual fees or dues.

What’s the best source of  Canadian company information ? The company’s Website, of course! It’s absolutely amazing what you can find published on company Websites. You can either try directly entering the company name in your favorite browser.

The best source for conducting your initial Canadian company research is Hineni Database,  published by Hineni Media. This database, updated annually, provides general information about types of jobs within a large number of occupations; the outlook for job growth; working conditions; average earnings; education and training required; related occupations specially for internationally trained professionals; and sources for finding more information. The  database’s content   is an ideal  place to start your  Canadian search.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Finding Work in Canada

Looking for Work?
 

When it comes to finding a job in Canada, for some people it is as easy as visiting one of the major job portals (Monster, workopolis.com, cooljobscanada.com etc). For international workers, however, it is not as simple. More often than not, applying for a position listed on these web portals as an international worker is futile. Companies are looking for Canadians residents and/or citizens, and are not willing to wait for candidates to come to Canada to hire them.

Because we deal primarily with international workers, we often have to act as an intermediary on their behalf. We contact the employers, set up the virtual interviews, and another  take care of all of the processing and filing requirements to bring the workers to  Canada. Beyond even the language barrier, employers in Canada tend to be so bombarded by offers from other agencies, independant workers, and every-day walkins, that they rely on companies such as ourselves to screen workers and take care of the details.

For independant international workers, this process can tend to be much more complicated. How does one find an employer without working with a recruitment firm? Well, let’s find out!

Don’t Use This Method!    In Canada , Vancouver is our hospitality, Tourism and Temporary jobs kingdom. Then is BC , Quebec and lastly AB (Alberta)
 
Food Service Employers: Cooks, waitress, bartenders, chefs, banquet, bar staff, chefs, servers, hotel jobs, resort jobs, entry level, supervisory and management positions.

Check this example: Hospitality Employers Alternative Jobs

Step One: Resume
Your First Step should be to analyze your skill sets, and make a short resume or summary of qualifications. A resume for candidacy as an international or overseas worker is a bit different from the typical resume. It should answer the following questions:

•What is your name?
•How old are you?
•What types of jobs have you held?
•What type of positions are you interested in?
•What skills do you posess?
•What is your level of English or French? (Beginner, Intermediate, Fluent, Fluent-Professional)
•What kind of training/education do you posess?
•Have you ever visited/worked in Canada?
•What is your Contact information?
In the interest of time and paper cost, do your best to minimize the resume to one page, or two for more technical pursuits. This document is more of an introduction. Further information can be divulged at the interview stage (if the company requires an interview.

When choosing a job category, make sure that it is something that you are interested in, and qualified to do. Employers typically utilize international or overseas workers as a last result, or as a cost-cutting measure. If they are able to find a more qualified candidate for less/the same amount of money within their own country, they typically will go with that candidate. For unskilled jobs, a complete and exact work history is typically not as important as the skills a candidate may posess. For example, target your resume to match the job that you are interested in. For someone interested in working as a Cook/Chef, having “Cooking- 5 years” on a resume is a bigger help than showing prior work history as a accounter or financial analyst. Don’t get me wrong – a good work history is a great thing to have, but one can always risk looking overqualified for a job.
 

Step Two: Job Search
As in any job search, it is important for international trained candidates to set up a list of potential employers. Start with the best possible scenario – the highest paying employer in the province with the lowest cost of living. The last employer on your list should be the one with the lowest salary. This is to be a last result – simply a way to get your foot in the door.

Do you have a preferred location? Many people that have never been in Canada still have a place they have always wanted to visit, or a province that they had heard was beautiful. Our company is based in Toronto, which is often sought by candidates from candidates in the North and from Southern hemispheres. Some candidates enjoy larger cities, and focus their job search on British Columbia, Alberta, and Quebec. Candidates interested in saving money on the Cost of Living will often look for more inner cities or semi rural locales, including Kitchener (Cambridge, Waterloo), New Brunswick, PEI, and Saskatchewan.

Once you have settled on a location, go ahead and search for local and regional Job Search portals in the area. Some national sites such as Eluta, bestjobs.ca, workopolis, Jobsincanada and Monster can also be used as a reference point. As we mentioned, these types of resources do not make a good basis for a job search, as they are primarily targeted at Canadian based workers. Smaller Job Search Portals may be of more use, as they typically have more unskilled-labor types of positions.

Local and Regional newspapers often have an online classifieds section that can aid in a job search. Many employers are required by law to post advertisements in these periodicals prior to hiring international workers. Posts that are larger in size, and include the name of the company, number of jobs available, a reference number or Job ID, and instructions to send in a resume are generally very good indications that the company is either an employer, or a recruiter working for the employer. Take Notice, however: Applying for these positions will not get you the job – they are used as a measure to ensure that there are no domestic workers available to fill the position.  If you find a company such as this, search for their direct contact information via Linkedin or Google.

