Posts Tagged ‘ Canadian Job companies database ’

Immigrating as a Business Person to Canada

 Who is a Business Immigrant? Business immigrants are people who can invest in, or start businesses in Canada and are expected to support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The Business Immigration Program seeks to attract people experienced in business to Canada.

Business immigrants are selected based on their ability to become economically established in Canada.
 

Canadian business culture
The business culture in Canada is one build on efficacy and respect for laws, regulations and rights for workers and investors.  Many newcomers to the country note how different it is to do business here and that the high level of transparency make it a preferable place to do business. 

The banking system in Canada
The banks in Canada are among the most stable in the entire world.  There are many loan and credit programs designed to assist business buyers.  The Business Development Bank (BDC) is a federal Crown corporation with mandate to assist in small and medium-sized business financing, including acquisitions.

Highly developed society and economy
The economic system is one of the most advanced in the world.  The largest city of Toronto, Ontario has numerous business opportunities, an affluent market, educated workforce and sophisticated investors to draw upon.  Canada, and southern Ontario specifically, is one of the best places anywhere to purchase a business.

Start a business or buy one?
Starting up a business is a very risk proposition.  It involves committing some level of capital at risk and essentially starting from day one with no cash flow.  Buying a business can be far less risky.  Revenue is usually present from the onset and processes, clients, vendors and staff are already in place.  Buying established businesses for sale is a common path for new immigrants to establish themselves economically in Canada.

The question most new arrivals to the country as is where to look to find a company to buy.  Although there may appear to be many business listings, relatively few are actually ventures which will sell.  If you know of a business broker in your community or perhaps an M&A advisor that you can consult with, that would be a good first step.  Talking to a professional that is in constant contact with buyers and sellers is the recommended starting point.  You can rely on searching the internet to find a business for sale but the reality is that you can be searching for a long time by just relying on that channel.
 

Canadian Entrepreneur Programs

The Entrepreneur Program seeks to attract people with business experience who have the intention and ability to actively manage a Canadian business that will positively impact the Canadian economy and create employment opportunities for Canadian residents.
 

Find out if you qualify  As a qualified Entrepreneur, you and your immediate family can obtain Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visas under the Federal Program (applicants intending to reside anywhere in Canada, except Quebec). The Entrepreneur Program requires you to establish or acquire a percentage of equity (at least 33.33%) in a qualifying Canadian business that you must actively manage. Your business must create at least one new job for a

  • Canadian citizen or permanent resident.
  • Open for business through immigration

Provincial Nominee Program for Business
This program allows Manitoba to recruit and nominate for Canadian permanent resident status qualified business people from around the world who have the intent and ability to move to Manitoba and establish, purchase a business or become partners in an existing business.

Young Farmer Nominee Program
If you are considering starting a farm in Manitoba but do not meet the eligibility criteria for the PNP-B, the Young Farmer Nominee Program is an exciting opportunity that may still allow you to qualify.  Read more  here

 

 

 

Contact Hineni Consultancy  or  also subscribe to  our Business Opportunities Database    if you are a business immigrant looking for more information on buying a small business. 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  or  the Canadian Employer Directory  ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

The Canadian database  for Int’l Employers

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Search for Health Jobs or Seasonal Visa Jobs  in Canada. Available only to premium subscribers.


 

 

IMMIGRATING TO CANADA AS SELF EMPLOYED

The Canada self-employed immigration programme is like a business visa service designed for those wishing to live and work in Canada on a permanent basis.  Canadian Self Employed visas, along with the Canadian Immigrant Investor Program or (IIP) and Canadian Entrepreneur Immigrant Programme make up the Canadian Business Immigration Programme, a range of business visas designed to attract Canadian visa applications from people with desirable business skills and experience.
 

This site can help you to navigate the wide range of visas for Canada available and determine which Canadian business immigration service is most appropriate for your requirements.
 

As a  specialist on Canadian immigration information services, we can lead you at every stage of your visa application and our partner immigration consultants can provide everything required for your relocation to Canada from immigration lawyer advice, information on immigration processes and more.
 

