Archive for March, 2012

Other Canada/Canadian Job and Career Resources

Canada/Canadian Job and Career Resources
 

If you are looking for employment anywhere in Canada, these are the Canadian job sites you need to visit to help you in your job search.
 AllStarJobs.ca — for job-seekers searching for jobs in Canada, where you can search for job listings (by job category, province, or keywords), post your resume, and find links to all the best career resources for Canadian students and job-seekers. Free to job-seekers.

 Anne Whitten Bilingual Human Resources, Inc. — placement firm located in Toronto, Canada, specializing in English/French bilingual employment. Features a Hot List of available jobs.

 basejobs.com — a Canadian job site, where job-seekers can browse jobs by industry or location (or conducted an advanced keyword search), as well as post your resume and register for a job-matching service. No cost to job-seekers.

 BCjobs.ca — a job site specifically for job-seekers looking for employment in British Columbia. Job-seekers can search job listings (by category, employer, region, or keywords) and post your resume (up to 3 versions). Other options include email job alert, resume confidentiality, and more. Free to job-seekers.

 BCJobs.com — where job-seekers searching for jobs in British Columbia, Canada, can search job listings (by keyword, industry, employment type) as well as post your resume. Free to job-seekers.

 Best Jobs Canada — where job-seekers searching for jobs throughout Canada can search (by location, category, or keywords) or browse job listings, post your resume, and register for a job-search agent. Free to job-seekers.

 Campus Access — a Canadian site geared toward helping Canadians with your job and career needs. Includes a virtual career center, a jobs database, and online experts ready to answer your questions. Also has an internships database. Also includes resources for graduate and professional school application and financial aid information.

 Canada Jobs — from iJive.com, where Canadian job-seekers can enter your city or Province to find employers, employment agencies, job banks and career resources that are in your area. Also includes links to other Canadian job sites, employment agecnies, and career resources. Free to job-seekers.

 Canadian Bilingual Jobs — where Canadian bilingual-speaking job-seekers (French, Spanish, Mandarin, and Cantonese with English) can search job listings (by territory, job category, and salary), as well as submit your resume. Free to job-seekers.

 Canadian Career Page — a site devoted to helping Canadians find jobs or researdch careers. Includes a Canadian jobs database, a career site of the day, and a large collection of links. Free.

 Canadian Newspaper “Help Wanted” Ads — a great collection of Canadian newspapers that post daily online job want ads, organized by city. From the WORK Place, a one-stop labor market information resource from Human Resources Development Canada. Free to job-seekers.

 CanadasBestJobs.com — where job-seekers seeking a job in Canada can browse job listings by province and apply directly. Also includes an email job alert program. No cost to job-seekers.

 Canada’s Healthcare Career Network — a Canadian niche job board specializing in the Healthcare, Nursing and Biotech industries, where job-seekers can search job postings (by location, position, experience level, keywords), post your resume, find information on healthcare career fairs, and review career news and links. No cost to job-seekers.

 canadajobfishing.com — a Canadian career and job resources site, where job-seekers can search for jobs (by keyword, job type, and location), as well as post your resume. Also includes some job-hunting tips. No cost to job-seekers.

 canjobs.com — a great Canadian jobs site, where job-seekers can search job listings (by career type, province, and keywords), as well as post your resume, register for a job-search agent, and find career resources. Canjobs.com also runs province-specific and city-specific job sites for all of Canada. Registration required. Free to job-seekers.

 Careerclick.com — specializing in employment in Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Vancouver, and Windsor, where job-seekers can search jobs database, place your resume online, and received job alerts via email Free to job-seekers.

 Careerjet.ca — a job-search engine for Canadian job-seekers, where you can search job postings gathered from almost 60,000 Websites (by keywords, location, industry) or browse listings by industry or location. No cost to job-seekers.

 Destinations — specializes in placing qualified candidates — those currently receiving assistance from the government — in jobs in tourism and tourism-related industries in British Columbia, Canada. Works in conjunction with the Ministry of Human Resources. Free to job-seekers.

 DiversityCanada.com — a job site specifically designed to bring employers who have career opportunities together with Aboriginal peoples, people with disabilities, women and visible minorities. Job-seekers can browse job listings and post your resume. No cost to job-seekers.

 The Education Canada Network — developed as a one-stop portal for education professionals — teachers, administrators, education specialists, and support staff — this site is a great source of education employment opportunities in all provinces. Job-seekers can search or browse jobs, post your resume, and receive customized employment emails. Free to job-seekers.