Another great way to find positions is to locate the corporate branch or management office of large chains. Examples are Tim Hortons, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, Dixie Lee Fried Chicken or Mary Brown’s Fried Chicken,  Theme & Amusement Parks like Marine Land in Niagara Falls, and others. Contact the Human Resources department, and request information about international recruitment. If they have a recruiter that they work with, contact them to learn more about the application process.

Step Three: Contact
When making contact with an employer, the first steps are crucial. If you are not sure about you English spelling and grammar, have a friend or colleague take a look at anything that you send out. Set up a letter that describes the position you are interested in, where you are from, and when you are wanting to come to Canada. Provide your contact information and an email address where you can easily be reached.

Don’t depend on every employer to answer you. If you get an answer from even one-fifth of the employers on your list, then you should feel fairly accomplished!

Start towards the middle of your list, and work your way up. It’s good to have some practice. After every attempt, your pitch and technique will be that much better. When you are ready to contact the employer at the top of your list, your will be at the top of your game! Save the employers towards the bottom of the list until later. It’s rare for international applicants but you don’t want a bunch of job offers from employers that you are not that interested in, only to turn them down. It is best to keep up a reputation with these companies for the future, in case things don’t work out with your favored employers.

If you will be making phone calls, write a short “script”. Make sure it is something that you will be comfortable reading, and that it will not sound ‘rehearsed’. This is only to be used as a reference. The last thing that you need is someone catching on that you’re reading your responses off of a piece of paper.

You need to have a resume ready. Companies  and Job Portals will often require a resume. Have one available in an electronic format for easy distribution. The electronic version should have little to no formatting (bold or italicized text, underlining, etc).

Final Preparation
If you have found an employer that has worked with international or overseas workers in the past, and can handle all of the processing and filing requirements, then you are good to go. If you are having trouble finding an employer, or find one that is not sure of how to proceed, sometimes it may be in your best interests to contact a international recruitment specialist or firm. International recruitment worker specialists are often freelancers that have dealt with international or overseas employment firms and/or staffing agencies, and choose to help candidates or employers on an individual basis. Larger firms have the manpower and the resources to take care of any needs that may arise, but often charge larger processing and filing fees.

When looking for help, make sure that the company you contact has experience in dealing with international or overseas  workers. The last thing you need is someone ‘winging it’ and causing your paperwork to be delayed or even denied.

Talk to the company representative, and see if they have a local affiliate in your country. Often this is a recruitment firm that has partnered with Canadians company, and can provide additional information. The rates with the affiliate may be a little higher, but it will be easier for you to get placed into a group of workers headed to Canada. This will help with processing times, and minimize the paperwork needed to get to Canada.

If you have any further trouble, feel free to contact us for a  consultation. Through our database we can help you find an employer, process the paperwork, and help with all of the processing and filing requirement with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) ;  LaborImmigration Canada, and other regulatory branches of the Canadian  Government.

Other than that, we wish you the best! Stay tuned for additional tutorials and guides!!

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media. 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Setting Up Shop – Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Ontario, Canada

Setting Up Shop – Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Toronto City
Most everyday Torontonians  depend of immigrant business for the services and goods they consume. they are the shopkeepers and street vendors, that keep the city humming, but these entrepreneurs face many challanges including language barriers , limitted acces to financing, and a lack of understanding of the rules of doing business in Toronto City and mostly Canada in general . Check their stories and hear what the experts  have to say about what can be done to helpe these business thrive.

Trabajo para extranjeros en Canada

No es fácil encontrar un trabajo ‘normal’ como extranjero en  Canada, pero hay algunos trabajos que te permiten financiar tu estadía en Canada.

Au pairing
Un ‘au pair’ es contratado para cuidar niños. El trato que ofrecen es alojamiento gratis, comida y una pequeña ayuda económica por ayudar con los niños y en ocasiones otras labores del hogar. La ventaja de este empleo es que practicas mucho el idioma, ya que estas en contacto diario con este.

Normalmente, no es requerido ningún tipo de aptitud especial y por lo mismo un au pair no debe ser estar al cuidado de niños menores a dos años. Las familias que aceptan un chico son raras, las experiencias con niños son sujetas a emisión de visa, ciudadanos de la UE y USA regularmente tienen ventaja. El servicio dura un mínimo de 2 meses y máximo de 3 años.