Benefits
Applying for Canadian visas of this kind constitutes a route to settlement in Canada, and accordingly, confers permanent residence status upon successful applicants.
No time restrictions are placed upon a business visa for this route as is the case with temporary immigration services such as the Canadian visit visa.
As permanent residents, candidates will receive the same rights and privileges as Canadian citizens with the exception of the right to vote.
Beyond permanent residency, after three years in Canada, applicants may be able to pursue a grant of Canadian citizenship.
Eligibility Criteria
In Canada, immigration applications of this type do not require a minimum net worth to be demonstrated. However, it is necessary to satisfy an entry clearance officer that you have sufficient capital to settle yourself and your family and to carry out your proposal.
Migration to Canada for the purpose of self-employment requires applicants to be able to contribute to cultural or athletic activities or to purchase and manage a farm.
Candidates may only apply for one type of Canadian business immigration service. Once an application has been made, it is not permitted to switch to an alternative route.
Points System
Applying for a Canadian self employed visa requires a candidate to achieve the minimum pass mark on a points based skills assessment.
Candidates are assessed according to their business experience, educational achievements, age and language proficiency, and must achieve a score of 35 or more points.
Business Experience
Business experience gained in the five years directly prior to an application being submitted is worth between 20 and 35 points.
Education
•In Canada, visa applications of this kind receive 5-25 points for a candidate’s level of education. Points are awarded based on an applicant’s highest academic qualification and the amount of time spent in education.
•Master’s degree or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time study – 25 Points.
•Two or more bachelor’s degrees and at least 15 years of full-time study – 22
•Three year diploma, apprenticeship or trade certificate and at least 15 years of full-time study – 22 Points.
•Bachelor’s degree plus at least 14 years of full-time study – 20 Points.
•Two year diploma, apprenticeship or trade certificate and at least 14 years of full-time Study – 20 Points.
•One-year Bachelor’s degree plus at least 13 years of full-time study – 15 Points.
•One year diploma, apprenticeship or trade certificate and at least 13 years of full-time study – 15 Points.
•One year diploma, apprenticeship or trade certificate plus at least 12 years of full-time study – 12 Points.
•Graduation (Secondary School) – 5 Points.
 

Language Skills

A self employment visa for Canadian migration allows a successful applicant to become a permanent Canadian resident and as such, points are awarded for proficiency in either French or English, the official languages of Canada.
 

In cases where a candidate is skilled in both languages, they should select one to be their “first language”. The points system awards a maximum of four points for the first language and two points for the second in each of the four assessed ability areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
 

First Language Points awarded per ability area
•High – 4 Points.
•Moderate – 2 Points.
•Basic – 1-2 Points.
•None – 0.

 

Second Language Points awarded per ability area

•High – 2 Points.
•Moderate – 2 Points.
•Basic – 1 – 2 Points.
•None – 0.
Age

An applicant’s age can be worth a maximum of 10 points when applying for Canadian immigration visas of this class. 10 points are awarded to those aged between 21 and 49. For each year outside this range, two points are deducted with no points available to those aged less than 17 or more than 53.
 

Adaptability to life in Canada
Applications for Canadian visas through this route primarily use the same points assessment criteria as both the immigrant investor visa and the entrepreneur visa.
 

However, in the area of adaptability, a different system is employed which takes into account previous work or study conducted in Canada, Canadian relatives and your partner’s education.

Spouse or Common-law partner’s Education
•Master’s degree or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time study – 5 Points.
•Three year university qualification and at least 15 years of full-time study – 4 Points.
•Three year post-secondary qualification and at least 15 years of full-time study – 4 Points.
•One or two year post-secondary qualification and at least 13 years of full-time study – 3 Points.
•Secondary school diploma or less – 0 points.

Study conducted in Canada Applicant or partner
•Post-secondary educational qualification of at least 2 years obtained in Canada since the age of 18 – 5 Points.
•Less than two years post-secondary education in Canada, or none at all – 0 Points.

Work conducted in Canada Applicant or partner
•1 year or more of full time work in Canada – 5 Points.
•Less than 1 year of full time work in Canada, or none at all – 0 Points.

Existing family in Canada Applicant or partner
•Parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, sister, brother, nephew, niece, child or grandchild who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident living in Canada – 5 Points.
•No relatives at all in Canada – 0 Points.

Dependants

In Canada, visa applications of this kind permit spouse and dependent immigration for your husband, wife, unmarried partner, or common-law partner to migrate to Canada.
Any unmarried and dependent children who are under the age of 22 may also join you in the country.

Note and disclaimer: Nothing on this or associated pages, documents, comments, answers, e-mail, articles or other communications should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisement.  Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifiied and experience attorneys . 

Contact Hineni Consultancy  or  also subscribe to  our Business Opportunities Database    if you are a business immigrant looking for more information on buying a small business. 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  or  the Canadian Employer Directory  ,  a Paid Content   or Informational Services site run by Hineni Media.

