International Professionals in Canada: find a temporary job

Do you want to work on a temporary basis in Canada? There are many temporary positions available in various sectors. Companies usually hire out specific small-term projects as temporary positions.  Agency-placed temporary jobs are a growing haven for laid-off professionals and those in skilled trades. 

And with companies cutting millions of full-time jobs this year, staffing industry experts say they’re fielding more and more applications from local and national and international  seasoned workers . Researching companies  is a great way to find temporary jobs in Canada. Here’s tips for finding and keeping the bests Canadian temporary jobs.

1. Target the right firms . Start with a detailed list of companies in the field you are interested and province, check   Canada Employer’s database for Int’l Prfessionals. 

2.  Register with multiple staffing  agencies. Start with a detailed list of companies and staffing firms in your area, check the Canadian Staffing Association’s directory.  It’s not taboo to be working with several placement firms. “It’s understood that (it) happens. Like applying for any job, you circulate your credentials and hope for an assignment.   Many services operate Web sites with helpful career information and links to other resources in addition to online application materials and job postings. Here’s a couple of national and international staffing companies and their main specialties:

Accountemps
Locations: 360 worldwide
Specialties: financial, accounting, credit and collections
Web site:
www.accountemps.com

Aerotek
Locations: 150 worldwide
Specialties: engineering, aviation, scientific and architecture
Web site:
www.aerotek.com

Kelly Services
Locations: 2,000 nationwide
Specialties: professional services, law, health care, technical and administrative
Web site:
www.kellyservices.com

Manpower
Locations: 4,200 worldwide
Specialties: professional services, technical, finance, engineering and administrative
Web site:
www.manpower.com 

 3. Tweak your resume:  Write an Accomplishments-Based Resume. employers  want to know of specific skill sets, the details on projects you’ve manage with success.

4. Be clear and firm about your salary expectations.

5. Ever been told you’re underqualified? Or overqualified? here is the best approach:

Underqualified: in a persuavie way say: “I’m very interested in working for you and your company, and I’ll keep my eye on the website. Remember candidates should indicate that they will address whatever shortcomings they’re told about, she says. They have two choices: either come up with specifics that show the gap actually isn’t there, or propose a plan that would fill any gaps.

The overqualified should avoid telling the interviewer how the company should be run or let an overinflated self-image show. “I want to hear they’re very collaborative and not independent, and that it’s a team approach.” It’s important to “show your passion is for the work, not for being a director or leader.” Candidates should avoid arguin or  explanations like: “I just need a job for now”. Interviewers are looking for people willing to grow with the company, and such answers don’t show a long-term interest in the company or the position.

Overqualified: The best tactic: Agree that “you may be right” but add on “for this job.” The idea is for the candidate to position himself or herself as someone the organization can look to as it grows and needs more experienced people. “What you’re doing is trying to position yourself not just a s a solution for today but for tomorrow.  There’s also absolutely nothing wrong, he adds, with saying you’d be content to take a position that’s seen as below your qualifications. “The world needs movers and shakers but it also needs doers.” If true, a candidate may state clearly that he or she is not interested in moving up in an organization but “they’d be happy to mentor more junior people.”

 6. Once you’re on the job, don’t coast. Temporary jobs are more than a paycheck. They’re a foot in the door to a prospective full-time employer, a networking opportunity and a chance to learn new skills in a new business sector.
7. Take advantage of training. While agency clients expect a basic skill set from their temps, such as meeting work schedules and deadlines and taking instructions from supervisors, most offer some sort of training. You might get a chance to learn a new database, the latest accounting software or how to operate state-of-the-art machinery.

8. Take advantage of temp packages: (medical benefits, paid vacation, RSSP, savings plans, workers’ compensation coverage and other benefits.

9.  Identify and research the companies in your chosen sector.   Once you have decided which industry niche can offer you the career path you are looking for, spend time  researching specific  companies. If possible, find ways to meet and get an interview with individuals (human resource, hiring managers, etc )  from these companies. Interviews always seem to take the format of the employer asking the majority of the questions: this does not have to be the case. I recommend you to prepare at least ten questions before a meeting, and make sure that they are very relevant to the vacancy and your future. Some of your key questions should focus on the internal processes for progression; for example:
■What methods do you use to encourage internal promotions?
■What percentage of staff members have been promoted in the last 12 months?
■Do you have a career development programme in place?
■How does it work?
■How often do appraisals take place?
■How is the information used?
■What is the annual training budget per person

10. Never make a career choice based on money. I know this may sound crazy but choosing your first job or changing your job for money usually only offers short-term benefit.

11. Always try to achieve a sensible work-life balance:  I’d be inclined to look for a new position in a company that recognises the considerable benefits of a healthy balance between work and your life away from work.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, Editor-in-Chief, IA and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an informational services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

  

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