Requisitos y responsabilidades típicos

•conocimiento básico del idioma para comunicación con los niños desde el principio
•levantar y llevar a los niños para la escuela
•jugar con los niños
•preparar y darles sus alimentos
•limpiar sus cuartos y áreas de juego
•cuidado de ellos en las noches cuando salen los padres
Responsabilidades comunes de las familias

•dar un máximo de 25 – 35 horas de trabajo por semana
•dos días libres por semana
•no tratar al au pair como un sirviente doméstico no pagado
•dar su propia habitación
•pagar semalmente (unos CDN90)
•registrar al au pair con el doctor de la familia
•registrar al au pair en seguro de la casa
Las siguientes organizaciones relacionan au pairs con familias – estas suelen cobrar una cuota de registro a la familia y/o al au pair:

•IAPA (Asociación Internacional de Au Pair): www.iapa.org 
•IAPO (Organización Internacional de Au Pair):
www.au-pair.org 
•Au Pair info in Canada: Au Pair Canada

 Enseñanza de idioma extranjero
La enseñanza de tu idioma como idioma extranjero es un área donde puedes tener una ventaja en mercado laboral.  Frances , Español y Chino son idiomas con demanda alta. Conseguir empleo en el sistema de educación pública en Canada sule ser muy difícil, ya que solitan algunos requisitos( licencia y acreditacion) y el proceso de selección es competido (generalmente le ofrecen las vacantes a los canadienses).

Sin embargo, existen algunas escuelas de idiomas y agencias de prácticas que dan empleo a extranjeros. Algunos ni siquiera piden requisitos (como el TOEFL para el Inglés o Frances), pero depende de la institución. La poseer un certificado o título te da una ventaja. No hay requisitos para clases privadas.

La enseñanza de idiomas no es la mejor pagada con salarios muy variables. Clases privadas por sesión pagan unos $15-20/por hora, pero tienes que contemplar administración de estudiantes, agenda y viajes. Chequea en las escuelas de idiomas y universidades las oportunidades para dar clases o echa un vistazo en workopolis.com.

Trabajos temporales en la agricultura
Se estima que más de 35,000 extranjeros vienen a Canada cada año para ayudar en la temporada de trabajo intensivo como es la cosecha. La temporada de la frutas (manzanas, fresas, etc)  es de 4 a 5 semanas en Sepiembre/Octubre (dependiendo en tiempo y región), otras temparadas de frutas son de Abril hasta principios de Noviembre. Okanagan Valley  es muy famoso.

Es relativamente fácil obtener un permiso para realizar estos trabajos legalmente. El trabajo es duro y la paga es poca. Mucha gente regresa año tras año a los mismos lugares, así que puede difícil obtener un trabajo.

Industria turística
Hay muchas oportunidades en el sector turístico durante verano. Encontrar trabajo en Agosto, epecialmente en Vancouver, Montreal  y otros sitios llenos de turistas,suele ser fácil, ya también los Canadienses se van vacaciones. Los servicios más comunes para empleo son hoteles, restaurantes y otros sitios de comidas.

Dependiendo de la experiencia y aptitudes, los trabajos son: limpieza, mesero, cocinero, cajero y recepcionista. Los fáciles para encontrar empleo son las cadenas de comida rápida como McDonald’s, Subway, etc, ya que suelen estar siempre contratando personal. Las habilidades con el idioma te pueden ayudar en este país, dandote una ventaja competitiva sobre los Canadienses. En invierno, las oportunidades de trabajo se concentran en los centros de ski en Whistler y Vancouver Island and Victoria.

Prácticas estudiantiles
Las prácticas estudiantiles (Essays) o prácticas asignadas no son consideradas legalmente como trabajos, así que un permiso de trabajo (WTP) no es requerido. Mantienes tu estado de estudiante durante las prácticas profesionales. Un acuerdo de prácticas (internship) entre tu institución académica, la compañía y tu debe ser completada. En este se definen lo que estarás haciendo, horas de trabajo, condiciones así como cualquier remuneración.

 

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a business facilitator. She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

Canada Employer Database Info

Canada Employer Database
 Subscribers have access to the following Canada Employer Visa databases:
This is not a list of available jobs.
  • BUS-W – Business
  • CS-W – Computer Science
  • ENGR-W – Engineering

For access to these databases:
Send an e-mail to hinenisyndicator@gmail.com  with a subject of “Employers Visa Database Access.” In the body of the message, include your name and major.

It may take up to 48 hours to process your request.  You’ll choose from: The databases contain listings of employers who have recently filed the appropriate paperwork to sponsor an international person for an work  or employment-based visa. This is a starting point for you to determine which employers may be willing to sponsor your visa. There is no guarantee that this job will be available or that this employer will sponsor you.

I am a workforce professional, and I want to look up occupational data, find employer contact information, or help a customer find a job or get training.
 
I am a job seeker, and I want to find a job, research career options, get training, or find an employment office.
 
I am a Int’l student, and I want to choose an occupation or career field, look for a school or training provider, learn how to look for a job, or find information for a school report.
 

 Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a business facilitator. She  has been writing on legal research and Canada immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

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