Creating Jobs and Wealth for Canadians

Profit From Your Canadian Immigrant Advantage

7 reasons it makes sense for you to pursue your entrepreneurial dream — today!

I know the idea can be intim­i­dat­ing. I started my last com­pany, a suc­cess­ful media ven­ture, as an immi­grant from the US. Although I spoke Eng­lish, I found many aspects of doing busi­ness in Canada  dif­fer­ent than in my home coun­try. It took me a while to real­ize that I had an edge that many immi­grants share. I call it Your Immi­grant Advan­tage.

Because I was new to this coun­try and get­ting to know it for the first time, I real­ized I could see oppor­tu­ni­ties that Canadians might over­look. Taking business administration training, I ulti­mately built a busi­ness in an untapped niche of the media. I closed it after two years and am excited to fol­low up with this new ven­ture, a long held dream for me.

You might won­der if now is a good time to start a busi­ness in Canada. There’s no deny­ing that an eco­nomic down­turn is going to bring chal­lenges to any busi­ness. But entrust­ing your future secu­rity to an employer that could lay you off at any moment can be just as risky. Start­ing a busi­ness, in con­trast, can bring you con­trol of your des­tiny and a chance to build sig­nif­i­cant wealth.

Here are seven rea­sons it makes sense to start a busi­ness in Canada.

1. There’s startup money out there. Even in a tight lend­ing cli­mate, it is pos­si­ble to find fund­ing in Canada.  Many Canada entre­pre­neurs get their start in busi­ness by bor­row­ing money from friends and fam­ily or sell­ing a small stake in a bud­ding ven­ture to an out­side investor. Even those who don’t have a rich uncle can join the proud legions of entre­pre­neurs who have “boot­strapped” their com­pa­nies from day one, fund­ing any growth from the sales they make.

2. Red tape.  Canada is not a far eas­ier place to start a busi­ness than almost any­where else. but, for instance, you can incor­po­rate in a few days. Canada has a bit of European lifestyle, if you do’t know your way around  bureau­cracy can squash the entre­pre­neur­ial spirit. You need a per­mit for every­thing you do.

3. Smart Labor Code . They tend to be employer friendly, for the most part, and are not as puni­tive in Euro­pean coun­tries if you need to let peo­ple go.  In Canada, there is much less flex­i­bil­ity for the busi­ness owner to react to chang­ing mar­ket conditions.

4. Less cor­rup­tion. If you have been frus­trated by a busi­ness cul­ture where pay­ing bribes is required to get things done, you may be relieved to know that laws against bribery in  Canada gen­er­ally get enforced.

5. Things work. Many  Canadians take it for granted that there is a robust, inde­pen­dent legal sys­tem; reli­able and cost effi­cient trans­porta­tion; a reli­able power infra­struc­ture; and an out­stand­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tions net­work. If you’ve lived in a coun­try where these things are not the norm, I am cer­tain you will appre­ci­ate how much they add to the ease of doing business.

6. An out­stand­ing tal­ent pool. The Canadian  uni­ver­sity sys­tem  offers a world-class edu­ca­tion – and has the work­force to match.

7. There’s no shame in upward mobil­ity. This is an entre­pre­neur­ial cul­ture that rewards inno­va­tion – and new­com­ers can join it quickly if they speak the lan­guage. Why not start pur­su­ing your Canadian dream today? I’d like to help you, by pro­vid­ing training   and  use­ful tips and inspi­ra­tion from other entre­pre­neur­ial immigrants.

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