 Eluta — a job-search engine for Canada that seeks out new job announcements with employers across Canada. Job-seekers can search job listings (by keywords or location) or browse by locations or occupations. No cost to job-seekers.

 Employment News — providing information about job opportunities in the Ontario, Canada, area — both in print and online. Also includes information on job fairs, career training, and job-hunting related articles. Free to job-seekers.

 Environmental Careers Organization: ECO Canada — a job board for Canadian environmental practitioners, where job-seekers can search for jobs, post your resume, and get certified. Students can learn about careers and educational opportunities. Membership is required to do just about anything on the site. No cost to job-seekers.

 Extremejobs.ca — a Canadian job site, where job-seekers can browse or search (by keyword, location, and job category) job listings. Also includes resume and other career tips and resources. No cost to job-seekers.

 Human Resources Development Canada — simply a fantastic one-stop site for Canadian job-seekers looking for any and all employment-related resources and links. Includes resources for persons with disabilities, children and youth, aboriginal peoples, seniors, entrepreneurs, and more. Also includes training and labor law resources. Free to job-seekers.

 Indeed.ca — a job-search engine for Canadian job-seekers where you can search job listings (by keywords, location) from major job boards, newspapers, associations, and company career pages. You can also save your searches and have jobs delivered to you by email alert or RSS feed. No cost to job-seekers.

 Jeff Gaulin’s Canadian Journalism Job Board — where job-seekers can browse journalism and communications job postings from newspapers, magazines, television and radio stations, wire services, Websites, and public and private organizations. Free to job-seekers.

 Jobboom — a really cool Canadian job and career site, where job-seekers can search for job listings (by expertise, title, location, and more), post your resume, and receive email job-match alerts — as well as find a career resources index and more. No cost to job-seekers.

 Job Bus Canada — strives to be the starting point for anyone looking for work in Canada. Job-seekers will find links to company and industry career centers, organized by job/industry categories. Also includes a nice collection of career resources and recommended sites. Free to job-seekers.

 jobhawk.com — a Canadian job site, where job-seekers can search job listings (by keyword, location, job type), as well as post up to 10 versions of your resume. Includes small selection of career resources. No cost to job-seekers.

 JobLineCanada.com — where job-seekers searching for jobs in Canada can search listings by type (senior level, intermediate level, entry level, and student/summer). You can also search by job category, location, and keyword, as well as post your resume. Free to job-seekers.

 JobLoft.com — a Canadian job site for the retail, food, and hospitality industries, in which job-seekers can search for job listings (by keyword, location, job title), research company profiles, download applications, and apply online to positions. No cost to job-seekers.

 JobsGTA — a job site for job-seekers searching for jobs in the greater Toronto (Canada) job market. Job-seekers can browse job listings, post your resume, and register for an email job-matching service. Also includes a Toronto recruiter directory. No cost to job-seekers.

 Make a Future: Careers in BC Education — a job board for job seekers looking to find jobs or career information about British Columbia’s public education sector from K-12. The site offers information about how to become a teacher, the 60 school districts across the province, and the teaching, management and support jobs that are currently available in each school district. No cost to job-seekers.

 Maplejobs.com — provides a search engine that indexes only career pages of Canadian companies or foreign companies that employ Canadians. Job-seekers can browse job listings, post your resume, and get a free email address for job-hunting. Parent site of a family of Canadian job sites. No cost to job-seekers.

 Media Job Search Canada — a great resource for communications and media professionals searching for a job in Canada. Find current job opportunities or browse through a directory of television, radio, film, print, multimedia, and advertising companies. Free to job-seekers.

 

 nextSteps.org — a full-featured employment, career development, and job finding resources for youth. Includes a monthly ezine that features a specific industry in each issue. Free. From the Youth Employment Centre of Canada.

 Now-Hiring.ca — a Canadian job site for Calgary — and growing to include all of Canada — where job-seekers can browse job listings by industry or location as well as post your resume. No cost to job-seekers.

 Ontario Job Watcher — a unique job site that focuses on job postings for the Ontario, Canada, job market that are gathered only from corporate Websites. Job-seekers can search listings or register for a job-watcher alert. Subscription fee charged.

 SaskNetWork — for job-seekers (and students) searching for jobs in Saskatchewan, Canada, where you will find lots of great resources to help move your career forward. Search for job listings (by job category and location), post your resume, and get job listing updates by phone. Also includes links to other job sources for Saskatchewan residents. No cost to job-seekers.

 SuperJobs.net — a bilingual job site, where job-seekers can browse or search job postings for the United States and Canada, as well as submit your resume for potential employers to review. Free to job-seekers.

