How to have a succesful job hunt in Canada

Job hunting is tough for new immigrants in Canada

Canada, 9th September: As per the figures revealed by Statistics Canada, nearly two-thirds of new immigrants having university degrees are finding it difficult to get jobs in the chosen field so many have resorted to self-employment.   And this is especially true for immigrants who don’t have the required work experience in their related field.   In the event of being without jobs in Canada, many immigrants, especially newcomers are forced to work on part-time jobs or lower-paid jobs in Canada, the report by StatsCan maintains.  

Getting a job

1. Getting the Job – It’s not WHAT you know it’s WHO you know

 Getting jobs is all about who you know, not what you know.  Yes, networking and connections are probably the best way to go about getting a job and reflect the best use of time. But networking and who you know need to be combined with a strong sense of what kind of jobs to pursue.

 Getting a job in the business world can be easier if you know people and have a social network.   Although, Canada government has been trying to help new immigrants by offering various employment courses like S.U.C.C.E.S.S.( for instance in B.C.(British Columbia program for immigrants), however, still several immigrants have to struggle a lot before landing a job in Canada.   The fact is that many immigrants arriving in Canada and deciding to stay and work here possess requisite skills, professional or university degrees and have good proficiency in English, but that does not get them a job in the respective field so they resort to self employment or business of their own.   A immigrant from Argentina, Veronica Grigio has a university degree in the field of anthropology, but she is currently working at the Italian Cultural Centre as a receptionist. She intends to get further education in Vancouver University to improve her chances of getting a job in Canada in medical anthropology.   She is not alone. In fact, there are several doctors who are currently working as cabbies in Canada and many engineers who work as cleaners while those having degree in anthropology are seen working at low paid jobs in Canada.   No wonder, the average weekly wage for immigrant workers in the age group of 25-54 years happens to be $2.28 an hour while that of Canadian born workforce in the same age group is around $23.72 an hour.

2. Start Early  

The experts agree that networking is not a last-minute effort, relationships take time to cultivate.  Even if they already have a job, or are committing to school full time, students should still look for new contacts with people in their field.

3. Network Online  

Students and seasoned professionals should look to online networking sites like LinkedIn or Facebook to help establish contacts.   LinkedIn allows users to see different levels of connectivity to other people (whether you’re a second or third connection to someone), which can help students reach out to people more directly than cold calling.

4. Stay in Touch 

Establishing contacts takes work, and it is the person’s responsibility to keep connections going. Staying in touch with people by keeping them apprised of what you’re doing, what your interests are, what skills you have developed, and what jobs or opportunities you are looking for.

 

Attend business functions such as networking business breakfast meetings, lunches, cocktail mixers and the like. Carry LOTS of business cards and practice your elevator speech (a short intro of yourself and your chosen field of expertise).

Join the Chamber of Commerce, Better Business Bureau or other business related affiliation. Do you strive to be a freelancer? Join the Freelancer’s Union.

Keep checking  the newspaper for updated business listings, if someone got a promotion doing exactly what you would like to do, write them an email or a letter asking for advice or perhaps to setup a meeting and bring a writing tablet with you. They will most likely be very impressed that you had the gumption to put your best foot forward.

Remember, education is a great tool, but experience and knowing the right people is a must.

SUM UP?

Company want lots diplomas, experience, skills but they do not want to pay.

Getting jobs is all about who you know, not what you know. I have a friend who has 1 yr entry-level experience in a Colombian newspaper company, and she applied for an entry-level position at famous Toronto newspaper, and wasn’t even shortlisted for a phone interview (first step before in-person interview). I have another friend who barely passed undergrad, has no relevant work experience (just a couple of weak co-op terms), and got a job in that newspaper! right after graduation.
 

Jobs are not getting filled because Canadian companies are asking for the moon in qualifications and then those they do hire with those qualifications show they cannot do the job. They have not experience. Theory is one thing, putting it into practice is another. Canada is losing productivity because they are letting experienced people sit on the sidelines because they don’t have X,Y, or Z degrees. Some of the brghtest minds and richest people in the world don’t have degrees.  Doesn’t stop them from thinking and being creative and functioning well.  (we are not putting down highter education with this)  but education is not necessarily  a stepping stone to  a job.  Canadian companies need to smarten up or get lost in the rest of the world’s dust in the global marketplace.

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