Which employers are willing to help your through Immigration Canada.

In order to work in Canada, a foreign or skill worker needs a work permit. In order to get a work permit a foreign worker or foreign trained professional needs a job offer.   That is your ‘door’ or one of first steps to immigrate to Canada through employment.  What employers or companies are  willing to help you with it?  who or which companies are ready to comply with the law?

First of all,   as editor-in chief of an ePublishing firm I’ll tackle  the question of  who are the employers willing to help through immigration Canada?  Something I got all the time as there are many Canadian companies already working on the issue but  how much is the foreign reader  willing to pay for such  compilation?

Secondly, I’ll answer the question  about  if we are an employmente agency:  no. We are not an employment agency and are not licensed or authorized to find jobs for candidates we are niche publishers. Secondly, if we did so, we’d probably be creating conflict of interest situations. But while our firm can’t find you a job, we CAN give you some good advice:

There ARE such things as “International Trained Professional friendly” companies. We were running such database for years. These can be anything from a giant corporation which routinely is forced to hire foreign talent to a small company which has filed a successful employment-visa in the past in the name of a really great employee and, with the experience demystified and a positive situation, is willing to do so again. As with all employment, SUPPLY and DEMAND is the key issue in your ability to find such company/or  employer. For example, if you are a Computer Programmer with expertise in a hot new programming language, you’ll have companies fighting over you. If you are a recent grad with degree in marketing, then you better be prepared to show prospective employers why you are worth the effort.

In companies which hight hire foreign workers’s volume, the legal fees for thevisa filing are usually paid for by the employer. While there is no prohibition that the employee pay legal and filing fees, there are  others that MUST be paid by the employer. In smaller companies, WHO pays the lawyer fee is a matter of negotiation, again, based on supply and demand. If you are cutting your own deal because you are in high demand, the workers visa processing is usually a part of it. If not, the employer may be willing to sign the papers but not pay. They MUST, ALWAYS, pay the workers visa fee.

So how do you get a job? Well, let’s divide you into three categories:

TEMPORARY PROFESSIONALS ALREADY HERE WISHING TO CHANGE EMPLOYERS:

As you probably know, getting an workers visa transferred is usually less painful than that first work visa approval. If you are in valid work status, recruit aggressively and fire out resumes. If competition for the job is tough, you may want to add in the cover letter that you will be responsible for handling all of the costs associated with the transfer of your work visa, and save in fees explanation for later, in person.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS PLANNING FOR GRADUATION:

You will encounter MANY immigration lawyers who tell you that it’s “safer” to get your work permit as soon as possible and that practical training can be cut short. Don’t buy it. Unless you are graduating with a highly coveted degree and you KNOW you are in great demand, the Post Completion Practical Training can be an INVALUABLE tool. Here’s why: when you start a new job and the employer doesn’t know you, they are right to be concerned about investing the time and the money in getting you an work permit. By starting with them in practical training- which requires NOTHING on their part- and proven your worth to them- you set up a situation where the transfer to work permit status a year later is a piece of cake if you don’t have or gained an internship while at school. I have had dozens of inquiries follow this advice successfully…six months into the practical training, I get a call from the client and after 5 mellow minutes explaining what we need to do in six months, the employer is happy and ready to commit to the work permit. Besides, if you DON’T use the year of practical training or internship, you are wasting a year of work permit status!

NOTE: there are some limited situations where it DOES make sense to cut your internship or practical training short in exchange for an work permit. As we have explained in the past,  internship status is an extension of the student visa, which requires continuing nonimmigrant intent. Conversely, the work permit does NOT require proof of nonimmigrant intent. Consider the following situation:

EXAMPLE: You graduate and start practical training. Your girlfriend, a lawful permanent resident, and you decide to get married. You do so and she files an immigrant petition on your behalf, but it will take a few years for the priority date to become current. If you remain in the international student internship status and travel during that year after graduation, you risk getting stuck abroad! By filing your petition, you have demonstrated that you intend to immigrate. In doing so, you are deniable at entry as  student visa  if you travel abroad…so if you ARE going to travel that first year, you’d better switch to work permit and get stamped while abroad with a new international student stamp in your passport.

PROFESSIONALS ABROAD LOOKING TO WORK IN CANADA FOR THE FIRST TIME

I imagine that we have many of these among our readers, as this question appears in e-mail all the time. Here’s the best advice I can give you about finding an Immigration-based visa position in Canada.

Rely almost exclusively on the Internet for your career search, especially if you are in a high-tech field.
If you have any friends or family in Canada., ask them to help you in your job search.
NEVER, EVER pay a “finders fee” to a company purporting to place professionals. Except for megafirms, I have YET to see a SINGLE such situation which did not result in an absolute theft of money. The REAL employers don’t charge you because they need you if they are bothering to consider work permit visa applicants!

Don’t be shy about asking for company information, but don’t be obnoxious. I can’t begin to tell you how many calls I get from great employers expressing disbelief at the arrogance of some of the applicants, sitting overseas, “demanding” this and that. Without respect and common courtesy, forget it…Canadian employers understand an egalitarian system, and you should treat whomever you are communicating with- from the lowliest clerk to the CEO – with the same modesty and respect with which YOU would like to be treated.

Everybody and their brother is on the Internet. Before you go with the “exciting new upstart” (translation: we are new, enthusiastic, and have no history), spend HOURS researching them online. Dig deep for information and if it isn’t there, most likely they are not there either…

If they ask you for original documents- degrees, passports, etc.- tell them you understand that if you provide them with certified copies that will suffice. If they say that they must have originals, I can almost guarantee you that you are dealing with a disreputable company. It’s a lie.
If they tell you that “the case is pending”, then they should have, within a couple of weeks of filing, a receipt from the Canada Immigration. Adjudication may be slow, but the receipts are not.

So there you have it, folks. Best of luck in your Canada job hunt!

Marisol Diaz
Settlement & Integration Resources Publisher
Int’l Employment & Career Columnist
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