 TheJobNetwork.ca — where job-seekers can find five Canadian job-search sites, including Now-Hiring.ca, JobSolutions.ca, Help Wanted Alberta, WeAreHiring.ca, and Jobs in Calgary. You can search jobs listings, post your resume, and register for job-search agent. No cost to job-seekers.

 TorontoJobClassifieds.com — an on-line service for job-seekers in seeking employment in the greater Toronto area (including Durham, Peel, Halton, Simcoe and York), where you can browse job listings by industry classifications. Also includes a great collection of links to career resources, salary information, career fairs, and relocating to the area. No cost to job-seekers.

 TorontoJobs.ca — a great job site for job-seekers searching for jobs in the greater Toronto area. Job-seekers can search for jobs (by job category, location, salary, and posting date), use a meta job-search tool to search for Toronto job listing posted on other job sites, post your resume, register for a job email notification service, and find links to career resources. Free to job-seekers.

 Youth Resource Network of Canada — a very nice source of information and links (in both English and French) designed for Canadian youth.

 West End Jobs — a job site for job-seekers in the West End of Metro Toronto. The site has job listings for the areas of Mississauga, Brampton, Etobicoke, Oakville, Georgetown, Caledon, Bolton, Orangeville, North York, Woodbridge, and Vaughn — where you can search for jobs or register for job alerts. No cost to job-seekers.

 

 Wow!Jobs — a Canadian job site claiming to be that country’s largest job-search engine, where job-seekers can browse or search (by keywords and location) more than 100,000 job listings across Canada advertised on more than 100 job boards and corporate sites, as well as register for email job alerts. No cost to job-seekers.

Obviously no mention of Workolis or Monster as they are not giving results.

Canada Provincial Immigrant Nominee Programs

Immigration remains a federal responsibility, but agreements with Ottawa allow provinces to nominate candidates who want to invest and run a business for accelerated immigration. Here are the requirements for entrepreneurs applying under provincial nominee programs:

Alberta

No specific entrepreneur category, but the nominee program includes a self-employed farmer category, for those able to invest at least $500,000 in a farming operation.

British Columbia

Applicants must show that they can develop and actively manage a business that will provide significant economic benefits to the province. Excluded businesses include coin laundries, payday loan offices and home-based businesses.

Saskatchewan

Entrepreneur applicants must have at least three years of entrepreneurial or relevant business management experience and a verifiable minimum net worth of $300,000, and ability to invest at least $150,000. A $75,000 refundable deposit is required.

Manitoba

Applicants must have three years of successful experience in senior management, have a minimum net worth of $350,000, and the ability to invest at least $150,000. An exploratory visit for a week to Manitoba is required along with a $75,000 cash deposit to guarantee establishment of a business in the province.

Ontario

A business investment component of Opportunities Ontario’s nominee program requires a minimum $3-million to invest in a new or existing business, and business ownership or management experience. Applicants must have a comprehensive business plan that creates at least five permanent full-time jobs and be actively involved in the day-to-day management of the business.

New Brunswick

Applicant must demonstrate business ownership or senior management experience, have good knowledge of English and/or French, a minimum net worth of $300,000, and have a minimum of $125,000 to invest in a new business. A five-day exploratory visit is required before applying, and a comprehensive business proposal and deposit of $75,000 is required if approved.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Applicant must have a minimum of five years of senior management or entrepreneurial experience and a minimum net worth of $450,000, of which at least $350,000 should be in liquid assets. A Performance Agreement must be signed, promising a minimum business investment of $200,000 in a new or existing business. An exploratory visit to the province, a business plan and a deposit of $100,000 is required.

Nova Scotia

No specific entrepreneur immigration category. A provincial program provides loans to help immigrants start businesses after they immigrate.

Quebec

Applicants must prove they have a net worth of $300,000, and a minimum of two years recent experience running a business on a day-to-day basis. They must have a working knowledge of French and create a business or partnership in Quebec with an equity of at least $100,000, which employs a Quebec resident who is not a family member.

Prince Edward Island

The island’s immigrant entrepreneur nominee program has been temporarily suspended because of a federal investigation. The program required immigrants to have a minimum net worth of $400,000, and be prepared to make a minimum business investment of $200,000 to establish a new enterprise. A complete business plan and a refundable deposit of $100,000 are to be submitted along with the application.

Yukon

Applicants must have a minimum net worth of $250,000, with a minimum of $150,000 to invest in a new business or an existing one, leading to equity ownership of at least one-third of the business. The applicant will manage day to day. Applicants must make an exploratory trip to Yukon to meet with officials and demonstrate reasonable skills in one of Canada’s official languages and show a minimum of five years of senior management or entrepreneurial experience.