The Canadian database  for Int’l Employers

Access more than 400,000+ Canadian province-specific company profiles in industries such as manufacturing, transportation, consumer goods, consulting services, finance and technology.  Search for Health Jobs or Seasonal Visa Jobs  in Canada. Available only to premium subscribers.


 

Canada’s Job Supply Outlook

 A key function of labour market information is to provide insight into expected future trends in the labour market. What jobs are most likely to be in demand in the future? Which industries are expected to grow most quickly? What skills and abilities will be needed? Answers to these questions help all kinds of people make informed decisions.

Labour Market (2006-2015)

Job Supply Outlook

About one third of job openings (or close to 1.8 million) will be in occupations requiring college education or apprenticeship training, while 26.5% of job openings will be in occupations requiring only high school education. Over the next several years, 21.3% of job openings will be in occupations requiring a university education, and 11% of job openings will be in management occupations.

 By 2015, about six million people will enter the Canadian labour market, with 80% of them coming out of the formal education system. In 2015 alone, the number of school leavers (or graduates) is predicted to be 572,000.

 Although immigrants are an important part of the labour supply, they represent only a fifth of new job seekers. By 2015, the number of immigrant job seekers in Canada is expected to reach 131,000.

 Given these forecasts of job openings and new job seekers in the future, as well as the examination of current labour market trends, many occupations are predicted to continue to have imbalances between supply and demand over the medium term.

 The majority of management occupations currently under pressure are predicted to continue to face pressures into 2015, as the predicted number of new job openings is predicted to be greater than the predicted number of new job seekers. The increased need to replace retiring employees will open up many positions in various occupations, including human resources managers, legislators, senior managers, supervisors in facility operation, trades, processing, as well as oil and gas drilling and service. Pressures in shortage are also predicted to occur in two managerial occupations: managers in public administration; and managers in education, health, and social and community services.

 

The aging of the population will lead to increased health care needs, which will cause demand to outpace supply for several occupations in health care. The following occupations are expected to experience shortage pressures into 2015: optometrists, physicians, head nurses and supervisors, health diagnosing and treating professionals, nurse aides, and orderlies.

 

Human resources and business services are predicted to continue experiencing shortage pressures as employers continue emphasizing recruitment and retainment of quality workers to handle the economy’s increasingly complex jobs.

 Oil and gas well drillers, testers, servicers, and related workers are expected to keep feeling pressures into 2015 as a result of a rise in demand associated with large capital spending projects, like the tar sands development projects in Alberta. Lastly, strong non-residential construction and renovation will benefit residential home builders and renovators, as well as civil engineers.

 

On the other hand, some occupations with current shortage pressures will reach a better balance between labour supply and demand. These include jobs in residential construction and real estate, resulting from an expected slowdown in residential investment. University professors are also expected to experience fewer pressures as more individuals complete their doctoral studies, though some shortage may persist in certain discipline. The same can be said of geophysicists, geochemists, and geologists, thanks in part to the large number of people enrolled in areas of study related to physical science. Computer and software engineers will also have enough supply to satisfy labour demand.

 

All occupations that are now in excess supply are predicted to remain so into 2015. For the most part, these occupations are in low-skilled categories.

 

The examination of future labour market situations presupposes that current labour demand and supply trends will persist. Imbalances in the labour market’s occupational sectors may actually diminish and/or disappear as individuals and firms respond to market signals or to data about prospective imbalances. For instance, young people may choose to enroll in areas of study that are associated with occupations that are in excess demand, or job holders may choose to move into jobs where demand is greater. Companies may choose to use less labour and more machinery and equipment if the relative price of labour grows. With time, such demand and supply adjustments will add to lessened labour market pressures in occupations with excess demand.

Here an  example  of  Alberta, Canada

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

The Most In-Demand Jobs in Canada

*Nontraditional occupations are defined by HRSDC -department of Human Resources and Skills Development- as jobs in which 25 percent or less of the workforce is femaleTRANSPORTATION,
AUTOMOTIVE and MOTOR SPORTS

