Career Transition Advice for Canadian Immigrants

Helping people find their true calling

As a trained professional , you have made many personal and professional sacrifices to end up where you are today.  You worked hard in school, went into debt, accepted an offer, honed your expertise, and for many of you, even became a noted and sought after expert in your field.  There’s only one problem.  You’re not happy.  And you’re not alone.  Many trained profesionals  feel trapped in their positions but now require a higher salary, a bigger fee or non-commission-based revenue they have grown accustomed to.  For many, this scenario has been likened to golden handcuffs – tying you to a job you don’t really love, but one in which you have developed the expertise and where you are paid well for your advice.

I can reassure you that if you are committed to your own personal satisfaction and peace of mind, and have the tenacity to embark upon a new path, change is not only possible – it is doable.  Remember the Chinese symbol for fear is a combination of two other symbols:  danger and opportunity.  Use this time in your life as an opportunity to positively transition your career using some of the strategies below.

Tips for professionals in Transition

Following are some practical suggestions to help you assess different paths available to you as a traomed professional:

1.Determine What you Do Best – Manyh of the the skills you use every day as a  trained professional are extremely transferable.  Part of your dissatisfaction likely stems from doing work you don’t enjoy for people who may not appreciate your contribution.  Develop a list of skills and activities you enjoy (writing, mentoring others, providing sound advice to clients, leading your team, etc.) – as well as those you don’t (internal politics, working long hours, research, dealing with those who don’t appreciate or value you, etc.).  Now, review the list and reflect upon the fact that other professions will value and appreciate your best and highest level skills – and those skills are not limited to “just” being a (insert your career here).

2. Identify your Inner Circle – Create a list of your closest clients, contacts, friends, referral sources, business associates, community members, religious leaders; those whose advice you trust and respect.  Use this list to selectively and confidentially meet with your trusted advisors.  Tell them you are open to a change at this stage of your career.  Tell them what you enjoy doing most, and then be open to their ideas and suggestions.

3. Give Rainmaking a Shot – If you are unhappy in your practice, you are likely frustrated about your own perceived lack of marketing savvy.  Before you throw in the towel, develop and implement an individual marketing plan for yourself.  Whether you are a solo practitioner, mentor, an advisor in a small firm, or in a large firm, individual marketing is where the rubber meets the road for trained professionals.

4. Get some Professional Advice – If you are truly looking at making a career change, talk to a professional career counselor; preferably one who has successfully helped in your field of services make career transitions.

5.Consider a Personal Marketing Coach – If you choose #3 above, you might benefit from the focus, accountability, process, and expertise a marketing coach could bring.

6. Beef up your Resume – Regardless of whether or not you make a move now, it is always smart to keep your resume polished and up to date.

7. Create Representative Experience – Define your experience as a trained professional by category of experience.  Then, select the type of clients who best exemplify your work.   Create a brief summary of each engagement by stating: Type of Client, Client’s Issue, My Approach, Solution or Results Generated.  This is a great marketing tool as either an addendum to your resume, or to add to your professional biography.

8. Work your Network – During times of transition it is more important than ever to stay in touch with those in your network.  Make a point to attend events, schedule coffee or lunch, or in other ways to connect with your contacts.  Your next career opportunity will likely come through someone you already know!

9. View Transition as an Opportunity – Pat yourself on the back and acknowledge that many unhappy trained professionals never reach the point of seriously implementing any of the ideas above.  If you choose to, you will find happiness beyond serving as a trained professional, or, with a few adjustments, delivering trained profesional services the way you want to.For other resources and workshops aimed at  Business, employment and  career transition contact

 

EXPRESS REQUEST
Interested in moving forward and speaking one-on-one with one of our coaches? Simply fill out the form below, submit, and a coach will contact you shortly, or contact us anytime at 647.448.2052.  For other resources and workshops aimed at  Business, employment and  career reinvention contact  here

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