Courtesy of  the Globe and Mail

Relocate in Canada

An iconic vista  

Canada’s first immigrants may have been reluctant European outcasts, destined for a lifetime of hard labour, but today this vast country lures 15,000 people annually from the UK alone.

Of the more 15,000 foreigners granted permanent visas to live in Canada in 2009,  many — just under a sixth — were British. Many of these hopefuls arrive to set up in business for themselves in search of the famed Canadian “Dream”, scenery and quality of life.

Similar business culture

With property prices — including commercial property — and other living costs significantly lower, it’s no wonder the country is so popular with foreigners.

Canada is an affluent country with a stable economy and strong links to the UK, making it a more significant market for the UK than its comparatively small population of 38 million might suggest. With an economy worth over 450bn, it’s a prime location for business immigrants.

The advantages of a shared language, a common basis for commercial law, a similar business culture and the presence of many USA and  UK companies in the market make  Canada  hugely accessible to the fledgling and experienced exporter alike.    Admittedly there isn’t anywhere on the planet  closer to the polar circle  with britons or british linkage  than Canada, but the geographical gap between the countries has been bridged by technological advances. The emergence of the internet and related technologies such as Voice-over-Internet phones, as well as video conferencing technology, have made doing business between the countries a lot easier.

The cost of long-haul flying is on a long-term downward trend, too, and the number of flights between the countries is on the increase thanks to the lifting of restrictions on code-sharing in 2009.

Business broker  Luz Maria, who has 30 years’ experience selling businesses in Canada, has some advice for foreign relocating their business the great white north:

“Continue in the same field and don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Business here has adopted a very British system and North American system there’s a chance you’ll introduce some new ideas to the local scene.”

Vibrant, cosmopolitan

Canada is a huge country (more than 20 times the size of the UK) with most people living in one of the major cities and three quarters of the population living in centres of 20,000 or more, making the market easily identifiable. The principal cities of  Toronto and Vancouver are large by international standards, with populations of 2.3 million and 3.8 million respectively. The capital, Ottawa, has a population of just 130,000, although it is in the midst of a record-breaking construction boom.

Canada’s cities are vibrant, cosmopolitan places thanks to waves of post-war immigration from central and southern Europe and south-east Asia. Creative and media, food and drink, recreation and leisure industries thrive.

Other prime sectors in the country are agriculture, mining, oil and gas, telecommunications, biotechnology and railways. With most of  Canada’s population living within 20km of the sea, it is a significant player in marine industries.    Western Canada, whose biggest city is vancouver, is Canada’s largest province, covering the most resource-laden third of the country. As close to China and Singapore as it is to Sydney, it is ideally equipped to service the growing economies of Asia and the Indian Ocean rim. It is also well placed for air travel, freight networks, shipping lines and telecommunications, and the state is home to Ernst & Young, Coopers & Lybrand and many other key international businesses.

The comparatively sparsely populated regions of the Northern Territoritories, Regina, Winnipeg, Calgary, Montreal are home to numerous lucrative industries, including offshore gas exploration, mining, farming, fishing and tourism, but they are still ripe for investment as most migrants head for the economically strong cities.

The tourist trade should be highly attractive to the business migrant as Canada’s rich aboriginal culture and stunning natural beauty continues to draw in over a million visitors a year. HC feels that the best business move for an individual looking for a lifestyle change would be in this industry.

“I would recommend a tourism and/or accommodation business — motel or B&B — where you normally get the housing with the business. “This makes the start in a new country much easier and you start interacting with the travellers and local community immediately.”   If you want to live in Canada and set up a business, or manage a new or established business, you will need to apply for a business skills visa. It is advisable to seek assistance from an agent before making your application, as competition is fierce.

“Under the country’s two-stage arrangements, business immigrants are granted now a provisional four-year visa and, after meeting the requisite level of achievement or maintaining their eligible investment, they are deemed fit to make an application for a residence visa. Applicants for provisional visas must have had a successful business career to date and significant net assets to settle in Canada.

For the second stage residence visa, business people must have had ownership interest in one actively operating business in Canada for at least two years, employ at least two Canada citizens and have achieved a decent annual turnover.

 

 

Marisol Diaz is  Business developer and  trainer specializing in  helping clients create fulfilling and meaningful business opportunities (or bizopp); business ideas and career opportunities trained professionals. Get help creating your own exciting  opportunity in Canada with a step-by-step books and  guides, seminars and Workshops such as “Steps to Starting Your Own Business” in Canada. Check also   Business, Jobs & Careers    products