• Auto body/Repair Technician*
• Auto body Refinishing Technician*
• Automotive Systems Technician*
• Motor Sports Management
• Diesel Mechanics*
• Truck Driver Training*
• HEATT (Heavy Equipment & Transport Technology)CONSTRUCTION / ENGINEERING / ENERGY
• Basic Plumbing*
• Brick Masonry *
• Carpentry*
• Civil/GIS Drafting
• Geospatial Technology
• Electrical Engineering Technology*
• Electrical Installation and Maintenance*
• Industrial Systems/Technical Operations or
Maintenance Specialist (NC IST)
• Mechanical Engineering Technology*
• HVAC Installation Technician*
• AC/Heating Maintenance*
• Landscape Designer
• Horticulturist
• Landscape Maintenance
• Turf Management
• Mechanical Engineering
• Forklift Repair Technician*
• Construction Managers
• Project Management
• Welding
• Non-Destructive Examination Technician

BUSINESS and
FINANCIAL SERVICES

• Accounting/Payroll Specialist
• Administrative Software Specialist
• Administrative Clerk
• Business Administration
• Certified Management Accountant
• Certified Payroll Professional
• Desktop Publishing & Graphic Design
• Entertainment Technology
• eCommerce/Marketing Specialist
• Human Resources/Employee Benefits Specialist
• Certificate in Software Use (MOUS)
• Customer Service/Keyboarding/CTR
• Paralegal Training
• Project Management
• Receptionist/Office Skills
• Six Sigma (Quality Training)

MANUFACTURING and DISTRIBUTION
• CNC Programming and Operations
• Forklift Operations*
• Machinist*

     HEALTHCARE
• Biomedical Electronics Technician (BMET)
• Biotechnology
• Cardiac Catheterization Technologist
• Certified Dietary Manager
• Dental Assistant
• Dental Hygienist
• Developmental Disabilities Technician
• Echocardiography Technologist
• Emergency Medical Technician
• Healthcare Technician
• Health Information Technician
• Health Unit Nursing Secretary
• Medical Office Technology
• Medical Assistant
• Medical Lab Technician
• Medical Receptionist
• Medical Reimbursement Specialist
• Nursing Assistant/Aide I & II
• Paramedic
• Pharmacy Technician
• Phlebotomist
• Physical Therapist
• Physical Therapist Assistant
• Radiology Technician
• Registered Nurse
• Respiratory Therapist
• Respiratory Therapist Assistant
• Sleep Technician
• Surgical TechnicianHOSPITALITY & TOURISM
• Hotel/Restaurant Management
• Culinary Arts
• Baking & Pastry ArtsINFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
• Cisco Certified Network Professional
• Computer Programmers
• Computer Security Specialists
• Computer Software Engineers, Applications
• Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software
• Computer Support Specialists
• Computer Systems Analysts
• Database Management (Microsoft, Oracle)
• INET+ Certification
• Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator
• Network and Computer Systems Administrators
• Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts
• Object Oriented Programming
• PC Repair Technician
• System Security Administrator
• Security Analyst

PROFESSIONAL and PARAPROFESSIONAL, OTHER
• Early Childhood Education
• Police/Fire Science*
• Teacher Assistant Certification
• Teacher Certification
• Teacher Education
• Environmental Health and Safety Technician
• Human Services Paraprofessional
• Substance Abuse Counselor
• Social Worker
• Veterinary Technician
• Funeral Services (effective 2010/03/09)

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Canada’s s Occupational Job Demand

11 new opportunity occupations for immigrants in Canada

Canada Permanent resident card is the dream of many would-be immigrants from all over the world. One of the ways to qualify is to apply as a skilled worker in one of the qualifying occupations.  Last month the Federal government added 11 new professions to the list which is great news for dentists, dentist, pharmacists and architects among others. The reasons for this is that most regions in Canada are experiencing a shortage of professionals and skilled workers in these occupations, and some cities and regions have a particularly high need for workers with this experience that is why they have the best chance for success in finding full-time permanent employment in Canada.

Here is the list of the 11 new occupations:

•Architects
•Biologists
•Contractors and Supervisors in mechanic trades
•Dentists
•Dental Hygienists
•Insurance agents
•Pharmacists
•Primary Production managers
•Professionals in Business services to Managers
•Psychologists
•Social workers
 

In order to qualify in one of the 11 new occupations, skilled workers should have at least 1 year of paid experience within the last ten years. Canadian Immigration Minister Jason Kenney announced that Canadian government has amended its current immigration procedures to put even greater emphasis on reducing the Federal Skilled Worker application backlog.

For those skilled workers applying under the occupation list, the government will limit the number of applications considered for processing to 20,000 total per year. Within the 20,000 limit, a maximum of 1,000 applications per occupation will be considered. This limit, however,  does not apply to applicants with a job offer.

If you do not at first see your occupation on this below general  list go to the NOC web site at:
Canadian National Occupational Classification. It may be included in one of the older occupations in the list below.

NOC#: Occupation
0631 : Restaurant and Food Service Managers
0811 : Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)
1122 : Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
1233 : Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
2121 : Biologists and Related Scientists
2151 : Architects
3111 : Specialist Physicians
3112 : General Practitioners and Family Physicians
3113 : Dentists
3131 : Pharmacists
3142 : Physiotherapists
3152 : Registered Nurses
3215 : Medical Radiation Technologists
3222 : Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists
3233 : Licensed Practical Nurses
4151 : Psychologists
4152 : Social Workers
6241 : Chefs
6242 : Cooks
7215 : Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
7216 : Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
7241 : Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)
7242 : Industrial Electricians
7251 : Plumbers
7265 : Welders & Related Machine Operators
7312 : Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
7371 : Crane Operators
7372 : Drillers & Blasters Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction
8222 : Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service

NOTE: the occupations above are all Skill Type 0 (managerial occupations) or Skill Level A (professional occupations) or B (technical occupations and skilled trades) on the Canadian National Occupational Classification list.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

Priority Occupations in Canada

A priority occupation is one that the Government of Canada has identified after extensive consultations as being in high demand. You must have at least one year of continuous work experience in this occupation to be eligible to apply as a federal skilled worker.

It’s crucial to understand how positions are both advertised and filled. In  Canada the three most popular methods employers use to find new talent / employees are:

1) Networking
2) Use of placement agencies and recruiters
3) Advertisements – both print and online
4) Job oppenings in their company’s website
 

 

Here’s the hottest 29 Canadian in-demand occupations:

•0631 Restaurant and Food Service Managers
•0811 Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)
•1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
•1233 Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
•2121 Biologists and Related Scientists
•2151 Architects
•3111 Specialist Physicians
•3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians
•3113 Dentists
•3131 Pharmacists
•3142 Physiotherapists
•3152 Registered Nurses
•3215 Medical Radiation Technologists
•3222 Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists
•3233 Licensed Practical Nurses
•4151 Psychologists
•4152 Social Workers
•6241 Chefs
•6242 Cooks
•7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
•7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
•7241 Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)
•7242 Industrial Electricians
•7251 Plumbers
•7265 Welders & Related Machine Operators
•7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
•7371 Crane Operators
•7372 Drillers & Blasters – Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction
•8222 Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service
More information on the current Priority Occupation List for Canada can be found at the Working in Canada website.

 Find out which jobs are considered to be in high demand in Canada. This information includes education and regulation or licence requirements.

One of the best source of  Canadian company information  . Why? because a company’s website, it’s an absolutely amazing place of info. You can either try directly entering the company’s name in your favorite browser.

The best source for conducting your initial Canadian’s  company research is Hineni’s  Database,  run by Hineni Media. Hineni’s database is a compilation of more than 500 host organizations with preexisting sponsoring and Co-ops placements  spanning over 85 areas of interest. Searchable by location, level of study, field and area of interest, it provides an excellent starting point for professionals searching for their ideal seasonal or permanent  job opportunity.  The database is a great place to start your search. Contact here or subscribe online  to access .

From there, I would locate the professional organizations for the given career. For example, if you were interested in marketing as a career, I would recommend contacting the Canadian Marketing Association to learn more about demanded careers in marketing. To get salary information for a specific geographic location, I would use one of the many salary calculators available online.

Do your research, polish your job-search materials, network, and go after a specific job. And be sure to follow-up each and every job lead — until you land that job.

 

Marisol Diaz  is  an experienced workshop presenter, specialized information publisher, and  a SOHO specialist. She also  has been writing on Canada settlement and  immigration law since 2006. contact her @ hinenisyndicator@gmail.com. You can improve your Canada job search through the Canadian database  for Int’l Employers  here ,  an Paid Content or Informational Services run by Hineni Media
 

Note and disclaimer: No attorney/client relationship is formed through the submission or viewing of this article. This article is not intended as a substitute for legal advice from a licensed attorney. The facts of every case are different and individualized advice should be sought from an attorney before proceeding with any case.

List of Canadian visa employers for 2009

This database shows all employers who received approval from  Canadian Immigration  for work permit/ visas in federal fiscal year 2009.

The database can be set to display between 10 and 200 employers on a single page. To search for individual companies, please use the search link above the column heads. ( see the full listing, work permit/ Co-Op work  use by Canadian firms holds steady in ’09.)
Canadian Employers approved for  work Permit visas in 2009

 

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www.hinenimedia.memberlodge.org

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